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Volume 22, Number 2—February 2016

Dispatch

African Buffalo Movement and Zoonotic Disease Risk across Transfrontier Conservation Areas, Southern Africa

Alexandre CaronComments to Author , Daniel Cornelis, Chris Foggin, Markus Hofmeyr, and Michel de Garine-Wichatitsky
Author affiliations: University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South Africa (A. Caron); CIRAD, Montpellier, France (A. Caron, D. Cornelis, M. de Garine-Wichatitsky); CIRAD, Harare, Zimbabwe (A. Caron, D. Cornelis, M. de Garine-Wichatitsky); Victoria Falls Wildlife Trust, Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe (C. Foggin); South African National Parks, Skukuza, South Africa (M. Hofmeyr); University of Zimbabwe, Harare (M. de Garine-Wichatitsky)

Main Article

Figure 2

Cumulative home-range area of 15 buffalo collared with global positioning system devices in Kruger National Park, South Africa, in November 2013. Only buffalo with collars that functioned for an entire year are displayed. Data for 2 subadult female buffalo (paths displayed in Figure 1) are shown (ID65 and ID68) separately from data for the 13 other buffalo (subadult and adult females). Gray shading indicates the rainy season (generally when movement began).

Figure 2. Cumulative home-range area of 15 buffalo collared with global positioning system devices in Kruger National Park, South Africa, in November 2013. Only buffalo with collars that functioned for an entire year are displayed. Data for 2 subadult female buffalo (paths displayed in Figure 1) are shown (ID65 and ID68) separately from data for the 13 other buffalo (subadult and adult females). Gray shading indicates the rainy season (generally when movement began).

Main Article

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