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Volume 22, Number 1—January 2016
Letter

Widespread Bat White-Nose Syndrome Fungus, Northeastern China

Joseph R. HoytComments to Author , Keping Sun, Katy L. Parise, Guanjun Lu, Kate E. Langwig, Tinglei Jiang, Shubao Yang, Winifred F. Frick, A. Marm Kilpatrick, Jeffrey T. Foster1, and Jiang FengComments to Author 
Author affiliations: University of California, Santa Cruz, California, USA (J.R. Hoyt, K.E. Langwig, W.F. Frick, A.M. Kilpatrick); Northeast Normal University, Changchun, China (K. Sun, G. Lu, T. Jiang, J. Feng); Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona, USA (K.L. Parise, J.T. Foster); Changchun Normal University, Changchun (G. Lu); Jilin Agricultural University, Changchun (S. Yang)

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Figure

A) Distribution of Pseudogymnoascus destructans in cave environments during summer at 9 sites in northeastern China. Pie charts show the prevalence (red indicates fraction of positive samples) of P. destructans, and the size of pie graphs indicates the number of samples taken at each site (range 10–35). B) Histologic wing cross-section from Myotis petax bat collected in March 2015 with cup-like lesion (arrow) diagnostic of white-nose syndrome (periodic acid–Schiff staining). C) M. petax bat in a

Figure. A) Distribution of Pseudogymnoascus destructans in cave environments during summer at 9 sites in northeastern China. Pie charts show the prevalence (red indicates fraction of positive samples) of P. destructans, and the size of pie graphs indicates the number of samples taken at each site (range 10–35). B) Histologic wing cross-section from Myotis petax bat collected in March 2015 with cup-like lesion (arrow) diagnostic of white-nose syndrome (periodic acid–Schiff staining). C) M. petax bat in a cave in Jilin, China, showing visible signs of white-nose syndrome, March 2015. D) Documented global distribution of P. destructans. Areas in solid dark red and blue represent the provinces and countries in China and Europe, respectively, where P. destructans was detected in this study and from previous research (5). Semitransparent red and blue regions show the species ranges (range data taken from http://www.iucnredlist.org/) for the bat species detected with P. destructans in Asia (n = 6) and Europe (n = 13) (8) and possible distribution of P. destructans. The solid orange region in North America shows the extent of P. destructans spread as of May 15, 2015 (https://www.whitenosesyndrome.org/resources/map).

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1Current affiliation: University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire, USA.

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