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Volume 23, Number 9—September 2017

Research Letter

Antimicrobial Drug–Resistant Shiga Toxin–Producing Escherichia coli Infections, Michigan, USA

Sanjana Mukherjee, Rebekah E. Mosci, Chase M. Anderson, Brian A. Snyder, James Collins, James T. Rudrik, and Shannon D. ManningComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA (S. Mukherjee, R.E. Mosci, C.M. Anderson, B.A. Snyder, S.D. Manning); Michigan Department of Health and Human Services, Lansing (J. Collins, J.T. Rudrik)

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Table

Antimicrobial drug resistance in 353 clinical Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli isolates, by serotype, Michigan, USA, 2010–2014*

Serotype No. isolates No. (%) isolates
Any resistance Ampicillin resistance Ciprofloxacin resistance SXT resistance
O157
146
8 (5.5)
7 (4.8)
0 (0)
5 (3.4)
Non-O157
207
23 (11.1)
19 (9.2)
1 (0.5)
9 (4.3)
O26
53
4 (7.6)
4 (7.6)
0 (0)
1 (1.9)
O45
50
6 (12.0)
5 (10.0)
0 (0)
2 (4.0)
O103
75
6 (8.0)
5 (6.7)
1 (1.3)
4 (5.3)
O111 29 7 (24.1) 5 (17.2) 0 (0) 2 (6.9)

*We tested 358 isolates by disk diffusion for resistance to ampicillin (10 μg in disk), SXT (25 μg in disk), and ciprofloxacin (5 μg in disk). MICs were determined by using Etest. Strains were classified as resistant or susceptible according to Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines; E. coli ATCC 25922 was used as a control. Five isolates had unknown serotypes and were excluded from analysis. Isolate numbers for individual antibiotics do not always add up to the total number of isolates with any resistance because some isolates were resistant to >1 drug. SXT, trimethoprim/
sulfamethoxazole.

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