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Volume 18, Number 4—April 2012
Letter

Serologic Evidence of Orthopoxvirus Infection in Buffaloes, Brazil

Felipe Lopes de Assis1, Graziele Pereira1, Cairo Oliveira, Gisele Olinto Libânio Rodrigues, Marcela Menezas Gomes Cotta, Andre Tavares Silva-Fernandes, Paulo Cesar Peregrino Ferreira, Cláudio Antônio Bonjardim, Giliane de Souza Trindade, Erna Geessien Kroon, and Jônatas Santos AbrahãoComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil

Main Article

Table

Results of testing for orthopoxvirus seropositivity in milk buffalo herds, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, October 2010*

Test No. (%) samples
PRNT
Total positive 15 (31.2)
Titer
20 6 (40.0)
40 5 (33.3)
80 2 (13.3)
160 2 (13.3)
Total negative 33 (68.7)
ELISA
Total positive 17 (35.4)
Total negative 31 (64.6)
PRNT and ELISA positive 14 (29.2)

*Serum samples were collected from 48 female buffaloes used for milk production. A positive titer was defined as the highest dilution that inhibited >70% of viral plaques relative to the level of inhibition of the negative controls. Samples also underwent ELISA for orthopoxvirus IgG as described (4). PRNT, plaque-reduction neutralization test.

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References
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1These authors contributed equally to this article.

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Page updated: March 16, 2012
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