Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options Skip directly to A-Z link Skip directly to A-Z link Skip directly to A-Z link
Volume 17, Number 4—April 2011
Letter

Sequence Analysis of Feline Coronaviruses and the Circulating Virulent/Avirulent Theory

Hui-Wen Chang, Herman F. Egberink, and Peter J.M. RottierComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Author affiliation: Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands

Main Article

Figure

A) Phylogenetic relationships of feline coronaviruses (FCoVs) detected in feces of healthy cats and in organs/ascites of cats with feline infectious peritonitis. Alignment of the matrix (M) gene sequences was used to generate a rooted neighbor-joining tree with the M gene sequence of canine coronavirus strain NJ17 (Genbank accession no. AY704917) as outgroup. Bootstrap confidence values (percentages of 1,000 replicates) are indicated at the relevant branching points. Branch lengths are drawn to

Figure. A) Phylogenetic relationships of feline coronaviruses (FCoVs) detected in feces of healthy cats and in organs/ascites of cats with feline infectious peritonitis. Alignment of the matrix (M) gene sequences was used to generate a rooted neighbor-joining tree with the M gene sequence of canine coronavirus strain NJ17 (Genbank accession no. AY704917) as outgroup. Bootstrap confidence values (percentages of 1,000 replicates) are indicated at the relevant branching points. Branch lengths are drawn to scale; scale bar indicates 0.02 nucleotide substitutions per site. Viruses detected in cattery animals are indicated by a cattery designation after the virus identification number. B) Alignment of amino acid sequences of partial M proteins of the FCoVs from panel A, as compared with a feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) reference sequence (top line) published by Brown et al. (9) (GenBank accession no. EU664166), and with 8 American FCoV sequences (bottom) published by Pedersen et al. (8). The 5 aa residues at positions 108, 120, 138, 163, and 199, suggested by Brown et al. (9) as potential diagnostic sites, are boxed.

Main Article

References
  1. Addie  D, Belák  S, Boucraut-Baralon  C, Egberink  H, Frymus  T, Gruffydd-Jones  T, Feline infectious peritonitis. ABCD guidelines on prevention and management. J Feline Med Surg. 2009;11:594604. DOIPubMed
  2. de Groot  RJ, Horzinek  MC. Feline infectious peritonitis. In: The Coronaviridae. Siddell SG, editor. New York: Plenum Press; 1995. p. 293–309.
  3. Haijema  BJ, Rottier  PJ, de Groot  RJ. Feline coronaviruses: a tale of two-faced types. In: Thiel V, editor. Coronaviruses. Molecular and cellular biology. Norfolk (UK): Academic Press; 2007. p. 183–203.
  4. Pedersen  NC. A review of feline infectious peritonitis virus infection: 1963-2008. J Feline Med Surg. 2009;11:22558. DOIPubMed
  5. Herrewegh  AA, Vennema  H, Horzinek  MC, Rottier  PJM, de Groot  RJ. The molecular genetics of feline coronaviruses: comparative sequence analysis of the ORF7a/7b transcription unit of different biotypes. Virology. 1995;212:62231. DOIPubMed
  6. Poland  AM, Vennema  H, Foley  JE, Pedersen  NC. Two related strains of feline infectious peritonitis virus isolated from immunocompromised cats infected with a feline enteric coronavirus. J Clin Microbiol. 1996;34:31804.PubMed
  7. Vennema  H, Poland  A, Foley  J, Pedersen  NC. Feline infectious peritonitis viruses arise by mutation from endemic feline enteric coronaviruses. Virology. 1998;243:1507. DOIPubMed
  8. Pedersen  NC, Liu  H, Dodd  KA, Pesavento  PA. Significance of coronavirus mutants in feces and diseased tissues of cats suffering from feline infectious peritonitis. Viruses. 2009;1:16684. DOI
  9. Brown  MA, Troyer  JL, Pecon-Slattery  J, Roelke  ME, O’Brien  SJ. Genetics and pathogenesis of feline infectious peritonitis virus. Emerg Infect Dis. 2009;15:144552. DOIPubMed
  10. Chang  HW, de Groot  RJ, Egberink  HF, Rottier  PJ. Feline infectious peritonitis: insights into feline coronavirus pathobiogenesis and epidemiology based on genetic analysis of the viral 3c gene. J Gen Virol. 2010;91:41520. DOIPubMed

Main Article

Page created: July 29, 2011
Page updated: July 29, 2011
Page reviewed: July 29, 2011
The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.
file_external