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Volume 24, Number 7—July 2018
Research

Molecular Epidemiology of Human Adenovirus–Associated Febrile Respiratory Illness in Soldiers, South Korea1

Jung Yeon Heo2, Ji Yun Noh2, Hye Won Jeong, Kang-Won Choe, Joon Young Song, Woo Joo Kim, and Hee Jin CheongComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon, South Korea (J.Y. Heo); Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea (J.Y. Noh, J.Y. Song, W.J. Kim, H.J. Cheong); Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju, South Korea (H.W. Jeong); The Armed Forces Capital Hospital, Seongnam, South Korea (K.-W. Choe)

Main Article

Figure 2

Phylogenetic tree human adenoviruses detected among soldiers with acute febrile respiratory illness from human adenovirus (HAdV) infection, South Korea, January 2013–April 2014. Tree was constructed by the neighbor-joining method on the basis of a 232-bp nucleotide sequence of the hexon gene. We used MEGA 6 software (20) to generate the phylogenetic tree and evaluated topologies by using bootstrap analysis of 1,000 iterations. GenBank accession numbers of sequences of HAdV from the soldiers with

Figure 2. Phylogenetic tree human adenoviruses detected among soldiers with acute febrile respiratory illness from human adenovirus (HAdV) infection, South Korea, January 2013–April 2014. Tree was constructed by the neighbor-joining method on the basis of a 232-bp nucleotide sequence of the hexon gene. We used MEGA 6 software (20) to generate the phylogenetic tree and evaluated topologies by using bootstrap analysis of 1,000 iterations. GenBank accession numbers of sequences of HAdV from the soldiers with acute febrile respiratory illness (indicated by black diamonds) were KX227462–KX227469 and KX513954–KX513985. GenBank accession numbers of reference adenovirus sequences are shown in the tree. Scale bar indicates nucleotide substitutions per site. HAdV, human adenovirus.

Main Article

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Main Article

1Preliminary results from this study were presented at the European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases 2015, convened April 25–28, 2015, in Copenhagen, Denmark.

2These authors contributed equally to this article.

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The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.
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