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Volume 28, Supplement—December 2022
SUPPLEMENT ISSUE
Synopsis

Lessons Learned from CDC’s Global COVID-19 Early Warning and Response Surveillance System

Philip M. RicksComments to Author , Gibril J. Njie, Fatimah S. Dawood, Amy E. Blain, Alison Winstead, Adebola Popoola, Cynthia Jones, Chaoyang Li, James Fuller, Puneet Anantharam, Natalie Olson, Allison Taylor Walker, Matthew Biggerstaff, Barbara J. Marston, Ray R. Arthur, Sarah D. Bennett, and Ronald L. Moolenaar
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (P.M. Ricks, G.J. Njie, F.S. Dawood, A.E. Blain, A. Winstead, A. Popoola, C. Li, J. Fuller, P. Anantharam, N. Olson, A. Taylor Walker, M. Biggerstaff, B.J. Marston, R.R. Arthur, S.D. Bennett, R.L. Moolenaar); Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Atlanta (C. Jones)

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Figure 1

Overview of public health surveillance and response functions used in an evaluation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Early Warning and Response Surveillance system. Adapted from the World Health Organization (4). *Conventional human surveillance based on biological confirmation of cases.†Hman cases data based on syndromic definition. ‡Data and information in relation to human health (e.g., media reports, sick leave, medicine sales, population movement, social unrest, etc.). §Veterinary surveillance (zoonosis), environmental or biological surveillance (e.g., meteorlogical, vector density, water and air quality, etc.).

Figure 1. Overview of public health surveillance and response functions used in an evaluation of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Early Warning and Response Surveillance system. Adapted from the World Health Organization (4). *Conventional human surveillance based on biological confirmation of cases.†Hman cases data based on syndromic definition. ‡Data and information in relation to human health (e.g., media reports, sick leave, medicine sales, population movement, social unrest, etc.). §Veterinary surveillance (zoonosis), environmental or biological surveillance (e.g., meteorlogical, vector density, water and air quality, etc.).

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