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Volume 24, Number 9—September 2018
Research Letter

Case of Microcephaly after Congenital Infection with Asian Lineage Zika Virus, Thailand

Thidathip Wongsurawat1, Niracha Athipanyasilp1, Piroon Jenjaroenpun, Se-Ran Jun, Bualan Kaewnapan, Trudy M. Wassenaar, Nattawat Leelahakorn, Nasikarn Angkasekwinai, Wannee Kantakamalakul, David W. Ussery, Ruengpung Sutthent, Intawat Nookaew2Comments to Author , and Navin Horthongkham2Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA (T. Wongsurawat, P. Jenjaroenpun, S.-R. Jun, D.W. Ussery, I. Nookaew); Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand (N. Athipanyasilp, B. Kaewnapan, N. Leelahakorn, N. Angkasekwinai, W. Kantakamalakul, R. Sutthent, N. Horthongkham); Molecular Microbiology and Genomics Consultants, Zotzenheim, Germany (T.M. Wassenaar)

Main Article

Figure

Maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis of nonredundant Zika virus genomes including 7 isolates from patients in Thailand, 2016–2017, and amino acid changes corresponding with 3 evolutionary events (2). Circles indicate the Zika virus isolates from this report; the Zika virus strains used by Liang et al. (3) are indicated by asterisks and Yuan et al. (4) by squares. The key amino acid residue changes corresponding with the 3 evolutionary events (2) are shown, and the conserved amino acid substi

Figure. Maximum-likelihood phylogenetic analysis of nonredundant Zika virus genomes including 7 isolates from patients in Thailand, 2016–2017, and amino acid changes corresponding with 3 evolutionary events (2). Circles indicate the Zika virus isolates from this report; the Zika virus strains used by Liang et al. (3) are indicated by asterisks and Yuan et al. (4) by squares. The key amino acid residue changes corresponding with the 3 evolutionary events (2) are shown, and the conserved amino acid substitution S17N, present in the American lineage but not in the other lineages, is in bold. The amino acid residues of the 7 isolates from this report are identical to those of the other Asian lineage isolates. C, capsid; prM, premembrane; NS, nonstructural protein. Scale bar indicates nucleotide changes per basepair.

Main Article

References
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Main Article

1These first authors contributed equally to this article.

2These senior authors contributed equally to this article.

Page created: August 17, 2018
Page updated: August 17, 2018
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