Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options Skip directly to A-Z link Skip directly to A-Z link Skip directly to A-Z link
Volume 16, Number 6—June 2010
Dispatch

Transfer of Carbapenem-Resistant Plasmid from Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258 to Escherichia coli in Patient

Moran G. Goren, Yehuda Carmeli, Mitchell J. Schwaber, Inna Chmelnitsky, Vered Schechner, and Shiri Navon-VeneziaComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel (M.G. Goren, Y. Carmeli, I. Chmelnitsky, V. Schechner, S. Navon-Venezia); National Center for Infection Control, Tel Aviv (Y. Carmeli, M.J. Schwaber, S. Navon-Venezia)

Main Article

Figure 1

A) Analysis of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)–encoding plasmids in isolates Kpn1 (1), Eco2 (3), Kpn1-T (2), and Eco2-T (4), Israel, 2008. Plasmid size estimation was performed by digestion of DNA with S1 nuclease (20 U; Promega, Madison, WI, USA) followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with the CHEF-DR III apparatus (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc., Hercules, CA, USA), as described (8–11). Lambda ladder PFG marker (New England Biolabs, Beverly, MA, USA) was used as a molecular

Figure 1. A) Analysis of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)–encoding plasmids in isolates Kpn1 (1), Eco2 (3), Kpn1-T (2), and Eco2-T (4), Israel, 2008. Plasmid size estimation was performed by digestion of DNA with S1 nuclease (20 U; Promega, Madison, WI, USA) followed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) with the CHEF-DR III apparatus (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc., Hercules, CA, USA), as described (811). Lambda ladder PFG marker (New England Biolabs, Beverly, MA, USA) was used as a molecular size marker (lane M). B) Restriction fragment length polymorphism of the KPC-3–encoding plasmid from Kpn1-T (K) and Eco2-T (E). Plasmid DNA was digested with BamHI, BglII, EcoRI, and SacI endonucleases (New England Biolabs) and underwent PFGE on a 1% agarose gel. The level of similarity between restriction patterns was calculated by using GelcomparII software version 5 (Applied Maths, Kortrigk, Belgium). Lane 1, 1-kb DNA ladder (New England Biolabs). C) Southern blot analysis of plasmid DNA hybridized with blaKPC-3-labeled probe. Plasmid restriction products were transferred to a Hybond N+ membrane (Amersham Biosciences, Little Chalfont, United Kingdom), cross-linked with UV light, and hybridized with a blaKPC-3-labeled probe (892-bp product of blaKPC-3).

Main Article

References
  1. Yigit  H, Queenan  AM, Anderson  GJ, Domenech-Sanchez A, Biddle JW, Steward CD, et al. Novel carbapenem-hydrolyzing beta-lactamase, KPC-1, from a carbapenem-resistant strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2001;45:115161. DOIPubMed
  2. Kitchel  B, Rasheed  JK, Patel  JB, Srinivasan A, Navon-Venezia S, Carmeli Y, et al. Molecular epidemiology of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates in the United States: clonal expansion of multilocus sequence type 258. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2009;53:336570. DOIPubMed
  3. Woodford  N, Zhang  J, Warner  M, Kaufmann ME, Matos J, Macdonald A, et al. Arrival of Klebsiella pneumoniae producing KPC carbapenemase in the United Kingdom. J Antimicrob Chemother. 2008;62:12614. DOIPubMed
  4. Leavitt  A, Navon-Venezia  S, Chmelnitsky  I, Schwaber  MJ, Carmeli  Y. Emergence of KPC-2 and KPC-3 in carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains in an Israeli hospital. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2007;51:30269. DOIPubMed
  5. Schwaber  MJ, Klarfeld-Lidji  S, Navon-Venezia  S, Schwartz  D, Leavitt  A, Carmeli  Y. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2008;52:102833.Predictors of carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae acquisition among hospitalized adults and effect of acquisition on mortality. DOIPubMed
  6. Schwaber  MJ, Carmeli  Y. Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae: a potential threat.JAMA. 2008;300:29113.
  7. Navon-Venezia  S, Chmelnitsky  I, Leavitt  A, Schwaber  MJ, Schwartz  D, Carmeli  Y. Plasmid-mediated imipenem-hydrolyzing enzyme KPC-2 among multiple carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli clones in Israel. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2006;50:3098101. DOIPubMed
  8. Noller  AC, McEllistrem  MC, Stine  OC, Morris JG Jr, Boxrud DJ, Dixon B, et al. Multilocus sequence typing reveals a lack of diversity among Escherichia coli O157:H7 isolates that are distinct by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. J Clin Microbiol. 2003;41:6759. DOIPubMed
  9. Schlesinger  J, Navon-Venezia  S, Chmelnitsky  I, Hammer-Münz O, Leavitt A, Gold HS, et al. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases among Enterobacter isolates obtained in Tel Aviv, Israel. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2005;49:11506. DOIPubMed
  10. Barton  BM, Harding  GP, Zuccarelli  AJ. A general method for detecting and sizing large plasmids. Anal Biochem. 1995;226:23540. DOIPubMed
  11. Li  L, Lim  CK. A novel large plasmid carrying multiple beta-lactam resistance genes isolated from a Klebsiella pneumoniae strain. J Appl Microbiol. 2000;88:103848. DOIPubMed
  12. Navon-Venezia  S, Leavitt  A, Schwaber  MJ, Rasheed JK, Srinivasan A, Patel JB, et al. First report on a hyperepidemic clone of KPC-3-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae in Israel genetically related to a strain causing outbreaks in the United States. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2009;53:81820. DOIPubMed
  13. Leavitt  A, Chmelnitsky  I, Ofek  I, Carmeli  Y, Navon-Venezia  S. Plasmid pKpQIL harboring KPC-3 and TEM-1 renders carbapenem resistance in extremely drug resistant epidemic Klebsiella pneumoniae. J Antimicrob Chemother. 2009. In press.PubMed
  14. Naas  T, Cuzon  G, Villegas  MV, Lartigue  MF, Quinn  JP, Nordmann  P. Genetic structures at the origin of acquisition of the beta-lactamase blaKPC gene. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2008;52:125763. DOIPubMed
  15. Wielders  CL, Vriens  MR, Brisse  S, de Graaf-Miltenburg  LA, Troelstra  A, Fleer  A, Evidence for in-vivo transfer of mecA DNA between strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Lancet. 2001;357:16745. DOIPubMed

Main Article

Page created: February 10, 2011
Page updated: February 10, 2011
Page reviewed: February 10, 2011
The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.
file_external