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Volume 24, Number 6—June 2018
Etymologia

Etymologia: Angiostrongylus

Ronnie HenryComments to Author 

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Angiostrongylus [anʺje-o-stronʹjĭ-ləs]

Figure

Thumbnail of Adult Angiostrongylus cantonensis recovered from rat lungs. Image from Enzootic Angiostrongylus cantonensis in Rats and Snails after an Outbreak of Human Eosinophilic Meningitis, Jamaica, John F. Lindo et al, Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 8, No. 3, March 2002.

Figure. Adult Angiostrongylus cantonensis nematode recovered from rat lung. Image from Enzootic Angiostrongylus cantonensis in Rats and Snails after an Outbreak of Human Eosinophilic Meningitis, Jamaica, John F. Lindo et al, Emerging...

From the Greek angeion (“vessel”) + strongylos (“round”), Angiostrongylus (Figure) is a genus of parasitic nematodes (roundworms) in the family Angiostrongylidae, 2 species of which are known to parasitize humans. A. cantonensis (commonly known as rat lungworm) was first described in 1935 (as Pulmonema cantonensis) from rats in Canton, China. It is the most common cause of eosinophilic meningitis in Asia and the Pacific Basin, but cases have been reported in many parts of the world. A. costaricensis roundworms were first described in 1971 in Costa Rica from surgical specimens from children with eosinophilic infiltration in the abdominal cavity. The distribution of this species ranges from the southern United States to northern Argentina.

There is still debate about what taxonomic name should be used. A. cantonensis remains in general use, but some researchers suggest it should be changed to Parastrongylus cantonensis on the basis of the morphology of the adult male bursa and the definitive host being rats.

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References

  1. Chen  HT. A new pulmonary nematode, Pulmonema cantonensis, n.g., n.sp. in Canton rats [in French]. Ann Parasitol. 1935;13:3127. DOI
  2. Cowie  RH. Biology, systematics, life cycle, and distribution of Angiostrongylus cantonensis, the cause of rat lungworm disease. Hawaii J Med Public Health. 2013;72(Suppl 2):69.PubMed
  3. Morera  P, Céspedes  R. Angiostrongylus costaricensis n. sp. (Nematoda: Metastrongyloidea), a new lungworm occurring in man in Costa Rica. Rev Biol Trop. 1970;18:17385.PubMed
  4. Simner  PJ. Medical parasitology taxonomy update: January 2012 to December 2015. J Clin Microbiol. 2016;55:437. DOIPubMed
  5. Ubelaker  JE. Systematics of species referred to the genus Angiostrongylus. J Parasitol. 1986;72:23744. DOIPubMed

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Cite This Article

DOI: 10.3201/eid2406.et2406

Original Publication Date: May 07, 2018

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Table of Contents – Volume 24, Number 6—June 2018

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Ronnie Henry, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Mailstop E03, Atlanta, GA 30329-4027, USA

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Page created: May 17, 2018
Page updated: May 17, 2018
Page reviewed: May 17, 2018
The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.
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