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Volume 22, Number 12—December 2016
Dispatch

Baylisascaris procyonis Roundworm Seroprevalence among Wildlife Rehabilitators, United States and Canada, 2012–2015

Sarah G.H. SappComments to Author , Lisa N. Rascoe, Patricia P. Wilkins, Sukwan Handali, Elizabeth B. Gray, Mark L. Eberhard, Dana M. Woodhall, Susan P. Montgomery, Karen L. Bailey, Emily W. Lankau1, and Michael J. Yabsley
Author affiliations: University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, USA (S.G.H. Sapp, K.L. Bailey, E.W. Lankau, M.J. Yabsley); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (L.N. Rascoe, P.P. Wilkins, S. Handali, E.B. Gray, M. Eberhard, D.M. Woodhall, S.P. Montgomery); Kentucky Wildlife Center, Lexington, Kentucky, USA (K.L. Bailey)

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Figure

Locations for participant sampling in a study of Baylisascaris procyonis roundworm seroprevalence among wildlife rehabilitators, United States and Canada, 2012–2015. Yellow dots indicate counties (USA) or township/municipality (Canada) in which enrolled persons reported practicing wildlife rehabilitation. Red dots indicate locations of seropositive persons. Shading of states/provinces indicates general state/province level prevalence of B. procyonis in raccoons based on published reports (1,8–11

Figure. Locations for participant sampling in a study of Baylisascaris procyonis roundworm seroprevalence among wildlife rehabilitators, United States and Canada, 2012–2015. Yellow dots indicate counties (USA) or township/municipality (Canada) in which enrolled persons reported practicing wildlife rehabilitation. Red dots indicate locations of seropositive persons. Shading of states/provinces indicates general state/province level prevalence of B. procyonis in raccoons based on published reports (1,811).

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1Current affiliation: Ronin Institute, Montclair, New Jersey, USA.

Page created: November 18, 2016
Page updated: November 18, 2016
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