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Volume 22, Number 5—May 2016
Research

Projecting Month of Birth for At-Risk Infants after Zika Virus Disease Outbreaks

Jennita ReefhuisComments to Author , Suzanne M. Gilboa, Michael A. Johansson, Diana Valencia, Regina M. Simeone, Susan L. Hills, Kara Polen, Denise J. Jamieson, Lyle R. Petersen, and Margaret A. Honein
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (J. Reefhuis, S.M. Gilboa, M.A. Johansson, D. Valencia, R.M. Simeone, K. Polen, D.J. Jamieson, M.A. Honein); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA (S.L. Hills, L.R. Petersen)

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Figure 1

Projection of birth months after Zika virus transmission and occurrence of microcephaly, Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil. Weekly pregnancy cohorts are based on 40-week pregnancies and monthly reports of infants with microcephaly in Bahia State, Brazil, in relation to periods of high risk for Zika virus transmission. The epidemic curve shows cases treated for illness with rash in Salvadore, Brazil, estimated from (14). Complete monthly report data for January–March 2016 are not yet available.

Figure 1. Projection of birth months after Zika virus transmission and occurrence of microcephaly, Salvador, Bahia State, Brazil. Weekly pregnancy cohorts are based on 40-week pregnancies and monthly reports of infants with microcephaly in Bahia State, Brazil, in relation to periods of high risk for Zika virus transmission. The epidemic curve shows cases treated for illness with rash in Salvadore, Brazil, estimated from (14). Complete monthly report data for January–March 2016 are not yet available.

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Page created: April 13, 2016
Page updated: April 13, 2016
Page reviewed: April 13, 2016
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