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Volume 20, Number 10—October 2014
Letter

Marburgvirus Resurgence in Kitaka Mine Bat Population after Extermination Attempts, Uganda

Brian Amman, Luke Nyakarahuka, Anita K. McElroy, Kimberly A. Dodd, Tara Sealy, Amy J. Schuh, Trevor R. Shoemaker, Stephen Balinandi, Patrick Atimnedi, Winyi Kaboyo, Stuart T. Nichol, and Jonathan S. TownerComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (B.R. Amman, A.K. McElroy, K.A. Dodd, T.K. Sealy, A.J. Schuh, S.T. Nichol, J.S. Towner); Uganda Virus Research Institute, Entebbe, Uganda (L. Nyakarahuka); Emory University, Atlanta (A.K. McElroy); University of California, Davis, California, USA (K.A. Dodd); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Entebbe (T.R. Shoemaker, S. Balinandi); Uganda Wildlife Authority, Kampala, Uganda (P. Atimnedi); Uganda Ministry of Health, Kampala (W. Kaboyo)

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Figure

Phylogeny of concatenated marburgvirus nucleoprotein (NP) and viral protein 35 (VP35) gene fragments as determined by using the maximum-likelihood method. Sequences from the NP (289–372 nt) and VP35 (203–213 nt) genes were amplified and determined from viral RNA and then sequenced as described elsewhere (4). Sequence names shown in red font represent those generated from samples collected from bats during the November 2012 outbreak investigation at Kitaka Mine, Uganda. Sequence names in blue fon

Figure. Phylogeny of concatenated marburgvirus nucleoprotein (NP) and viral protein 35 (VP35) gene fragments as determined by using the maximum-likelihood method. Sequences from the NP (289–372 nt) and VP35 (203–213 nt) genes were amplified and determined from viral RNA and then sequenced as described elsewhere (4). Sequence names shown in red font represent those generated from samples collected from bats during the November 2012 outbreak investigation at Kitaka Mine, Uganda. Sequence names in blue font represent those generated from samples obtained from marburgvirus-infected persons in Kabale and Ibanda, Uganda, in 2012. Multiple sequence alignments were generated, and a maximum-likelihood analysis was conducted on concatenated NP and VP35 (208–580 nt) sequences by using the PhyML method in conjunction with the GTR+I+G nucleotide substitution model implemented in SeaView version 4.2.12 (10). NP and VP35 gene sequences determined from samples in this study (in red) were submitted to GenBank (accession nos. KJ747211–KJ747234 and KJ747235–KJ747253, respectively). Bayesian posterior probabilities above 50 are shown at the nodes. Scale bar indicates nucleotide substitutions per site. Ang, Angola; DRC, Democratic Republic of Congo; Gab, Gabon; Ger, Germany; Ken, Kenya; Net, Netherlands; Rav, Ravn virus; Uga, Uganda; Zim, Zimbabwe.

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