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Volume 22, Number 1—January 2016

Volume 22, Number 1—January 2016   PDF Version [PDF - 8.48 MB - 168 pages]

Synopses

  • Medscape CME Activity
    Epidemiology of Haemophilus ducreyi Infections PDF Version [PDF - 1.12 MB - 8 pages]
    C. González-Beiras et al.
    View Summary

    Infections are at their lowest level worldwide, but nongenital cutaneous infections have increased.

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    The global epidemiology of Haemophilus ducreyi infections is poorly documented because of difficulties in confirming microbiological diagnoses. We evaluated published data on the proportion of genital and nongenital skin ulcers caused by H. ducreyi before and after introduction of syndromic management for genital ulcer disease (GUD). Before 2000, the proportion of GUD caused by H. ducreyi ranged from 0.0% to 69.0% (35 studies in 25 countries). After 2000, the proportion ranged from 0.0% to 15.0% (14 studies in 13 countries). In contrast, H. ducreyi has been recently identified as a causative agent of skin ulcers in children in the tropical regions; proportions ranged from 9.0% to 60.0% (6 studies in 4 countries). We conclude that, although there has been a sustained reduction in the proportion of GUD caused by H. ducreyi, this bacterium is increasingly recognized as a major cause of nongenital cutaneous ulcers.

        Cite This Article
    EID González-Beiras C, Marks M, Chen CY, Roberts S, Mitjà O. Epidemiology of Haemophilus ducreyi Infections. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):1-8. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150425
    AMA González-Beiras C, Marks M, Chen CY, et al. Epidemiology of Haemophilus ducreyi Infections. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):1-8. doi:10.3201/eid2201.150425.
    APA González-Beiras, C., Marks, M., Chen, C. Y., Roberts, S., & Mitjà, O. (2016). Epidemiology of Haemophilus ducreyi Infections. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 1-8. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150425.
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Research

  • Multiorgan WU Polyomavirus Infection in Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient PDF Version [PDF - 617 KB - 8 pages]
    E. A. Siebrasse et al.
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    Virus was detected in the lung and trachea of a deceased patient.

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    WU polyomavirus (WUPyV) was detected in a bone marrow transplant recipient with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome who died in 2001. Crystalline lattices of polyomavirus-like particles were observed in the patient’s lung by electron microscopy. WUPyV was detected in the lung and other tissues by real-time quantitative PCR and identified in the lung and trachea by immunohistochemistry. A subset of WUPyV-positive cells in the lung had morphologic features of macrophages. Although the role of WUPyV as a human pathogen remains unclear, these results clearly demonstrate evidence for infection of respiratory tract tissues in this patient.

        Cite This Article
    EID Siebrasse EA, Nguyen NL, Willby MJ, Erdman DD, Menegus MA, Wang D, et al. Multiorgan WU Polyomavirus Infection in Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):24-31. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151384
    AMA Siebrasse EA, Nguyen NL, Willby MJ, et al. Multiorgan WU Polyomavirus Infection in Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):24-31. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151384.
    APA Siebrasse, E. A., Nguyen, N. L., Willby, M. J., Erdman, D. D., Menegus, M. A., & Wang, D. (2016). Multiorgan WU Polyomavirus Infection in Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 24-31. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151384.
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  • Human Papillomavirus Prevalence and Herd Immunity after Introduction of Vaccination Program, Scotland, 2009–2013 PDF Version [PDF - 527 KB - 9 pages]
    R. L. Cameron et al.
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    Prevalence was reduced, and early evidence indicates herd immunity.

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    In 2008, a national human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization program using a bivalent vaccine against HPV types 16 and 18 was implemented in Scotland along with a national surveillance program designed to determine the longitudinal effects of vaccination on HPV infection at the population level. Each year during 2009–2013, the surveillance program conducted HPV testing on a proportion of liquid-based cytology samples from women undergoing their first cervical screening test for precancerous cervical disease. By linking vaccination, cervical screening, and HPV testing data, over the study period we found a decline in HPV types 16 and 18, significant decreases in HPV types 31, 33, and 45 (suggesting cross-protection), and a nonsignificant increase in HPV 51. In addition, among nonvaccinated women, HPV types 16 and 18 infections were significantly lower in 2013 than in 2009. Our results preliminarily indicate herd immunity and sustained effectiveness of the bivalent vaccine on virologic outcomes at the population level.

        Cite This Article
    EID Cameron RL, Kavanagh K, Pan J, Love J, Cuschieri K, Robertson C, et al. Human Papillomavirus Prevalence and Herd Immunity after Introduction of Vaccination Program, Scotland, 2009–2013. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):56-64. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150736
    AMA Cameron RL, Kavanagh K, Pan J, et al. Human Papillomavirus Prevalence and Herd Immunity after Introduction of Vaccination Program, Scotland, 2009–2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):56-64. doi:10.3201/eid2201.150736.
    APA Cameron, R. L., Kavanagh, K., Pan, J., Love, J., Cuschieri, K., Robertson, C....Pollock, K. (2016). Human Papillomavirus Prevalence and Herd Immunity after Introduction of Vaccination Program, Scotland, 2009–2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 56-64. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150736.
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  • Medscape CME Activity
    Falling Plasmodium knowlesi Malaria Death Rate among Adults despite Rising Incidence, Sabah, Malaysia, 2010–2014 PDF Version [PDF - 857 KB - 8 pages]
    G. S. Rajahram et al.
    View Summary

    The decreased notification-fatality rate is likely associated with improved use of intravenous artesunate for severe malaria.

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    Deaths from Plasmodium knowlesi malaria have been linked to delayed parenteral treatment. In Malaysia, early intravenous artesunate is now recommended for all severe malaria cases. We describe P. knowlesi fatalities in Sabah, Malaysia, during 2012–2014 and report species-specific fatality rates based on 2010–2014 case notifications. Sixteen malaria-associated deaths (caused by PCR-confirmed P. knowlesi [7], P. falciparum [7], and P. vivax [1] and microscopy-diagnosed “P. malariae” [1]) were reported during 2012–2014. Six patients with severe P. knowlesi malaria received intravenous artesunate at hospital admission. For persons >15 years of age, overall fatality rates during 2010–2014 were 3.4, 4.2, and 1.0 deaths/1,000 P. knowlesi, P. falciparum, and P. vivax notifications, respectively; P. knowlesi–associated fatality rates fell from 9.2 to1.6 deaths/1,000 notifications. No P. knowlesi–associated deaths occurred among children, despite 373 notified cases. Although P. knowlesi malaria incidence is rising, the notification-fatality rate has decreased, likely due to improved use of intravenous artesunate.

