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Volume 25, Number 4—April 2019
Etymologia

Etymologia: Anaplasma phagocytophilum

Ronnie HenryComments to Author 

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Anaplasma phagocytophilum [anʺǝ-plazʹmǝ faʹgo-sītʺo-fī-lum]

Figure

Thumbnail of Anaplasma phagocytophilum cultured in human promyelocytic cells, showing morulae as basophilic and intracytoplasmic inclusions (arrows). Wright-Giemsa stain. Original magnification x1,000. Image: Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20:1708–11.

Figure. Anaplasma phagocytophilum cultured in human promyelocytic cells, showing morulae as basophilic and intracytoplasmic inclusions (arrows). Wright-Giemsa stain. Original magnification x1,000. Image: Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20:1708–11.

A species of tickborne bacteria that causes human granulocytic anaplasmosis, Anaplasma (from the Greek an- [“without”] + plasma [“shape”]) phagocytophilum (named for its affinity for growing in neutrophils: phagocyte + Latin phile [“loving”]) has gone by many names (Figure). First it was named Rickettsia (for Howard Taylor Ricketts) phagocytophilum, then Cytoecetes (for its similarity to Cytoecetes microti) phagocytophilum, and then Ehrlichia (for Paul Ehrlich) phagocytophilum. More recently, E. equi and the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis (now anaplasmosis) were combined with E. phagocytophilum as A. phagocytophilum.

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References

  1. Kim  K-H, Yi  J, Oh  WS, Kim  NH, Choi  SJ, Choe  PG, et al. Human granulocytic anaplasmosis, South Korea, 2013. Emerg Infect Dis. 2014;20:170811. DOIPubMed
  2. Woldehiwet  Z. The natural history of Anaplasma phagocytophilum. Vet Parasitol. 2010;167:10822. DOIPubMed

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Cite This Article

DOI: 10.3201/eid2504.et2504

Original Publication Date: 2/28/2019

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Table of Contents – Volume 25, Number 4—April 2019

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Ronnie Henry, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Mailstop E28, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA

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Page created: March 18, 2019
Page updated: March 18, 2019
Page reviewed: March 18, 2019
The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.
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