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Volume 23, Number 5—May 2017
Etymologia

Etymologia: Fluoroquinolone

Ronnie HenryComments to Author 

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Fluoroquinolone [floorʺo-kwinʹo-lōn]

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Thumbnail of By Reubot, Public domain, Wikimedia Commons, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=14746558

Figure. By Reubot, Public domain, Wikimedia Commons, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=14746558

The first quinolone (quinol[ine] + -one [compound related to ketone]), nalidixic acid (Figure), was isolated as a byproduct of chloroquine (see “quinine”) synthesis and was introduced in 1962 to treat urinary tract infections. In 1980, researchers at the Kyorin Pharmaceutical Company showed that the addition of a fluorine atom to the quinolone ring resulted in an antibiotic with broader antimicrobial activity, which was named norfloxacin, the first fluoroquinolone. In 1983, Bayer published data that showed adding a single carbon atom to norfloxacin—what would become ciprofloxacin—further increased activity. Fluoroquinolones are today among the most frequently used antimicrobial drugs to treat infections in humans and animals.

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References

  1. Dorland’s Illustrated Medical Dictionary. 32nd ed. Philadelphia: Elsevier Saunders; 2012.
  2. Ito  A, Hirai  K, Inoue  M, Koga  H, Suzue  S, Irikura  T, et al. In vitro antibacterial activity of AM-715, a new nalidixic acid analog. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1980;17:1038. DOIPubMed
  3. Petri  WA Jr. Sulfonamides, trimethoprim–sulfamethoxazole, quinolones, and agents for urinary tract infections. In: Brunton LL, editor. Goodman and Gilman’s The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics. 12th ed. New York: McGraw Hill; 2011. p. 1463–76.
  4. Wise  R, Andrews  JM, Edwards  LJ. In vitro activity of Bay 09867, a new quinoline derivative, compared with those of other antimicrobial agents. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 1983;23:55964. DOIPubMed

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Cite This Article

DOI: 10.3201/eid2305.et2305

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Table of Contents – Volume 23, Number 5—May 2017

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Ronnie Henry, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Mailstop E03, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA

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Page created: March 31, 2017
Page updated: March 31, 2017
Page reviewed: March 31, 2017
The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.
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