        Cite This Article
    EID Rajahram GS, Barber BE, William T, Grigg MJ, Menon J, Yeo TW, et al. Falling Plasmodium knowlesi Malaria Death Rate among Adults despite Rising Incidence, Sabah, Malaysia, 2010–2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):41-48. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151305
    AMA Rajahram GS, Barber BE, William T, et al. Falling Plasmodium knowlesi Malaria Death Rate among Adults despite Rising Incidence, Sabah, Malaysia, 2010–2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):41-48. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151305.
    APA Rajahram, G. S., Barber, B. E., William, T., Grigg, M. J., Menon, J., Yeo, T. W....Anstey, N. M. (2016). Falling Plasmodium knowlesi Malaria Death Rate among Adults despite Rising Incidence, Sabah, Malaysia, 2010–2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 41-48. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151305.
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  • Multifacility Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome in Taif, Saudi Arabia PDF Version [PDF - 1.12 MB - 9 pages]
    A. M. Assiri et al.
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    Enhanced surveillance and infection-control practices are needed to prevent outbreaks in healthcare settings.

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    Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a novel respiratory pathogen first reported in 2012. During September 2014–January 2015, an outbreak of 38 cases of MERS was reported from 4 healthcare facilities in Taif, Saudi Arabia; 21 of the 38 case-patients died. Clinical and public health records showed that 13 patients were healthcare personnel (HCP). Fifteen patients, including 4 HCP, were associated with 1 dialysis unit. Three additional HCP in this dialysis unit had serologic evidence of MERS-CoV infection. Viral RNA was amplified from acute-phase serum specimens of 15 patients, and full spike gene-coding sequencing was obtained from 10 patients who formed a discrete cluster; sequences from specimens of 9 patients were closely related. Similar gene sequences among patients unlinked by time or location suggest unrecognized viral transmission. Circulation persisted in multiple healthcare settings over an extended period, underscoring the importance of strengthening MERS-CoV surveillance and infection-control practices.

        Cite This Article
    EID Assiri AM, Abedi GR, Saeed AA, Abdalla MA, al-Masry M, Choudhry A, et al. Multifacility Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome in Taif, Saudi Arabia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):32-40. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151370
    AMA Assiri AM, Abedi GR, Saeed AA, et al. Multifacility Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome in Taif, Saudi Arabia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):32-40. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151370.
    APA Assiri, A. M., Abedi, G. R., Saeed, A. A., Abdalla, M. A., al-Masry, M., Choudhry, A....Watson, J. T. (2016). Multifacility Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome in Taif, Saudi Arabia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 32-40. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151370.
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  • Risk Factors for Primary Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Illness in Humans, Saudi Arabia, 2014 PDF Version [PDF - 449 KB - 7 pages]
    B. M. Alraddadi et al.
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    Direct exposure to camels, diabetes mellitus, heart disease, and smoking were independently associated with this illness.

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    Risk factors for primary Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) illness in humans are incompletely understood. We identified all primary MERS-CoV cases reported in Saudi Arabia during March–November 2014 by excluding those with history of exposure to other cases of MERS-CoV or acute respiratory illness of unknown cause or exposure to healthcare settings within 14 days before illness onset. Using a case–control design, we assessed differences in underlying medical conditions and environmental exposures among primary case-patients and 2–4 controls matched by age, sex, and neighborhood. Using multivariable analysis, we found that direct exposure to dromedary camels during the 2 weeks before illness onset, as well as diabetes mellitus, heart disease, and smoking, were each independently associated with MERS-CoV illness. Further investigation is needed to better understand animal-to-human transmission of MERS-CoV.

        Cite This Article
    EID Alraddadi BM, Watson JT, Almarashi A, Abedi GR, Turkistani A, Sadran M, et al. Risk Factors for Primary Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Illness in Humans, Saudi Arabia, 2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):49-55. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151340
    AMA Alraddadi BM, Watson JT, Almarashi A, et al. Risk Factors for Primary Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Illness in Humans, Saudi Arabia, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):49-55. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151340.
    APA Alraddadi, B. M., Watson, J. T., Almarashi, A., Abedi, G. R., Turkistani, A., Sadran, M....Madani, T. A. (2016). Risk Factors for Primary Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Illness in Humans, Saudi Arabia, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 49-55. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151340.
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  • Waterborne Elizabethkingia meningoseptica in Adult Critical Care PDF Version [PDF - 594 KB - 9 pages]
    L. Moore et al.
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    This outbreak might reflect improved diagnostic testing, indicating that E. meningoseptica is a pseudo-emerging pathogen.

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    Elizabethkingia meningoseptica is an infrequent colonizer of the respiratory tract; its pathogenicity is uncertain. In the context of a 22-month outbreak of E. meningoseptica acquisition affecting 30 patients in a London, UK, critical care unit (3% attack rate) we derived a measure of attributable morbidity and determined whether E. meningoseptica is an emerging nosocomial pathogen. We found monomicrobial E. meningoseptica acquisition (n = 13) to have an attributable morbidity rate of 54% (systemic inflammatory response syndrome >2, rising C-reactive protein, new radiographic changes), suggesting that E. meningoseptica is a pathogen. Epidemiologic and molecular evidence showed acquisition was water-source–associated in critical care but identified numerous other E. meningoseptica strains, indicating more widespread distribution than previously considered. Analysis of changes in gram-negative speciation rates across a wider London hospital network suggests this outbreak, and possibly other recently reported outbreaks, might reflect improved diagnostics and that E. meningoseptica thus is a pseudo-emerging pathogen.

