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Volume 23, Number 4—April 2017

Research

Variation in Aedes aegypti Mosquito Competence for Zika Virus Transmission

Christopher M. Roundy1, Sasha R. Azar1, Shannan L. Rossi, Jing H. Huang, Grace Leal, Ruimei Yun, Ildefonso Fernandez-Salas, Christopher J. Vitek, Igor A.D. Paploski, Uriel Kitron, Guilherme S. Ribeiro, Kathryn A. Hanley, Scott C. WeaverComments to Author , and Nikos VasilakisComments to Author 
Author affiliations: University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Texas, USA (C.M. Roundy, S.R. Azar, S.L. Rossi, J.H. Huang, G. Leal, R. Yun, S.C. Weaver, N. Vasilakis); Centro Regional de Salud Pública, Tapachula, México (I. Fernandez-Salas); University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, Brownsville, Texas, USA (C.J. Vitek); Ministério da Saúde, Candeal, Salvador, Brazil (I.A.D. Paploski, G.S. Ribeiro); Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador (I.A.D. Paploski, G.S. Ribeiro); Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (U. Kitron); New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA (K.A. Hanley)

Main Article

Figure 1

Infection, dissemination, and transmission of 3 Zika virus strains by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes from Salvador, Brazil, after artificial blood meals with a concentration of 4 log10 (A), 5 log10 (B), or 6 log10 (C) focus-forming units/mL.

Figure 1. Infection, dissemination, and transmission of 3 Zika virus strains by Aedes aegypti mosquitoes from Salvador, Brazil, after artificial blood meals with a concentration of 4 log10 (A), 5 log10 (B), or 6 log10 (C) focus-forming units/mL.

Main Article

1These authors contributed equally to this article.

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