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Volume 26, Number 3—March 2020
Research

Long-Term Rodent Surveillance after Outbreak of Hantavirus Infection, Yosemite National Park, California, USA, 2012

Mary E. DanforthComments to Author , Sharon Messenger, Danielle Buttke, Matthew Weinburke, George Carroll, Gregory Hacker, Michael Niemela, Elizabeth S. Andrews, Bryan T. Jackson, Vicki Kramer, and Mark Novak
Author affiliations: California Department of Public Health, Sacramento, California, USA (M.E. Danforth, G. Hacker, M. Niemela, E.S. Andrews, B.T. Jackson, V. Kramer, M. Novak); California Department of Public Health, Richmond, California, USA (S. Messenger); National Park Service, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA (D. Buttke); National Park Service, El Portal, California USA (M. Weinburke, G. Carroll)

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Figure 3

Proportion of Peromyscus rodent captures that were P. maniculatus from areas of Yosemite Valley, Yosemite National Park, California, USA, 2012–2018. Figure includes data from the August and September 2012 outbreak investigation (8) for reference. SNV, Sin Nombre virus.

Figure 3. Proportion of Peromyscus rodent captures that were P. maniculatus from areas of Yosemite Valley, Yosemite National Park, California, USA, 2012–2018. Figure includes data from the August– September 2012 outbreak investigation (8) for reference. SNV, Sin Nombre virus.

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Page updated: February 20, 2020
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