        Cite This Article
    EID Moore L, Owens DS, Jepson A, Turton JF, Ashworth S, Donaldson H, et al. Waterborne Elizabethkingia meningoseptica in Adult Critical Care. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):9-17. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150139
    AMA Moore L, Owens DS, Jepson A, et al. Waterborne Elizabethkingia meningoseptica in Adult Critical Care. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):9-17. doi:10.3201/eid2201.150139.
    APA Moore, L., Owens, D. S., Jepson, A., Turton, J. F., Ashworth, S., Donaldson, H....Holmes, A. H. (2016). Waterborne Elizabethkingia meningoseptica in Adult Critical Care. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 9-17. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150139.
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  • Human Papillomavirus Vaccination at a Time of Changing Sexual Behavior PDF Version [PDF - 390 KB - 6 pages]
    I. Baussano et al.
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    Early vaccination may prevent infections in populations undergoing age-specific changes in sexual activity.

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    Human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence varies widely worldwide. We used a transmission model to show links between age-specific sexual patterns and HPV vaccination effectiveness. We considered rural India and the United States as examples of 2 heterosexual populations with traditional age-specific sexual behavior and gender-similar age-specific sexual behavior, respectively. We simulated these populations by using age-specific rates of sexual activity and age differences between sexual partners and found that transitions from traditional to gender-similar sexual behavior in women <35 years of age can result in increased (2.6-fold in our study) HPV16 prevalence. Our model shows that reductions in HPV16 prevalence are larger if vaccination occurs in populations before transitions in sexual behavior and that increased risk for HPV infection attributable to transition is preventable by early vaccination. Our study highlights the importance of using time-limited opportunities to introduce HPV vaccination in traditional populations before changes in age-specific sexual patterns occur.

        Cite This Article
    EID Baussano I, Lazzarato F, Brisson M, Franceschi S. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination at a Time of Changing Sexual Behavior. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):18-23. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150791
    AMA Baussano I, Lazzarato F, Brisson M, et al. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination at a Time of Changing Sexual Behavior. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):18-23. doi:10.3201/eid2201.150791.
    APA Baussano, I., Lazzarato, F., Brisson, M., & Franceschi, S. (2016). Human Papillomavirus Vaccination at a Time of Changing Sexual Behavior. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 18-23. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150791.
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Dispatches

  • Severe Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection with Acinetobacter ursingii in Person who Injects Drugs PDF Version [PDF - 374 KB - 4 pages]
    H. Salzer et al.
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    We report a community-acquired bloodstream infection with Acinteobacter ursingii in an HIV-negative woman who injected drugs. The infection was successfully treated with meropenem. Species identification was performed by using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Improved identification of Acinetobacter spp. by using this method will help identify clinical effects of this underdiagnosed pathogen.

        Cite This Article
    EID Salzer H, Rolling T, Schmiedel S, Klupp E, Lange C, Seifert H, et al. Severe Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection with Acinetobacter ursingii in Person who Injects Drugs. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):134-137. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151298
    AMA Salzer H, Rolling T, Schmiedel S, et al. Severe Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection with Acinetobacter ursingii in Person who Injects Drugs. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):134-137. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151298.
    APA Salzer, H., Rolling, T., Schmiedel, S., Klupp, E., Lange, C., & Seifert, H. (2016). Severe Community-Acquired Bloodstream Infection with Acinetobacter ursingii in Person who Injects Drugs. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 134-137. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151298.
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  • Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Infection in 2 Travelers Returning from China to Canada, January 2015 PDF Version [PDF - 483 KB - 4 pages]
    D. M. Skowronski et al.
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    In January 2015, British Columbia, Canada, reported avian influenza A(H7N9) virus infection in 2 travelers returning from China who sought outpatient care for typical influenza-like illness. There was no further spread, but serosurvey findings showed broad population susceptibility to H7N9 virus. Travel history and timely notification are critical to emerging pathogen detection and response.

        Cite This Article
    EID Skowronski DM, Chambers C, Gustafson R, Purych DB, Tang P, Bastien N, et al. Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Infection in 2 Travelers Returning from China to Canada, January 2015. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):71-74. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151330
    AMA Skowronski DM, Chambers C, Gustafson R, et al. Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Infection in 2 Travelers Returning from China to Canada, January 2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):71-74. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151330.
    APA Skowronski, D. M., Chambers, C., Gustafson, R., Purych, D. B., Tang, P., Bastien, N....Li, Y. (2016). Avian Influenza A(H7N9) Virus Infection in 2 Travelers Returning from China to Canada, January 2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 71-74. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151330.
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  • Variations in Spike Glycoprotein Gene of MERS-CoV, South Korea, 2015 PDF Version [PDF - 643 KB - 5 pages]
    D. Kim et al.
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    An outbreak of nosocomial infections with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus occurred in South Korea in May 2015. Spike glycoprotein genes of virus strains from South Korea were closely related to those of strains from Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. However, virus strains from South Korea showed strain-specific variations.

        Cite This Article
    EID Kim D, Kim Y, Park S, Yun M, Yang J, Kang H, et al. Variations in Spike Glycoprotein Gene of MERS-CoV, South Korea, 2015. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):100-104. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151055
    AMA Kim D, Kim Y, Park S, et al. Variations in Spike Glycoprotein Gene of MERS-CoV, South Korea, 2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):100-104. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151055.
    APA Kim, D., Kim, Y., Park, S., Yun, M., Yang, J., Kang, H....Kim, S. (2016). Variations in Spike Glycoprotein Gene of MERS-CoV, South Korea, 2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 100-104. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151055.
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  • Asymptomatic Lymphogranuloma Venereum in Men who Have Sex with Men, United Kingdom PDF Version [PDF - 398 KB - 5 pages]
    C. Saxon et al.
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    We investigated prevalence of lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) among men who have sex with men who were tested for chlamydia at 12 clinics in the United Kingdom during 10 weeks in 2012. Of 713 men positive for Chlamydia trachomatis, 66 (9%) had LGV serovars; 15 (27%) of 55 for whom data were available were asymptomatic.

