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Volume 25, Number 12—December 2019
Dispatch

West Nile Virus in Wildlife and Nonequine Domestic Animals, South Africa, 2010–2018

Jumari Steyn, Elizabeth Botha, Voula I. Stivaktas, Peter Buss, Brianna R. Beechler, Jan G. Myburgh, Johan Steyl, June Williams, and Marietjie VenterComments to Author 
Author affiliations: University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa (J. Steyn, E. Botha, V.I. Stivaktas, J.G. Myburgh, J. Steyl, J. Williams, M. Venter); South African National Parks, Kruger National Park, South Africa (P. Buss); Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, USA (B.R. Beechler)

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Figure 2

Maximum-likelihood phylogram of the partial (215-nt) nonstructural protein gene used for identification of West Nile virus infection in wildlife and nonequine domestic animals, South Africa, 2010–2018. Tree was generated with RAXML (https://cme.h-its.org/exelixis/web/software/raxml) using the general time-reversible plus gamma model with 39 taxa and the AutoMRE bootstopping function invoked (bootstraps >65 as branch support). Black circles indicate wildlife and nonequine domestic animal seque

Figure 2. Maximum-likelihood phylogram of the partial (215-nt) nonstructural protein gene used for identification of West Nile virus infection in wildlife and nonequine domestic animals, South Africa, 2010–2018. Tree was generated with RAXML (https://cme.h-its.org/exelixis/web/software/raxml) using the general time-reversible plus gamma model with 39 taxa and the AutoMRE bootstopping function invoked (bootstraps >65 as branch support). Black circles indicate wildlife and nonequine domestic animal sequences from this study; open circles indicate horse sequences (3,12). Reference strains, GenBank accession numbers, and origins are as indicated in (4). GenBank accession numbers for the newly sequenced strains are ZRU87_18, MN270988; ZRU159_18_SA, MN270989; ZRU161_18_SA, MN27099; and ZRU181_12_1, KY176733. The sequences for strains ZRU358/17, ZRU061/16/2, and ZRU297/17 were <200 bp long and therefore could not be submitted to GenBank; the sequence data are available from the authors. Scale bar indicates nucleotide substitutions per site.

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Page updated: November 18, 2019
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