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Volume 13, Number 10—October 2007
Research

Evolutionary Relationships between Bat Coronaviruses and Their Hosts

Jie Cui*†1, Naijian Han‡1, Daniel Streicker§, Gang Li‡, Xianchun Tang*, Zhengli Shi¶, Zhihong Hu¶, Guoping Zhao#, Arnaud Fontanet**, Yi Guan††, Linfa Wang‡‡, Gareth Jones§§, Hume E. Field¶¶, Shuyi Zhang*Comments to Author , and Peter Daszak##Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *East China Normal University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; †Hebei Normal University, Hebei, People’s Republic of China; ‡Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People’s Republic of China; §University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA;; ¶Wuhan Institute of Virology, Wuhan, People’s Republic of China; #Shanghai Institutes of Biological Sciences, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; **Insitut Pasteur, Paris, France; ††University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region, People’s Republic of China; ‡‡Australian Animal Health Laboratory, Geelong, Victoria, Australia; §§University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom; ¶¶Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries, Yeerongpilly, Queensland, Australia; ##Consortium for Conservation Medicine, New York, New York, USA;

Main Article

Figure 3

Phylogenetic relationships between coronaviruses (left) and their host bat species added for reference (right). Abbreviations on both sides denote viruses harbored by bats (marked as V on the left) and bats (marked as B on the right). Rs, Rhinolophus sinicus; Mm, Miniopterus magnater; Sk, Scotophilus kuhlii; Rp, R. pearsoni; Mr, Myotis ricketti; Rf, R. ferrumequinum; Tp, Tylonycteris pachypus; Pp, Pipistrellus pipistrellus; Pa, P. abramus; Rm, R. macrotis. Values below branches are Bayesian posterior probabilities. Although some of these values are low, our analysis demonstrated a pathway for future study (28). Lines between the 2 trees were added to help visualize virus and host sequence congruence or incongruence.

Figure 3. Phylogenetic relationships between coronaviruses (left) and their host bat species added for reference (right). Abbreviations on both sides denote viruses harbored by bats (marked as V on the left) and bats (marked as B on the right). Rs, Rhinolophus sinicus; Mm, Miniopterus magnater; Sk, Scotophilus kuhlii; Rp, R. pearsoni; Mr, Myotis ricketti; Rf, R. ferrumequinum; Tp, Tylonycteris pachypus; Pp, Pipistrellus pipistrellus; Pa, P. abramus; Rm, R. macrotis. Values below branches are Bayesian posterior probabilities. Although some of these values are low, our analysis demonstrated a pathway for future study (28). Lines between the 2 trees were added to help visualize virus and host sequence congruence or incongruence.

Main Article

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1These authors contributed equally to this study.

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