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Volume 14, Number 2—February 2008
Research

Genetic Characterization of Feline Leukemia Virus from Florida Panthers

Meredith A. Brown*, Mark W. Cunningham†, Alfred L. Roca*‡§, Jennifer L. Troyer*§, Warren E. Johnson*, and Stephen J. O’Brien*Comments to Author 
Author affiliations: *National Cancer Institute, Frederick, Maryland, USA; †Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Gainesville, Florida, USA; ‡University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA; §SAIC-Frederick, Frederick, Maryland, USA;

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Figure 2

A) Diagram of the feline leukemia virus (FeLV) genome showing the PCR products obtained from FeLV-Pco env and long terminal repeat (LTR) genes. Envelope gene surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits, variable regions A and B (VRA and VRB) and the proline-rich region (PRR), 3’ LTR enhancer element(s) (hatched rectangle), signature 21-bp repeat(s) (gray shading), and putative c-Myb binding sites (black triangles) (12) are depicted for FeLV-945, FeLV-Pco, and FeLV-3281A . Unique signature amino acid residues found only in FeLV-945 and FeLV-Pco are marked by asterisks (see Figure 5). B) Primer pair PfeF6/PfeR6 was designed to detect all FeLV subgroups.

Figure 2. A) Diagram of the feline leukemia virus (FeLV) genome showing the PCR products obtained from FeLV-Pco env and long terminal repeat (LTR) genes. Envelope gene surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) subunits, variable regions A and B (VRA and VRB) and the proline-rich region (PRR), 3’ LTR enhancer element(s) (hatched rectangle), signature 21-bp repeat(s) (gray shading), and putative c-Myb binding sites (black triangles) (12) are depicted for FeLV-945, FeLV-Pco, and FeLV-3281A . Unique signature amino acid residues found only in FeLV-945 and FeLV-Pco are marked by asterisks (see Figure 5). B) Primer pair PfeF6/PfeR6 was designed to detect all FeLV subgroups.

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