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    EID Saxon C, Hughes G, Ison C. Asymptomatic Lymphogranuloma Venereum in Men who Have Sex with Men, United Kingdom. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):112-116. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.141867
    AMA Saxon C, Hughes G, Ison C. Asymptomatic Lymphogranuloma Venereum in Men who Have Sex with Men, United Kingdom. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):112-116. doi:10.3201/eid2201.141867.
    APA Saxon, C., Hughes, G., & Ison, C. (2016). Asymptomatic Lymphogranuloma Venereum in Men who Have Sex with Men, United Kingdom. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 112-116. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.141867.
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  • Rift Valley Fever Virus among Wild Ruminants, Etosha National Park, Namibia, 2011 PDF Version [PDF - 304 KB - 3 pages]
    A. Dondona et al.
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    After a May 2011 outbreak of Rift Valley fever among livestock northeast of Etosha National Park, Namibia, wild ruminants in the park were tested for the virus. Antibodies were detected in springbok, wildebeest, and black-faced impala, and viral RNA was detected in springbok. Seroprevalence was high, and immune response was long lasting.

        Cite This Article
    EID Dondona A, Aschenborn O, Pinoni C, Di Gialleonardo L, Maseke A, Bortone G, et al. Rift Valley Fever Virus among Wild Ruminants, Etosha National Park, Namibia, 2011. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):128-130. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150725
    AMA Dondona A, Aschenborn O, Pinoni C, et al. Rift Valley Fever Virus among Wild Ruminants, Etosha National Park, Namibia, 2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):128-130. doi:10.3201/eid2201.150725.
    APA Dondona, A., Aschenborn, O., Pinoni, C., Di Gialleonardo, L., Maseke, A., Bortone, G....Monaco, F. (2016). Rift Valley Fever Virus among Wild Ruminants, Etosha National Park, Namibia, 2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 128-130. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150725.
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  • Identification of Source of Brucella suis Infection in Human by Whole-Genome Sequencing, United States and Tonga PDF Version [PDF - 519 KB - 4 pages]
    C. Quance et al.
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    Brucella suis infection was diagnosed in a man from Tonga, Polynesia, who had butchered swine in Oregon, USA. Although the US commercial swine herd is designated brucellosis-free, exposure history suggested infection from commercial pigs. We used whole-genome sequencing to determine that the man was infected in Tonga, averting a field investigation.

        Cite This Article
    EID Quance C, Robbe-Austerman S, Stuber T, Brignole T, DeBess EE, Boyd L, et al. Identification of Source of Brucella suis Infection in Human by Whole-Genome Sequencing, United States and Tonga. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):79-82. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150843
    AMA Quance C, Robbe-Austerman S, Stuber T, et al. Identification of Source of Brucella suis Infection in Human by Whole-Genome Sequencing, United States and Tonga. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):79-82. doi:10.3201/eid2201.150843.
    APA Quance, C., Robbe-Austerman, S., Stuber, T., Brignole, T., DeBess, E. E., Boyd, L....Erdman, M. M. (2016). Identification of Source of Brucella suis Infection in Human by Whole-Genome Sequencing, United States and Tonga. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 79-82. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150843.
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  • Seroepidemiology of Human Enterovirus 71 Infection among Children, Cambodia PDF Version [PDF - 386 KB - 4 pages]
    P. F. Horwood et al.
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    Enterovirus 71 is reported to have emerged in Cambodia in 2012; at least 54 children with severe encephalitis died during that outbreak. We used serum samples collected during 2000–2011 to show that the virus had been widespread in the country for at least a decade before the 2012 outbreak.

        Cite This Article
    EID Horwood PF, Andronico A, Tarantola A, Salje H, Duong V, Mey C, et al. Seroepidemiology of Human Enterovirus 71 Infection among Children, Cambodia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):92-95. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151323
    AMA Horwood PF, Andronico A, Tarantola A, et al. Seroepidemiology of Human Enterovirus 71 Infection among Children, Cambodia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):92-95. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151323.
    APA Horwood, P. F., Andronico, A., Tarantola, A., Salje, H., Duong, V., Mey, C....Buchy, P. (2016). Seroepidemiology of Human Enterovirus 71 Infection among Children, Cambodia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 92-95. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151323.
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  • Effectiveness of Ring Vaccination as Control Strategy for Ebola Virus Disease PDF Version [PDF - 463 KB - 4 pages]
    A. J. Kucharski et al.
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    Using an Ebola virus disease transmission model, we found that addition of ring vaccination at the outset of the West Africa epidemic might not have led to containment of this disease. However, in later stages of the epidemic or in outbreaks with less intense transmission or more effective control, this strategy could help eliminate the disease.

        Cite This Article
    EID Kucharski AJ, Eggo RM, Watson C, Camacho A, Funk S, Edmunds W, et al. Effectiveness of Ring Vaccination as Control Strategy for Ebola Virus Disease. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):105-108. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151410
    AMA Kucharski AJ, Eggo RM, Watson C, et al. Effectiveness of Ring Vaccination as Control Strategy for Ebola Virus Disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):105-108. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151410.
    APA Kucharski, A. J., Eggo, R. M., Watson, C., Camacho, A., Funk, S., & Edmunds, W. (2016). Effectiveness of Ring Vaccination as Control Strategy for Ebola Virus Disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 105-108. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151410.
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  • Increase in Sexually Transmitted Infections among Men Who Have Sex with Men, England, 2014 PDF Version [PDF - 548 KB - 4 pages]
    H. Mohammed et al.
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    Surveillance data from sexual health clinics indicate recent increases in sexually transmitted infections, particularly among men who have sex with men. The largest annual increase in syphilis diagnoses in a decade was reported in 2014. Less condom use may be the primary reason for these increases.

