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Volume 22, Number 7—July 2016
Etymologia

Etymologia: Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans

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Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans [bə-trayʹ-koh-kitʺ-ri-um saʺ-la-man-dri-vo’rans]

Figure

Thumbnail of Basal infection in the skin of a fire salamander (Salamandra salamandra), characterized by extensive epidermal necrosis, presence of high numbers of intra-epithelial colonial chytrid thalli, and loss of epithelial integrity. Photo by A. Martel and F. Pasmans, courtesy Wikipedia.

Figure. Basal infection in skin of a fire salamander (Salamandra salamandra) characterized by extensive epidermal necrosis, high numbers of intra-epithelial colonial chytrid thalli, and loss of epithelial integrity. Photo by A. Martel...

Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Figure) is a recently discovered fungus that kills amphibians. It is related to B. dendrobatidis, which also kills amphibians (from the Greek dendron, “tree,” and bates, “one who climbs,” referring to a genus of poison dart frogs). Batrachochytrium is derived from the Greek words batrachos, “frog,” and chytra, “earthen pot” (describing the structure that contains unreleased zoospores); salamandrivorans is from the Greek salamandra, “salamander,” and Latin vorans, “eating,” which refers to extensive skin destruction and rapid death in infected salamanders.

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References

  1. Longcore  JE, Pessier  AP, Nichols  DK. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis gen. et sp. nov., a chytrid pathogenic to amphibians. Mycologia. 1999;91:21927. DOI
  2. Martel  A, Spitzen-van der Sluijs  A, Blooi  M, Bert  W, Ducatelle  R, Fisher  MC, Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans sp. nov. causes lethal chytridiomycosis in amphibians. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013;110:153259. DOIPubMed

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Cite This Article

DOI: 10.3201/eid2207.et2207

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Table of Contents – Volume 22, Number 7—July 2016

Page created: June 14, 2016
Page updated: June 14, 2016
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