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Volume 14, Number 5—May 2008
Dispatch

Serologic Evidence for Novel Poxvirus in Endangered Red Colobus Monkeys, Western Uganda

Tony L. Goldberg*Comments to Author , Colin A. Chapman†‡, Kenneth Cameron‡, Tania Saj†, William B. Karesh‡, Nathan D. Wolfe§, Scott W. Wong¶, Melissa E. Dubois¶, and Mark K. Slifka¶
Author affiliations: *University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois, USA; †McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada; ‡Wildlife Conservation Society, Bronx, New York, USA; §University of California, Los Angeles, California, USA; ¶Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA;

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Figure 1

Serologic characterization of red colobus to Orthopoxvirus antigens. Plasma samples were collected from 31 red colobus, and 10 samples with detectable antibody responses to vaccinia virus (VV) antigens (Appendix Figure) were chosen for further analysis. Plasma samples were tested for specificity by a postadsorption ELISA (7) in which samples were either unadsorbed or preadsorbed with monkeypox virus (MPV), vaccinia virus (VV), or cowpox virus (CPV) antigens prior to performing an ELISA on A) VV-, B) MPV-, or C) CPV-coated ELISA plates. The results obtained by using plasma from a VV-immune human study participant (VV human) and a MPV-immune participant (MPV human) are shown for comparison. The dashed line indicates the cut-off value for a seropositive antibody response (200 ELISA units). ND, not determined.

Figure 1. Serologic characterization of red colobus to Orthopoxvirus antigens. Plasma samples were collected from 31 red colobus, and 10 samples with detectable antibody responses to vaccinia virus (VV) antigens (Appendix Figure) were chosen for further analysis. Plasma samples were tested for specificity by a postadsorption ELISA (7) in which samples were either unadsorbed or preadsorbed with monkeypox virus (MPV), vaccinia virus (VV), or cowpox virus (CPV) antigens prior to performing an ELISA on A) VV-, B) MPV-, or C) CPV-coated ELISA plates. The results obtained by using plasma from a VV-immune human study participant (VV human) and a MPV-immune participant (MPV human) are shown for comparison. The dashed line indicates the cut-off value for a seropositive antibody response (200 ELISA units). ND, not determined.

Main Article

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