        Cite This Article
    EID Mohammed H, Mitchell H, Sile B, Duffell S, Nardone A, Hughes G, et al. Increase in Sexually Transmitted Infections among Men Who Have Sex with Men, England, 2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):88-91. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151331
    AMA Mohammed H, Mitchell H, Sile B, et al. Increase in Sexually Transmitted Infections among Men Who Have Sex with Men, England, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):88-91. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151331.
    APA Mohammed, H., Mitchell, H., Sile, B., Duffell, S., Nardone, A., & Hughes, G. (2016). Increase in Sexually Transmitted Infections among Men Who Have Sex with Men, England, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 88-91. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151331.
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  • Rapid Emergence and Clonal Dissemination of CTX-M-15–Producing Salmonella enterica Serotype Virchow, South Korea PDF Version [PDF - 310 KB - 3 pages]
    J. Kim et al.
        View Abstract

    The prevalence of cefotaxime-resistant Salmonella enterica serotype Virchow has dramatically increased in South Korea since the first isolation in 2011. Of 68 isolates collected over 10 years, 28 cefotaxime-resistant isolates harbored the blaCTX-M-15 extended-spectrum β-lactamase gene and were closely related genetically, demonstrating the clonal dissemination of CTX-M-15–producing Salmonella Virchow in South Korea.

        Cite This Article
    EID Kim J, Yun Y, Kim S, Jeon S, Lee D, Chung G, et al. Rapid Emergence and Clonal Dissemination of CTX-M-15–Producing Salmonella enterica Serotype Virchow, South Korea. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):68-70. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151220
    AMA Kim J, Yun Y, Kim S, et al. Rapid Emergence and Clonal Dissemination of CTX-M-15–Producing Salmonella enterica Serotype Virchow, South Korea. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):68-70. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151220.
    APA Kim, J., Yun, Y., Kim, S., Jeon, S., Lee, D., Chung, G....Kim, J. (2016). Rapid Emergence and Clonal Dissemination of CTX-M-15–Producing Salmonella enterica Serotype Virchow, South Korea. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 68-70. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151220.
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  • Increased Risk for ESBL-Producing Bacteria from Co-administration of Loperamide and Antimicrobial Drugs for Travelers’ Diarrhea PDF Version [PDF - 465 KB - 4 pages]
    A. Kantele et al.
        View Abstract

    Antimicrobial drug treatment of travelers’ diarrhea is known to increase the risk for colonization with extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Among 288 travelers with travelers’ diarrhea, the colonization rate without medications was 21%. For treatment with loperamide only, the rate was 20%; with antimicrobial drugs alone, 40%; and with loperamide and antimicrobial drugs, 71%.

        Cite This Article
    EID Kantele A, Mero S, Kirveskari J, Lääveri T. Increased Risk for ESBL-Producing Bacteria from Co-administration of Loperamide and Antimicrobial Drugs for Travelers’ Diarrhea. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):117-120. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151272
    AMA Kantele A, Mero S, Kirveskari J, et al. Increased Risk for ESBL-Producing Bacteria from Co-administration of Loperamide and Antimicrobial Drugs for Travelers’ Diarrhea. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):117-120. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151272.
    APA Kantele, A., Mero, S., Kirveskari, J., & Lääveri, T. (2016). Increased Risk for ESBL-Producing Bacteria from Co-administration of Loperamide and Antimicrobial Drugs for Travelers’ Diarrhea. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 117-120. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151272.
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  • Autochthonous Nocardia cerradoensis Infection in Humans, Spain, 2011 and 2014 PDF Version [PDF - 346 KB - 3 pages]
    M. Ercibengoa et al.
        View Abstract

    Nocardia cerradoensis was first isolated in 2003 in the El Cerrado region of Brazil; since then, only 2 human infections, in France and Spain, have been reported. We describe 3 autochthonous cases in residents of Spain during 2011 and 2014. Together these cases support the idea of an emerging global pathogenic microorganism.

        Cite This Article
    EID Ercibengoa M, Pérez-Trallero E, Marimón J. Autochthonous Nocardia cerradoensis Infection in Humans, Spain, 2011 and 2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):109-111. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150771
    AMA Ercibengoa M, Pérez-Trallero E, Marimón J. Autochthonous Nocardia cerradoensis Infection in Humans, Spain, 2011 and 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):109-111. doi:10.3201/eid2201.150771.
    APA Ercibengoa, M., Pérez-Trallero, E., & Marimón, J. (2016). Autochthonous Nocardia cerradoensis Infection in Humans, Spain, 2011 and 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 109-111. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150771.
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  • Hemagglutinin Gene Clade 3C.2a Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses, Alachua County, Florida, USA, 2014–15 PDF Version [PDF - 316 KB - 3 pages]
    J. Lednicky et al.
        View Abstract

    Influenza A(H3N2) strains isolated during 2014–15 in Alachua County, Florida, USA, belonged to hemagglutinin gene clade 3C.2a. High rates of influenza-like illness and confirmed influenza cases in children were associated with a decrease in estimated vaccine effectiveness. Illnesses were milder than in 2013–14; severe cases were concentrated in elderly patients with underlying diseases.

        Cite This Article
    EID Lednicky J, Iovine NM, Brew J, Loeb J, Sugimoto JD, Rand KH, et al. Hemagglutinin Gene Clade 3C.2a Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses, Alachua County, Florida, USA, 2014–15. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):121-123. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151019
    AMA Lednicky J, Iovine NM, Brew J, et al. Hemagglutinin Gene Clade 3C.2a Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses, Alachua County, Florida, USA, 2014–15. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):121-123. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151019.
    APA Lednicky, J., Iovine, N. M., Brew, J., Loeb, J., Sugimoto, J. D., Rand, K. H....Morris, J. (2016). Hemagglutinin Gene Clade 3C.2a Influenza A(H3N2) Viruses, Alachua County, Florida, USA, 2014–15. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 121-123. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151019.
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  • Factors Related to Fetal Death in Pregnant Women with Cholera, Haiti, 2011–2014 PDF Version [PDF - 348 KB - 4 pages]
    E. Schillberg et al.
        View Abstract

    We assessed risk factors for fetal death during cholera infection and effect of treatment changes on these deaths. Third trimester gestation, younger maternal age, severe dehydration, and vomiting were risk factors. Changes in treatment had limited effects on fetal death, highlighting the need for prevention and evidence-based treatment.

