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Volume 22, Number 2—February 2016
Dispatch

Frequency and Distribution of Rickettsiae, Borreliae, and Ehrlichiae Detected in Human-Parasitizing Ticks, Texas, USA

Elizabeth A. Mitchell, Phillip Williamson, Peggy M. Billingsley, Janel P. Seals, Erin E. Ferguson, and Michael S. AllenComments to Author 
Author affiliations: University of North Texas Health Science Center, Fort Worth, Texas, USA (E.A. Mitchell, P.C. Williamson, P.M. Billingsley, J.P. Seals, E.E. Ferguson, M.S. Allen); Creative Testing Solutions, Tempe, Arizona, USA (P.C. Williamson); University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA (P.M. Billingsley)

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Figure

Maximum-likelihood tree showing that the novel Borrelia sp. identified in Amblyomma maculatum ticks from Texas in this study (box, ) and from Mississippi (12) shares a closer phylogenetic relationship to B. turcica than to to other Borreliae groups. Analysis is based on flaB sequences (267 bp). GenBank accession numbers are shown in parentheses. Tree was constructed using the Tamura 3-parameter model with a bootstrap value of 1,000 replicates. Scale bar indicates substitutions per nucleotide pos

Figure. Maximum-likelihood tree showing that the novel Borrelia sp. identified in Amblyomma maculatum ticks from Texas in this study (box) and from Mississippi (12) shares a closer phylogenetic relationship to B. turcica than to to other Borreliae groups. Analysis is based on flaB sequences (267 bp). GenBank accession numbers are shown in parentheses. Tree was constructed using the Tamura 3-parameter model with a bootstrap value of 1,000 replicates. Scale bar indicates substitutions per nucleotide position.

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References
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Page updated: January 15, 2016
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The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.
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