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Volume 26, Number 11—November 2020
Synopsis

Challenges to Achieving Measles Elimination, Georgia, 2013–2018

Nino KhetsurianiComments to Author , Ketevan Sanadze, Rusudan Chlikadze, Nazibrola Chitadze, Tamar Dolakidze, Tamta Komakhidze, Lia Jabidze, Shahin Huseynov, Myriam Ben Mamou, Claude Muller, Khatuna Zakhashvili, and Judith M. Hübschen
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (N. Khetsuriani); CDC South Caucasus Office, Tbilisi, Georgia (N. Khetsuriani); National Center for Disease Control and Public Health, Tbilisi (K. Sanadze, R. Chlikadze, N. Chitadze, T. Dolakidze, T. Komakhidze, L. Jabidze, K. Zakhashvili); South Caucasus Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Program, Tbilisi (T. Komakhidze); World Health Organization European Regional Office, Copenhagen, Denmark (S. Huseynov, M. Ben Mamou); World Health Organization European Regional Reference Laboratory for Measles and Rubella, Luxembourg Institute of Health, Esch-sur-Alzette, Luxembourg (C. Muller, J.M. Hübschen)

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Figure 8

Genetic diversity of measles virus strains identified in Georgia, 2013–2018. Genotype D8 cluster of a phylogenetic tree is based on 450 nt of the measles virus nucleoprotein gene. The Kimura 2-parameter model and the neighbor-joining method in MEGA7 (14) were used, and only bootstrap values >70 are shown. The closest matches of the Georgia sequence variants identified by BLAST (https://blast.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Blast.cgi) are marked with a diamond; named strains of genotype D8 are marked with a square. For identical sequences, only the oldest and the most recent strains found in a certain location in a certain year are shown. The total number of sequences identified in each cluster are included in parentheses. Year of virus detection is indicated by colored circles: black for 2013, red for 2014, green for 2015, yellow for 2016, blue for 2017, pink for 2018. Scale bar indicates genetic distance, calculated based on the Kimura 2-parameter model, measured in nucleotide substitutions per site.

Figure 8. Genetic diversity of measles virus strains identified in Georgia, 2013–2018. Genotype D8 cluster of a phylogenetic tree is based on 450 nt of the measles virus nucleoprotein gene. The Kimura 2-parameter model and the neighbor-joining method in MEGA7 (14) were used, and only bootstrap values >70 are shown. The closest matches of the Georgia sequence variants identified by BLAST (https://blast.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Blast.cgi) are marked with a diamond; named strains of genotype D8 are marked with a square. For identical sequences, only the oldest and the most recent strains found in a certain location in a certain year are shown. The total number of sequences identified in each cluster are included in parentheses. Year of virus detection is indicated by colored circles: black for 2013, red for 2014, green for 2015, yellow for 2016, blue for 2017, pink for 2018. Scale bar indicates genetic distance, calculated based on the Kimura 2-parameter model, measured in nucleotide substitutions per site.

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Page created: September 14, 2020
Page updated: October 17, 2020 10:15 PM EDT
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