        Cite This Article
    EID Schillberg E, Ariti C, Bryson L, Delva-Senat R, Price D, GrandPierre R, et al. Factors Related to Fetal Death in Pregnant Women with Cholera, Haiti, 2011–2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):124-127. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151078
    AMA Schillberg E, Ariti C, Bryson L, et al. Factors Related to Fetal Death in Pregnant Women with Cholera, Haiti, 2011–2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):124-127. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151078.
    APA Schillberg, E., Ariti, C., Bryson, L., Delva-Senat, R., Price, D., GrandPierre, R....Lenglet, A. (2016). Factors Related to Fetal Death in Pregnant Women with Cholera, Haiti, 2011–2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 124-127. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151078.
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  • Surveillance of Bacterial Meningitis, Ethiopia, 2012–2013 PDF Version [PDF - 514 KB - 4 pages]
    W. Mihret et al.
        View Abstract

    Among 139 patients with suspected bacterial meningitis in Ethiopia, 2012–2013, meningococci (19.4%) and pneumococci (12.9%) were the major disease-causing organisms. Meningococcal serogroups detected were A (n = 11), W (n = 7), C (n = 1), and X (n = 1). Affordable, multivalent meningitis vaccines for the African meningitis belt are urgently needed.

        Cite This Article
    EID Mihret W, Lema T, Merid Y, Kassu A, Abebe W, Moges B, et al. Surveillance of Bacterial Meningitis, Ethiopia, 2012–2013. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):75-78. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150432
    AMA Mihret W, Lema T, Merid Y, et al. Surveillance of Bacterial Meningitis, Ethiopia, 2012–2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):75-78. doi:10.3201/eid2201.150432.
    APA Mihret, W., Lema, T., Merid, Y., Kassu, A., Abebe, W., Moges, B....Norheim, G. (2016). Surveillance of Bacterial Meningitis, Ethiopia, 2012–2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 75-78. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150432.
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  • Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus and Discovery of a Recombinant Swine Enteric Coronavirus, Italy PDF Version [PDF - 610 KB - 5 pages]
    M. Boniotti et al.
        View Abstract

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) has been detected sporadically in Italy since the 1990s. We report the phylogenetic relationship of swine enteric coronaviruses collected in Italy during 2007–2014 and identify a drastic shift in PEDV strain variability and a new swine enteric coronavirus generated by recombination of transmissible gastroenteritis virus and PEDV.

        Cite This Article
    EID Boniotti M, Papetti A, Lavazza A, Alborali G, Sozzi E, Chiapponi C, et al. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus and Discovery of a Recombinant Swine Enteric Coronavirus, Italy. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):83-87. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150544
    AMA Boniotti M, Papetti A, Lavazza A, et al. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus and Discovery of a Recombinant Swine Enteric Coronavirus, Italy. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):83-87. doi:10.3201/eid2201.150544.
    APA Boniotti, M., Papetti, A., Lavazza, A., Alborali, G., Sozzi, E., Chiapponi, C....Marthaler, D. (2016). Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus and Discovery of a Recombinant Swine Enteric Coronavirus, Italy. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 83-87. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150544.
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  • Outbreak of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin–Associated Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Infection in a Rugby Team, France, 2010–2011 PDF Version [PDF - 412 KB - 4 pages]
    E. Couvé-Deacon et al.
        View Abstract

    Staphylococcus aureus strains that produce Panton-Valentine leukocidin are known to cause community infections. We describe an outbreak of skin abscesses caused by Panton-Valentine leukocidin–producing methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (clonal complex 121) in a professional rugby team in France during July 2010–February 2011. Eight team members were carriers; 7 had skin abscesses.

        Cite This Article
    EID Couvé-Deacon E, Tristan A, Pestourie N, Faure C, Doffoel-Hantz V, Garnier F, et al. Outbreak of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin–Associated Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Infection in a Rugby Team, France, 2010–2011. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):96-99. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150597
    AMA Couvé-Deacon E, Tristan A, Pestourie N, et al. Outbreak of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin–Associated Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Infection in a Rugby Team, France, 2010–2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):96-99. doi:10.3201/eid2201.150597.
    APA Couvé-Deacon, E., Tristan, A., Pestourie, N., Faure, C., Doffoel-Hantz, V., Garnier, F....Ploy, M. (2016). Outbreak of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin–Associated Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Infection in a Rugby Team, France, 2010–2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 96-99. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150597.
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  • Decline in Decreased Cephalosporin Susceptibility and Increase in Azithromycin Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Canada PDF Version [PDF - 377 KB - 3 pages]
    I. Martin et al.
        View Abstract

    Antimicrobial resistance profiles were determined for Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains isolated in Canada during 2010–2014. The proportion of isolates with decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins declined significantly between 2011 and 2014, whereas azithromycin resistance increased significantly during that period. Continued surveillance of antimicrobial drug susceptibilities is imperative to inform treatment guidelines.

        Cite This Article
    EID Martin I, Sawatzky P, Liu G, Allen V, Lefebvre B, Hoang L, et al. Decline in Decreased Cephalosporin Susceptibility and Increase in Azithromycin Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Canada. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):65-67. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151247
    AMA Martin I, Sawatzky P, Liu G, et al. Decline in Decreased Cephalosporin Susceptibility and Increase in Azithromycin Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Canada. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):65-67. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151247.
    APA Martin, I., Sawatzky, P., Liu, G., Allen, V., Lefebvre, B., Hoang, L....Mulvey, M. (2016). Decline in Decreased Cephalosporin Susceptibility and Increase in Azithromycin Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Canada. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 65-67. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151247.
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  • Legionnaires’ Disease in South Africa, 2012–2014 PDF Version [PDF - 417 KB - 3 pages]
    N. Wolter et al.
        View Abstract

    During June 2012–September 2014, we tested patients with severe respiratory illness for Legionella spp. infection and conducted a retrospective epidemiologic investigation. Of 1,805 patients tested, Legionella was detected in samples of 21 (1.2%); most were adults who had HIV or tuberculosis infections and were inappropriately treated for Legionella.

