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Volume 23, Number 5—May 2017
Dispatch

Survey of Treponemal Infections in Free-Ranging and Captive Macaques, 1999–2012

Amy R. Klegarth, Chigozie A. Ezeonwu, Aida Rompis, Benjamin P.Y.-H. Lee, Nantiya Aggimarangsee, Mukesh Chalise, John Cortes, M. Feeroz, Barbara J. Molini, Bess C. Godornes, Michael Marks, Michael Schillaci, Gregory Engel, Sascha Knauf, Sheila A. Lukehart, and Lisa Jones-EngelComments to Author 
Author affiliations: University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA (A.R. Klegarth, C.A. Ezeonwu, B.J. Molini, B.C. Godornes, S.A. Lukehart, L. Jones-Engel); Udayana University, Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia (A. Rompis); University of Kent, Canterbury, UK (B.P.Y-H. Lee); Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand (N. Aggimarangsee); Tribhuvan University, Kirtipu, Nepal (M. Chalise); HM Government of Gibraltar, Gibraltar, Gibraltar (J. Cortes); Jahangirnagar University, Dhaka, Bangladesh (M. Feeroz); London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK (M. Marks); University of Toronto Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario, Canada (M. Schillaci); Samuel Simmonds Memorial Hospital, Barrow, Alaska, USA (G. Engel); German Primate Center, Gottingen, Germany (S. Knauf)

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Figure

Individual sampling sites where macaques were tested for infection with Treponema spp. during 1999–2012 and the number of human yaws cases during 2001–2011, Sulawesi, Indonesia. Numbers in parentheses indicate number nonhuman primates sampled in each of the 6 provinces. ESPLINE TP (Fujirebio Inc., Tokyo, Japan) reagent for the detection of T. pallidum antibodies was used to determine whether macaque samples were positive for treponemal infection. The number of human yaws cases was determined by

Figure. Individual sampling sites where macaques were tested for infection with Treponema spp. during 1999–2012 and the number of human yaws cases during 2001–2011, Sulawesi, Indonesia. Numbers in parentheses indicate number nonhuman primates sampled in each of the 6 provinces. ESPLINE TP (Fujirebio Inc., Tokyo, Japan) reagent for the detection of T. pallidum antibodies was used to determine whether macaque samples were positive for treponemal infection. The number of human yaws cases was determined by the World Health Organization (1). Inset map shows the location of Sulawesi in Indonesia (gray shading). NA, not available.

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References
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