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Volume 23, Number 6—June 2017

Research

Outbreak-Related Disease Burden Associated with Consumption of Unpasteurized Cow’s Milk and Cheese, United States, 2009–2014

Solenne CostardComments to Author , Luis Espejo, Huybert Groenendaal, and Francisco J. Zagmutt
Author affiliations: EpiX Analytics, Boulder, Colorado, USA (S. Costard, H. Groenendaal, F.J. Zagmutt); Consultant, St. Augustine, Florida, USA (L. Espejo)

Main Article

Table 1

Dairy-related illnesses and hospitalizations from 87 outbreaks, National Outbreak Reporting System, United States, 2009–2014*

Pathogen
Outbreaks associated with milk and cheese consumption, N = 87†
Pasteurized

Unpasteurized
Outbreaks
Illnesses
Hospitalizations
Outbreaks
Illnesses
Hospitalizations
STEC 0 0 0 14‡ 99 42
Salmonella spp. 0 0 0 83 29
Listeria monocytogenes 10 100 87 1 1 1
Campylobacter spp.
1
2
0

53‡§
465
56
Overall 11 102 87 76 648 128

*Illnesses and hospitalizations had confirmed etiologies and were associated with the consumption of milk or cheese of known pasteurization status. STEC, Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli.
†Out of the 87 outbreaks, 10 outbreaks reported a total of 17 deaths, 16 of them were linked to L. monocytogenes and 1 to Campylobacter spp.
‡One outbreak (38 illnesses and 10 hospitalizations) had 3 cases with confirmed coinfection (STEC and Campylobacter spp.). These 3 cases were duplicated because they were assigned to each pathogen.
§One outbreak (4 illnesses and 1 hospitalization) involved 2 pathogens: 3 Illnesses and 1 hospitalization were linked to Campylobacter spp. and 1 illness and 0 hospitalizations were linked to Salmonella spp.

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