        Cite This Article
    EID Wolter N, Carrim M, Tempia S, Cohen C, Walaza S, Sahr P, et al. Legionnaires’ Disease in South Africa, 2012–2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):131-133. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150972
    AMA Wolter N, Carrim M, Tempia S, et al. Legionnaires’ Disease in South Africa, 2012–2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):131-133. doi:10.3201/eid2201.150972.
    APA Wolter, N., Carrim, M., Tempia, S., Cohen, C., Walaza, S., Sahr, P....von Gottberg, A. (2016). Legionnaires’ Disease in South Africa, 2012–2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 131-133. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150972.
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Letters

  • Louseborne Relapsing Fever in Young Migrants, Sicily, Italy, July–September 2015 PDF Version [PDF - 273 KB - 2 pages]
    A. Ciervo et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Ciervo A, Mancini F, Di Bernardo F, Giammanco A, Vitale G, Dones P, et al. Louseborne Relapsing Fever in Young Migrants, Sicily, Italy, July–September 2015. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):152-153. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151580
    AMA Ciervo A, Mancini F, Di Bernardo F, et al. Louseborne Relapsing Fever in Young Migrants, Sicily, Italy, July–September 2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):152-153. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151580.
    APA Ciervo, A., Mancini, F., Di Bernardo, F., Giammanco, A., Vitale, G., Dones, P....Rezza, G. (2016). Louseborne Relapsing Fever in Young Migrants, Sicily, Italy, July–September 2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 152-153. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151580.
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  • Ebola Virus Disease Complicated by Late-Onset Encephalitis and Polyarthritis, Sierra Leone PDF Version [PDF - 293 KB - 3 pages]
    P. Howlett et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Howlett P, Brown C, Helderman T, Brooks T, Lisk D, Deen G, et al. Ebola Virus Disease Complicated by Late-Onset Encephalitis and Polyarthritis, Sierra Leone. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):150-152. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151212
    AMA Howlett P, Brown C, Helderman T, et al. Ebola Virus Disease Complicated by Late-Onset Encephalitis and Polyarthritis, Sierra Leone. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):150-152. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151212.
    APA Howlett, P., Brown, C., Helderman, T., Brooks, T., Lisk, D., Deen, G....Lado, M. (2016). Ebola Virus Disease Complicated by Late-Onset Encephalitis and Polyarthritis, Sierra Leone. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 150-152. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151212.
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  • New Clinical Strain of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with Decreased Susceptibility to Ceftriaxone, Japan PDF Version [PDF - 353 KB - 3 pages]
    T. Deguchi et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Deguchi T, Yasuda M, Hatazaki K, Kameyama K, Horie K, Kato T, et al. New Clinical Strain of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with Decreased Susceptibility to Ceftriaxone, Japan. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):142-144. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150868
    AMA Deguchi T, Yasuda M, Hatazaki K, et al. New Clinical Strain of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with Decreased Susceptibility to Ceftriaxone, Japan. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):142-144. doi:10.3201/eid2201.150868.
    APA Deguchi, T., Yasuda, M., Hatazaki, K., Kameyama, K., Horie, K., Kato, T....Yoh, M. (2016). New Clinical Strain of Neisseria gonorrhoeae with Decreased Susceptibility to Ceftriaxone, Japan. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 142-144. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150868.
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  • Widespread Bat White-Nose Syndrome Fungus, Northeastern China PDF Version [PDF - 338 KB - 3 pages]
    J. R. Hoyt et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Hoyt JR, Sun K, Parise KL, Lu G, Langwig KE, Jiang T, et al. Widespread Bat White-Nose Syndrome Fungus, Northeastern China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):140-142. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151314
    AMA Hoyt JR, Sun K, Parise KL, et al. Widespread Bat White-Nose Syndrome Fungus, Northeastern China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):140-142. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151314.
    APA Hoyt, J. R., Sun, K., Parise, K. L., Lu, G., Langwig, K. E., Jiang, T....Feng, J. (2016). Widespread Bat White-Nose Syndrome Fungus, Northeastern China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 140-142. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151314.
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  • Measles Outbreak among Adults, Northeastern China, 2014 PDF Version [PDF - 292 KB - 3 pages]
    M. Zhang et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Zhang M, Ai J, Li Y, Zhang B, Zhang W. Measles Outbreak among Adults, Northeastern China, 2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):144-146. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151293
    AMA Zhang M, Ai J, Li Y, et al. Measles Outbreak among Adults, Northeastern China, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):144-146. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151293.
    APA Zhang, M., Ai, J., Li, Y., Zhang, B., & Zhang, W. (2016). Measles Outbreak among Adults, Northeastern China, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 144-146. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151293.
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  • Objective Determination of End of MERS Outbreak, South Korea, 2015 PDF Version [PDF - 302 KB - 3 pages]
    H. Nishiura et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Nishiura H, Miyamatsu Y, Mizumoto K. Objective Determination of End of MERS Outbreak, South Korea, 2015. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):146-148. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151383
    AMA Nishiura H, Miyamatsu Y, Mizumoto K. Objective Determination of End of MERS Outbreak, South Korea, 2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):146-148. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151383.
    APA Nishiura, H., Miyamatsu, Y., & Mizumoto, K. (2016). Objective Determination of End of MERS Outbreak, South Korea, 2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 146-148. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151383.
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  • Surveillance for Coronaviruses in Bats, Lebanon and Egypt, 2013–2015 PDF Version [PDF - 389 KB - 3 pages]
    M. M. Shehata et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Shehata MM, Chu D, Gomaa MR, AbiSaid M, El Shesheny R, Kandeil A, et al. Surveillance for Coronaviruses in Bats, Lebanon and Egypt, 2013–2015. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):148-150. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151397
    AMA Shehata MM, Chu D, Gomaa MR, et al. Surveillance for Coronaviruses in Bats, Lebanon and Egypt, 2013–2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):148-150. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151397.
    APA Shehata, M. M., Chu, D., Gomaa, M. R., AbiSaid, M., El Shesheny, R., Kandeil, A....Kayali, G. (2016). Surveillance for Coronaviruses in Bats, Lebanon and Egypt, 2013–2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 148-150. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151397.
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  • Schistosomiasis Screening of Travelers to Corsica, France PDF Version [PDF - 258 KB - 1 page]
