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Volume 22, Number 12—December 2016
Conference Summary

Enhancement of Ebola Preparedness across Africa

Chloe E. MorozoffComments to Author , David M. Pigott, Osman Sankoh, Sandra Laney, and Simon I. Hay
Author affiliations: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, Seattle, Washington, USA (C.E. Morozoff, D.M. Pigott, S.I. Hay); Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, Oxford, UK (D.M. Pigott, S.I. Hay); INDEPTH Network, Accra, Ghana (O. Sankoh); University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa (O. Sankoh); Njala University, Njala, Sierra Leone (O. Sankoh); Vulcan, Inc., Seattle (S. Laney)

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Table 1

Description of spatial epidemiology of EVD tool layers*

Title Function Potential application Availability
Predicted distribution of Ebola virus disease across Africa
Users can view the 23 countries with areas of environmental suitability for EVD as well as previous outbreak occurrence data points (8).
Countries with predicted environmental suitability can initiate or better target surveillance, emergency operations, and preparedness measures.
http://vizhub.healthdata.org/ebola/
Predicted distribution of Ebola virus disease across Africa
Users can zoom into their country of interest and visualize subnational areas (down to a 5 x 5 km pixel level) that are most environmentally suitable.
Countries can allocate resources, raise awareness, and train health workers in areas of high risk.
     http://vizhub.healthdata.org/ebola/; choose country of interest from dropdown menu
Bat distribution layers
Users can choose between 3 RNA-positive bat species, or a combined distribution layer, to understand the environmental suitability for these potential reservoir species (5).
Animal health experts can prioritize sampling areas within their countries for EVD surveillance.
http://vizhub.healthdata.org/ebola/; choose bat distribution of interest from indicator dropdown menu or choose country of interest from country dropdown menu, if preferred
Stage 1: spillover risk
Users can explore the relative risk of Ebola virus being transmitted from an animal source to a human, at the district (admin 2) level.
Countries can implement behavior change curriculum in areas at high risk, to inform on the potential risk from wildlife interactions and explain the symptoms of Ebola.
Visualization tool in progress; contact authors for access
Stage 2: local outbreak risk
Users can explore the risk for an index case expanding to a local outbreak, at the district (admin 2) level.
Countries can allocate resources to areas of high risk, strengthening local capacity to ensure index cases are managed and contained effectively.
Visualization tool in progress; contact authors for access
Stage 3: widespread outbreak risk Users can explore the risk for a local outbreak spreading to neighboring regions, at the district (admin 2) level. Countries can ensure emergency response operations are in place for a possible outbreak, identifying where quarantine restrictions may be required, as well as where expanded surveillance activities should be undertaken. Visualization tool in progress; contact authors for access.

*EVD, Ebola virus disease.

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References
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Page created: October 26, 2016
Page updated: October 26, 2016
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