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Volume 11, Number 8—August 2005
Research

HIV-1 Genetic Diversity in Antenatal Cohort, Canada

Bertine S. Akouamba*†, Janique Viel*, Hugues Charest‡, Natacha Merindol*†, Johanne Samson*, Normand Lapointe*†, Bluma G. Brenner§, Richard Lalonde¶, P. Richard Harrigan#, Marc Boucher*†, and Hugo Soudeyns*†Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *Hôpital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; †Université de Montréal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; ‡Institut National de Santé Publique du Québec, Sainte-Anne-de-Bellevue, Quebec, Canada; §Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; ¶McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; #British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

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Figure

Phylogenetic analysis of pol sequences derived from pregnant women infected with HIV-1. Trees were constructed by using the neighbor-joining method as described in Patients and Methods. A transition/transversion ratio of 2 was used and 1,000 bootstrap resamplings were performed. Left panel: Subgrouping with clade B HIV-1. Right panel: Grouping with non-B HIV. Reference sequences (REF) were obtained from the Los Alamos National Laboratory database (2001) (8). The scale bar represents 0.02 nucleot

Figure. . Phylogenetic analysis of pol sequences derived from pregnant women infected with HIV-1. Trees were constructed by using the neighbor-joining method as described in Patients and Methods. A transition/transversion ratio of 2 was used and 1,000 bootstrap resamplings were performed. Left panel: Subgrouping with clade B HIV-1. Right panel: Grouping with non-B HIV. Reference sequences (REF) were obtained from the Los Alamos National Laboratory database (2001) (8). The scale bar represents 0.02 nucleotide substitutions per site. Letter codes indicate country of origin. All nucleotide sequence information was submitted to GenBank (accession no. DQ059647–DQ059749). CRF, circulating recombinant form.

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