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Volume 24, Number 9—September 2018
Dispatch

Increasing Prevalence of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto–Infected Blacklegged Ticks in Tennessee Valley, Tennessee, USA

Graham J. HicklingComments to Author , Janetta R. Kelly, Lisa D. Auckland, and Sarah A. Hamer
Author affiliations: University of Tennessee Institute of Agriculture, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA (G.J. Hickling, J.R. Kelly); Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA (L.D. Auckland, S.A. Hamer)

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Figure 1

County-level distribution of Ixodes scapularis ticks and Borrelia burgdorferi–infected I. scapularis ticks in upper Tennessee Valley, USA, 2006 and 2017. A county was classified as having an established I. scapularis population if >6 I. scapularis adult ticks or ticks of 2 life stages were collected in that county. A county was classified as having I. scapularis ticks reported if 1–5 I. scapularis ticks of a single life stage were collected in that county. A county was classified as infected

Figure 1. County-level distribution of Ixodes scapularis ticks and Borrelia burgdorferi–infected I. scapularis ticks in upper Tennessee Valley, USA, 2006 and 2017. A county was classified as having an established I. scapularis population if >6 I. scapularis adult ticks or ticks of 2 life stages were collected in that county. A county was classified as having I. scapularis ticks reported if 1–5 I. scapularis ticks of a single life stage were collected in that county. A county was classified as infected if I. scapularis ticks infected with B. burgdorferi were detected in that county. A) I. scapularis ticks in 2006 (2), determined by collecting ticks from hunter-harvested deer. B) I. scapularis ticks in 2017 determined by drag-cloth surveying during the peak of adult tick activity (late October–January).

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Page created: August 15, 2018
Page updated: August 15, 2018
Page reviewed: August 15, 2018
The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.
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