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Volume 22, Number 1—January 2016
Etymologia

Etymologia: Elizabethkingia

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Elizabethkingia [e-lizʺə-beth-kingʹe-ə]

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Thumbnail of Six-day-old blood agar growth of Elizabethkingia meningioseptica with 5 μg vancomycin (with zone of clearing) and 10 μg colistin disks. Source: Dr. Saptarshi via Wikimedia Commons

Figure. Six-day-old blood agar growth of Elizabethkingia meningioseptica with 5 μg vancomycin (with zone of clearing) and 10 μg colistin disks. Source: Dr. Saptarshi via Wikimedia Commons

Named for Elizabeth O. King, a bacteriologist at the US Centers for Disease Control who studied meningitis in infants, Elizabethkingia meningoseptica is a gram-negative, obligate aerobic bacterium in the family Flavobacteriaceae (Figure). King named the bacterium Flavobacterium (from the Latin flavus, “yellow”) meningosepticum, and in 1994 it was reclassified in the genus Chryseobacterium (from the Greek chryseos, “golden”). In 2005, it was placed in the new genus Elizabethkingia.

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References

  1. Johnson  H, Burd  EM, Sharp  SE. Answer to photo quiz: Elizabethkingia meningoseptica. J Clin Microbiol. 2011;49:4421. DOI
  2. Kim  KK, Kim  MK, Lim  JH, Park  HY, Lee  ST. Transfer of Chryseobacterium meningosepticum and Chryseobacterium miricola to Elizabethkingia gen nov. as Elizabethkingia meningoseptica comb. nov. and Elizabethkingia miricola comb. nov. Int J Syst Evol Microbiol. 2005;55:128793 and. DOIPubMed
  3. King  EO. Studies on a group of previously unclassified bacteria associated with meningitis in infants. Am J Clin Pathol. 1959;31:2417 .PubMed

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DOI: 10.3201/eid2201.et2201

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Table of Contents – Volume 22, Number 1—January 2016

Page created: December 18, 2015
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