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Volume 10, Number 12—December 2004
Research

Origin of the Amphibian Chytrid Fungus

Ché Weldon*Comments to Author , Louis H. du Preez*, Alex D. Hyatt†, Reinhold Muller‡, and Rick Speare‡
Author affiliations: *North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa; †CSIRO, Geelong, Australia; ‡James Cook University, Townsville, Australia

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Figure 3

Time bar indicating when chytridiomycosis first appeared in the major centers of occurrence in relation to each other. Following a 23-year interruption in occurrences after the Xenopus laevis infection in 1938, records outside Africa appear with increasing frequency up until the present; North America (22), Australia (2,23), South America (5), Central America (24), Europe (6), Oceania (New Zealand) (25).

Figure 3. Time bar indicating when chytridiomycosis first appeared in the major centers of occurrence in relation to each other. Following a 23-year interruption in occurrences after the Xenopus laevis infection in 1938, records outside Africa appear with increasing frequency up until the present; North America (22), Australia (2,23), South America (5), Central America (24), Europe (6), Oceania (New Zealand) (25).

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