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Volume 20, Number 12—December 2014
Dispatch

Molecular Epidemiology of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus among Humans and Swine, Sri Lanka

Harsha K.K. Perera, Dhanasekaran Vijaykrishna, Akuratiya G. Premarathna, Chrishan J.S. Jayamaha, Geethani Wickramasinghe, Chung L. Cheung, Ming F. Yeung, Leo L.M. Poon, Aluthgama K.C. Perera, Ian Barr, Yi Guan, and Ahmad M. HakawiComments to Author 
Author affiliations: University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China (H.K.K. Perera, C.L. Cheung, M.F. Yeung. L.L.M. Poon, Y. Guan, M. Peiris); University of Kelaniya, Kelaniya, Sri Lanka (H.K.K. Perera, A.G. Premarathna); Duke-National University of Singapore Graduate Medical School, Singapore (D. Vijaykrishna); Medical Research Institute, Colombo, Sri Lanka (C.J.S. Jayamaha, G. Wickramasinghe); Colombo Municipal Council, Colombo (A.K.-C. Perera); WHO Collaborating Centre for Reference and Research on Influenza, Melbourne, Australia (I.G.Barr)

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Figure 2

Phylogeny and divergence times of the concatenated whole genome of 2 swine pandemic influenza A(H1N1) (H1N1pdm) virus clusters (sw 1 and 2) detected in Sri Lanka (a,b) and distribution of swine farms yielding H1N1pdm virus isolates during 2009-2013. Gray branches represent global H1N1pdm viruses and black branches represent human and swine H1N1pdm viruses isolated in this study (a, b). Farm of origin is provided from all swine isolates. Gray bars on the tree nodes represent 95% highest posterior

Figure 2. Phylogeny and divergence times of the concatenated whole genome of 2 swine pandemic influenza A(H1N1) (H1N1pdm) virus clusters (sw 1 and 2) detected in Sri Lanka (A,B) and distribution of swine farms yielding H1N1pdm virus isolates during 2009�?"2013. Gray branches represent global H1N1pdm viruses and black branches represent human and swine H1N1pdm viruses isolated in this study (A, B). Farm of origin is provided for all swine isolates. Gray bars on the tree nodes represent 95% highest posterior density intervals of divergence times. The maximum clade credible tree is summarized from 2 runs of 20 million generations (after the removal of the first 10% as burnin), using the uncorrelated lognormal relaxed clock model, the SRD06 codon based nucleotide substitution model and an exponential coalescent population size, in BEAST (7). The number of swine H1N1pdm viruses isolated in the farm is provided in brackets (C). The farms from which H1N1pdm viruses were isolated in 2011 are farms A, C, and G. The common transportation truck is the property of the farm M owner. Approximate locations are given.

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Page updated: November 19, 2014
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