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Volume 25, Number 8—August 2019
Dispatch

Marburgvirus in Egyptian Fruit Bats, Zambia

Masahiro Kajihara, Bernard M. Hang’ombe, Katendi Changula, Hayato Harima, Mao Isono, Kosuke Okuya, Reiko Yoshida, Akina Mori-Kajihara, Yoshiki Eto, Yasuko Orba, Hirohito Ogawa, Yongjin Qiu, Hirofumi Sawa, Edgar Simulundu, Daniel Mwizabi, Musso Munyeme, David Squarre, Victor Mukonka, Aaron Mweene, and Ayato TakadaComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan (M. Kajihara, H. Harima, M. Isono, K. Okuya, R. Yoshida, A. Mori-Kajihara, Y. Eto, Y. Orba, Y. Qiu, H. Sawa, A. Takada); University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia (B.M. Hang’ombe, K. Changula, H. Sawa, E. Simulundu, M. Munyeme, A. Mweene, A. Takada); Okayama University, Okayama, Japan (H. Ogawa); Department of National Parks and Wildlife, Lusaka (D. Mwizabi, D. Squarre); Zambia National Public Health Institute, Lusaka (V. Mukonka)

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Figure

Phylogenetic trees showing evolutionary relationships of Marburgviruses from Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus), Zambia, 2018 (boldface), and reference viruses. The trees were constructed based on nucleotide sequences of 440 nt for the nucleoprotein gene (A), 296 nt for the viral protein 35 gene (B), and 238 nt for the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene (C) by using the maximum-likelihood method in MEGA7 (11). Nucleotide sequences of representative Marburgvirus strains were obtained from

Figure. Phylogenetic trees showing evolutionary relationships of Marburgviruses from Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus), Zambia, 2018 (boldface), and reference viruses. The trees were constructed based on nucleotide sequences of 440 nt for the nucleoprotein gene (A), 296 nt for the viral protein 35 gene (B), and 238 nt for the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene (C) by using the maximum-likelihood method in MEGA7 (11). Nucleotide sequences of representative Marburgvirus strains were obtained from GenBank; accession numbers are shown with strain names. Bootstrap values >80 are shown near the branch nodes. Scale bars indicate nucleotide substitutions per site.

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Page updated: July 17, 2019
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