Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options Skip directly to A-Z link Skip directly to A-Z link Skip directly to A-Z link
Volume 28, Number 8—August 2022
Etymologia

Dermatophilus congolensis

Rüdiger D. OllhoffComments to Author , Fabio C. Pogliani, and Fábio P. Sellera
Author affiliations: Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, Curitiba, Brazil (R.D. Ollhoff); Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil (F.P. Sellera, F.C. Pogliani); Universidade Metropolitana de Santos, Santos, Brazil (F.P. Sellera)

Cite This Article

Dermatophilus congolensis [dur″mə-tof′ĭ-ləs con-gō-len′sis]

Figure 1

Photomicrograph of Dermatophilus congolensis, showing a Giemsa-stained, Gram-positive bacteria. Source: Dr. Jerrold Kaplan, Centers for Disease Control, 1965.

Figure 1. Photomicrograph of Dermatophilus congolensis, showing a Giemsa-stained, Gram-positive bacteria. Source: Dr. Jerrold Kaplan, Centers for Disease Control, 1965.

From the Greek derma (skin) + philos (loving), Dermatophilus congolensis is a Gram-positive, aerobic actinomycete, and facultatively anaerobic bacteria (Figure 1). D. congolensis infects the epidermis and produces exudative dermatitis termed dermatophilosis that was previously known as rain rot, rain scald, streptotrichosis, and mycotic dermatitis.

Figure 2

René Van Saceghem (1884–1965). Source: Mortelmans J. Veterinary medicine in Belgian Congo and Ruanda-Urundi from 1885 to 1962 [in French]. Vlaams Diergeneeskundig Tijdschrift. 2003;72:83–95. Courtesy of the Institute of Tropical Medicine (Antwerp). https://vdt.ugent.be/?q=nl/content/72-2-83-95

Figure 2. René Van Saceghem (1884–1965). Source: Mortelmans J. Veterinary medicine in Belgian Congo and Ruanda-Urundi from 1885 to 1962 [in French]. Vlaams Diergeneeskundig Tijdschrift. 2003;72:83–95. Courtesy of the Institute of Tropical...

In 1915, René Van Saceghem (Figure 2), a Belgian military veterinarian stationed at a veterinary laboratory in the former Belgian Congo (thus, the species name congolensis), reported D. congolensis from exudative dermatitis in cattle. Local breeders and veterinarians had observed the disease since 1910, but the causal agent was not identified.

Dermatophilosis affects animals, mainly cattle, and more rarely humans. Outbreaks of D. congolensis infection have severe economic implications in the livestock and leather industries.

Top

References

  1. Amor  A, Enríquez  A, Corcuera  MT, Toro  C, Herrero  D, Baquero  M. Is infection by Dermatophilus congolensis underdiagnosed? J Clin Microbiol. 2011;49:44951. DOIPubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Branford  I, Johnson  S, Chapwanya  A, Zayas  S, Boyen  F, Mielcarska  MB, et al. Comprehensive molecular dissection of Dermatophilus congolensis genome and first observation of tet(z) tetracycline resistance. Int J Mol Sci. 2021;22:7128. DOIPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Dorland’s illustrated medical dictionary. 32nd ed. Philadelphia: Elsevier Saunders; 2012.
  4. Van Saceghem  R. Contagious skin disease (contagious impetigo) [in French]. Bull Soc Pathol Exot. 1915;8:3549.

Top

Figures

Top

Cite This Article

DOI: 10.3201/eid2808.212573

Original Publication Date: July 11, 2022

Related Links

Top

Table of Contents – Volume 28, Number 8—August 2022

EID Search Options
presentation_01 Advanced Article Search – Search articles by author and/or keyword.
presentation_01 Articles by Country Search – Search articles by the topic country.
presentation_01 Article Type Search – Search articles by article type and issue.

Top

Comments

Please use the form below to submit correspondence to the authors or contact them at the following address:

Rüdiger D. Ollhoff, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciência Animal, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, Rua Imaculada Conceição, 1155 Prado Velho, Curitiba 80215 901, Paraná, Brazil

Send To

10000 character(s) remaining.

Top

Page created: July 11, 2022
Page updated: July 20, 2022
Page reviewed: July 20, 2022
The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.
file_external