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Volume 17, Number 9—September 2011
Dispatch

Wild Rodents and Novel Human Pathogen Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis, Southern Sweden

Martin AnderssonComments to Author  and Lars Råberg
Author affiliations: Author affiliation: Lund University, Lund, Sweden

Main Article

Figure 2

Phylogenetic network of 16s rRNA sequences (1,231 bp) from Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis, southern Sweden, 2008. Black nodes indicate intermediate inferred sequences on the most parsimonious route between observed sequences. Numbers on branches represents mutations, numbered according to nucleotide position in the alignment. The sequence obtained in this study is shown in boldface and is identical with sequences from human patients in Germany (3) and Switzerland (2). The Japanese reference

Figure 2. Phylogenetic network of 16s rRNA sequences (1,231 bp) from Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis, southern Sweden, 2008. Black nodes indicate intermediate inferred sequences on the most parsimonious route between observed sequences. Numbers on branches represents mutations, numbered according to nucleotide position in the alignment. The sequence obtained in this study is shown in boldface and is identical with sequences from human patients in Germany (3) and Switzerland (2). The Japanese reference strain TK4456 (7) showed 99.2% similarity with our sequence, and the North American Candidatus N. lotori strain (12) showed 98.3% similarity.

Main Article

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Page created: September 06, 2011
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