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Volume 25, Number 2—February 2019
Historical Review

Killing Clothes Lice by Holding Infested Clothes Away from Hosts for 10 Days to Control Louseborne Relapsing Fever, Bahir Dah, Ethiopia

Stephen C. BarkerComments to Author  and Dayana Barker
Author affiliations: University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia (S.C. Barker); University of Queensland School of Veterinary Sciences, Gatton, Queensland, Australia (D. Barker)

Main Article

Figure 4

Number of days needed to starve to death adult and nymphal clothes lice (Pediculus humanus) at 5 temperatures (10°C, 15°C, 24°C, 30°C, and 35°C), Ethiopia. The mortality rate was 50% for lice after 5 days without a blood meal (i.e., from the host) and 100% after 10 days without a blood meal, regardless of temperature. Dotted lines indicate temperatures of 0°C–19°C and days 0–7. Data were obtained from Buxton (42), and the figure was modified from Busvine (30).

Figure 4. Number of days needed to starve to death adult and nymphal clothes lice (Pediculus humanus) at 5 temperatures (10°C, 15°C, 24°C, 30°C, and 35°C), Ethiopia. The mortality rate was 50% for lice after 5 days without a blood meal (i.e., away from the host) and 100% after 10 days without a blood meal, regardless of temperature. Dotted lines indicate temperatures of 0°C–19°C and days 0–7. Data were obtained from Buxton (42), and the figure was modified from Busvine (30).

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Page updated: January 18, 2019
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