    A. Berry et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Berry A, Paris L, Boissier J, Caumes E. Schistosomiasis Screening of Travelers to Corsica, France. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):159. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151290
    AMA Berry A, Paris L, Boissier J, et al. Schistosomiasis Screening of Travelers to Corsica, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):159. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151290.
    APA Berry, A., Paris, L., Boissier, J., & Caumes, E. (2016). Schistosomiasis Screening of Travelers to Corsica, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 159. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151290.
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  • Schistosomiasis Screening of Travelers to Corsica, France PDF Version [PDF - 265 KB - 2 pages]
    A. Beltrame et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Beltrame A, Zammarchi L, Zuglian G, Gobbi F, Angheben A, Marchese V, et al. Schistosomiasis Screening of Travelers to Corsica, France. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):159-160. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151590
    AMA Beltrame A, Zammarchi L, Zuglian G, et al. Schistosomiasis Screening of Travelers to Corsica, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):159-160. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151590.
    APA Beltrame, A., Zammarchi, L., Zuglian, G., Gobbi, F., Angheben, A., Marchese, V....Bisoffi, Z. (2016). Schistosomiasis Screening of Travelers to Corsica, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 159-160. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151590.
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  • Anticipated Negative Responses by Students to Possible Ebola Virus Outbreak, Guangzhou, China PDF Version [PDF - 319 KB - 3 pages]
    J. Lau et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Lau J, Wang Z, Kim Y, Gu J, Wu A, Zhou Q, et al. Anticipated Negative Responses by Students to Possible Ebola Virus Outbreak, Guangzhou, China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):154-156. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150898
    AMA Lau J, Wang Z, Kim Y, et al. Anticipated Negative Responses by Students to Possible Ebola Virus Outbreak, Guangzhou, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):154-156. doi:10.3201/eid2201.150898.
    APA Lau, J., Wang, Z., Kim, Y., Gu, J., Wu, A., Zhou, Q....Hao, Y. (2016). Anticipated Negative Responses by Students to Possible Ebola Virus Outbreak, Guangzhou, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 154-156. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150898.
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  • Schistosomiasis Screening of Travelers to Corsica, France PDF Version [PDF - 269 KB - 2 pages]
    P. Gautret et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Gautret P, Mockenhaupt FP, von Sonnenburg F, Rothe C, Libman M, Van De Winkel K, et al. Schistosomiasis Screening of Travelers to Corsica, France. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):160-161. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151606
    AMA Gautret P, Mockenhaupt FP, von Sonnenburg F, et al. Schistosomiasis Screening of Travelers to Corsica, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):160-161. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151606.
    APA Gautret, P., Mockenhaupt, F. P., von Sonnenburg, F., Rothe, C., Libman, M., Van De Winkel, K....Schlagenhauf, P. (2016). Schistosomiasis Screening of Travelers to Corsica, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 160-161. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151606.
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  • Azole Resistance of Aspergillus fumigatus in Immunocompromised Patients with Invasive Aspergillosis PDF Version [PDF - 266 KB - 2 pages]
    A. Alanio et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Alanio A, Denis B, Hamane S, Raffoux E, Peffault de Latour R, Menotti J, et al. Azole Resistance of Aspergillus fumigatus in Immunocompromised Patients with Invasive Aspergillosis. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):157-158. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150848
    AMA Alanio A, Denis B, Hamane S, et al. Azole Resistance of Aspergillus fumigatus in Immunocompromised Patients with Invasive Aspergillosis. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):157-158. doi:10.3201/eid2201.150848.
    APA Alanio, A., Denis, B., Hamane, S., Raffoux, E., Peffault de Latour, R., Menotti, J....Bretagne, S. (2016). Azole Resistance of Aspergillus fumigatus in Immunocompromised Patients with Invasive Aspergillosis. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 157-158. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150848.
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  • Multiple Fungicide-Driven Alterations in Azole-Resistant Aspergillus fumigatus, Colombia, 2015 PDF Version [PDF - 267 KB - 2 pages]
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    EID Le Pape P, Lavergne R, Morio F, Alvarez-Moreno C. Multiple Fungicide-Driven Alterations in Azole-Resistant Aspergillus fumigatus, Colombia, 2015. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):156-157. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150978
    AMA Le Pape P, Lavergne R, Morio F, et al. Multiple Fungicide-Driven Alterations in Azole-Resistant Aspergillus fumigatus, Colombia, 2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):156-157. doi:10.3201/eid2201.150978.
    APA Le Pape, P., Lavergne, R., Morio, F., & Alvarez-Moreno, C. (2016). Multiple Fungicide-Driven Alterations in Azole-Resistant Aspergillus fumigatus, Colombia, 2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 156-157. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.150978.
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  • Azole Resistance of Aspergillus fumigatus in Immunocompromised Patients with Invasive Aspergillosis PDF Version [PDF - 265 KB - 2 pages]
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    EID van der Linden J, Arendrup MC, Melchers W, Verweij PE. Azole Resistance of Aspergillus fumigatus in Immunocompromised Patients with Invasive Aspergillosis. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):158-159. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151308
    AMA van der Linden J, Arendrup MC, Melchers W, et al. Azole Resistance of Aspergillus fumigatus in Immunocompromised Patients with Invasive Aspergillosis. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):158-159. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151308.
    APA van der Linden, J., Arendrup, M. C., Melchers, W., & Verweij, P. E. (2016). Azole Resistance of Aspergillus fumigatus in Immunocompromised Patients with Invasive Aspergillosis. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 158-159. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151308.
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  • Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus, Midwestern United States PDF Version [PDF - 283 KB - 2 pages]
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    EID Bui CM, Gardner LM, MacIntyre C. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus, Midwestern United States. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(1):138-139. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151053
    AMA Bui CM, Gardner LM, MacIntyre C. Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus, Midwestern United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(1):138-139. doi:10.3201/eid2201.151053.
    APA Bui, C. M., Gardner, L. M., & MacIntyre, C. (2016). Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus, Midwestern United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(1), 138-139. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2201.151053.
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