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Volume 25, Number 2—February 2019

Research

Echinococcus multilocularis Infection, Southern Ontario, Canada

Jonathon D. KotwaComments to Author , Mats Isaksson, Claire M. Jardine, G. Douglas Campbell, Olaf Berke, David L. Pearl, Nicola J. Mercer, Eva Osterman-Lind, and Andrew S. Peregrine
Author affiliations: University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada (J.D. Kotwa, C.M. Jardine, G.D. Campbell, O. Berke, D.L. Pearl, A.S. Peregrine); National Veterinary Institute, Uppsala, Sweden (M. Isaksson, E. Osterman-Lind); Canadian Wildlife Health Cooperative, Guelph (C.M. Jardine, G.D. Campbell); Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph Public Health, Guelph (N.J. Mercer)

Main Article

Figure 2

Choropleth maps of A) the unadjusted prevalence and B) the empirical Bayesian-smoothed prevalence of Echinococcus multilocularis tapeworms in coyotes and foxes across 25 southern Ontario public health units, 2015–2017. Unadjusted and smoothed prevalence estimates are categorized by quartiles on the basis of unadjusted prevalence estimates. Red boundaries indicate a significant spatial cluster of high prevalence identified by using a spatial scan test with a Bernoulli model on the basis of data g

Figure 2. Choropleth maps of A) the unadjusted prevalence and B) the empirical Bayesian-smoothed prevalence of Echinococcus multilocularis tapeworms in coyotes and foxes across 25 southern Ontario public health units, 2015–2017. Unadjusted and smoothed prevalence estimates are categorized by quartiles on the basis of unadjusted prevalence estimates. Red boundaries indicate a significant spatial cluster of high prevalence identified by using a spatial scan test with a Bernoulli model on the basis of data georeferenced to their public health units (relative risk 2.26; p = 0.002).

Main Article

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