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Volume 17, Number 5—May 2011
Etymologia

Etymologia: Francisella tularensis

Nancy MännikköComments to Author 
Author affiliation: Author affiliation: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA

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[fran-sĭ-sel′ə too′′lə-ren-sis]

While studying plague in ground squirrels in 1911, George McCoy and Charles Chapin discovered a bacterium that caused a different disease. They named the pathogen Bacterium tularense after Tulare County, California, location of their study. In 1928, Edward Francis, a US Public Health Service bacteriologist, linked B. tularense with deer fly fever―tularemia transmitted by deer flies from infected wild rabbits to humans. In 1974, B. tularense was renamed Francisella tularensis in recognition of Dr. Francis’ many contributions to our knowledge of tularemia.

Sources: Barry, J. Notable contributions to medical research by public health scientists. Public Health Service Publication No. 752. 1960 [cited 2011 Feb 25]. http://history.nih.gov/research/downloads/Notable_Cont_Med_Research.pdf; Francis E. Sources of infection and seasonal incidence of tularemia in man. Public Health Rep. 1937;52:103–13; McCoy GW, Chapin CW. Further observations on a plague-like disease of rodents with a preliminary note on the causative agent, Bacterium tularensis. J Infect Dis. 1912;10:61–72; Sjöstedt A. Tularemia: history, epidemiology, pathogen physiology, and clinical manifestations. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2007;1105:1–29. PubMed doi:10.1196/annals.1409.009

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Cite This Article

DOI: 10.3201/eid1705.et1705

Sources: Barry, J. Notable contributions to medical research by public health scientists. Public Health Service Publication No. 752. 1960 [cited 2011 Feb 25]. http://history.nih.gov/research/downloads/Notable_Cont_Med_Research.pdf; Francis E. Sources of infection and seasonal incidence of tularemia in man. Public Health Rep. 1937;52:103–13; McCoy GW, Chapin CW. Further observations on a plague-like disease of rodents with a preliminary note on the causative agent, Bacterium tularensis. J Infect Dis. 1912;10:61–72; Sjöstedt A. Tularemia: history, epidemiology, pathogen physiology, and clinical manifestations. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2007;1105:1–29. PubMed doi:10.1196/annals.1409.009

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Table of Contents – Volume 17, Number 5—May 2011

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Nancy Männikkö, EID Journal, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Rd NE, Mailstop D61, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA

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Page created: September 09, 2011
Page updated: September 09, 2011
Page reviewed: September 09, 2011
The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.
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