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Volume 22, Number 5—May 2016

Volume 22, Number 5—May 2016   PDF Version [PDF - 8.24 MB - 183 pages]

Perspective

  • An Operational Framework for Insecticide Resistance Management Planning PDF Version [PDF - 460 KB - 7 pages]
    E. Chanda et al.
    View Summary

    Country-wide planning and coordination can improve sustainability of vectorborne disease control.

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    Arthropod vectors transmit organisms that cause many emerging and reemerging diseases, and their control is reliant mainly on the use of chemical insecticides. Only a few classes of insecticides are available for public health use, and the increased spread of insecticide resistance is a major threat to sustainable disease control. The primary strategy for mitigating the detrimental effects of insecticide resistance is the development of an insecticide resistance management plan. However, few examples exist to show how to implement such plans programmatically. We describe the formulation and implementation of a resistance management plan for mosquito vectors of human disease in Zambia. We also discuss challenges, steps taken to address the challenges, and directions for the future.

        Cite This Article
    EID Chanda E, Thomsen EK, Musapa M, Kamuliwo M, Brogdon WG, Norris DE, et al. An Operational Framework for Insecticide Resistance Management Planning. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):773-779. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.150984
    AMA Chanda E, Thomsen EK, Musapa M, et al. An Operational Framework for Insecticide Resistance Management Planning. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):773-779. doi:10.3201/eid2205.150984.
    APA Chanda, E., Thomsen, E. K., Musapa, M., Kamuliwo, M., Brogdon, W. G., Norris, D. E....Coleman, M. (2016). An Operational Framework for Insecticide Resistance Management Planning. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 773-779. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.150984.
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Synopses

  • Medscape CME Activity
    Rickettsia parkeri Rickettsiosis, Arizona, USA PDF Version [PDF - 483 KB - 6 pages]
    K. L. Herrick et al.
    View Summary

    The likely vector was Amblyomma triste, a Neotropical tick species only recently recognized in the United States.

        View Abstract

    In the United States, all previously reported cases of Rickettsia parkeri rickettsiosis have been linked to transmission by the Gulf Coast tick (Amblyomma maculatum). Here we describe 1 confirmed and 1 probable case of R. parkeri rickettsiosis acquired in a mountainous region of southern Arizona, well beyond the recognized geographic range of A. maculatum ticks. The likely vector for these 2 infections was identified as the Amblyomma triste tick, a Neotropical species only recently recognized in the United States. Identification of R. parkeri rickettsiosis in southern Arizona demonstrates a need for local ecologic and epidemiologic assessments to better understand geographic distribution and define public health risk. Education and outreach aimed at persons recreating or working in this region of southern Arizona would improve awareness and promote prevention of tickborne rickettsioses.

        Cite This Article
    EID Herrick KL, Pena SA, Yaglom H, Layton BJ, Moors A, Loftis AD, et al. Rickettsia parkeri Rickettsiosis, Arizona, USA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):780-785. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151824
    AMA Herrick KL, Pena SA, Yaglom H, et al. Rickettsia parkeri Rickettsiosis, Arizona, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):780-785. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151824.
    APA Herrick, K. L., Pena, S. A., Yaglom, H., Layton, B. J., Moors, A., Loftis, A. D....Paddock, C. D. (2016). Rickettsia parkeri Rickettsiosis, Arizona, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 780-785. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151824.
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Research

  • Plasmodium falciparum K76T pfcrt Gene Mutations and Parasite Population Structure, Haiti, 2006–2009 PDF Version [PDF - 714 KB - 8 pages]
    M. Charles et al.
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    Low genetic diversity and low levels of chloroquine resistance among parasites suggest exogenous origin of reported cases.

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    Hispaniola is the only Caribbean island to which Plasmodium falciparum malaria remains endemic. Resistance to the antimalarial drug chloroquine has rarely been reported in Haiti, which is located on Hispaniola, but the K76T pfcrt (P. falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter) gene mutation that confers chloroquine resistance has been detected intermittently. We analyzed 901 patient samples collected during 2006–2009 and found 2 samples showed possible mixed parasite infections of genetically chloroquine-resistant and -sensitive parasites. Direct sequencing of the pfcrt resistance locus and single-nucleotide polymorphism barcoding did not definitively identify a resistant population, suggesting that sustained propagation of chloroquine-resistant parasites was not occurring in Haiti during the study period. Comparison of parasites from Haiti with those from Colombia, Panama, and Venezuela reveals a geographically distinct population with highly related parasites. Our findings indicate low genetic diversity in the parasite population and low levels of chloroquine resistance in Haiti, raising the possibility that reported cases may be of exogenous origin.

        Cite This Article
    EID Charles M, Das S, Daniels R, Kirkman L, Delva GG, Destine R, et al. Plasmodium falciparum K76T pfcrt Gene Mutations and Parasite Population Structure, Haiti, 2006–2009. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):786-793. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.150359
    AMA Charles M, Das S, Daniels R, et al. Plasmodium falciparum K76T pfcrt Gene Mutations and Parasite Population Structure, Haiti, 2006–2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):786-793. doi:10.3201/eid2205.150359.
    APA Charles, M., Das, S., Daniels, R., Kirkman, L., Delva, G. G., Destine, R....Golightly, L. M. (2016). Plasmodium falciparum K76T pfcrt Gene Mutations and Parasite Population Structure, Haiti, 2006–2009. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 786-793. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.150359.
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  • Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome at Tertiary Care Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, 2014 PDF Version [PDF - 608 KB - 8 pages]
    D. L. Hastings et al.
    View Summary

    Infection probably was transmitted in the emergency department, inpatient areas, and dialysis unit.

        View Abstract

    During March–May 2014, a Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outbreak occurred in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, that included many persons who worked or received medical treatment at King Fahd General Hospital. We investigated 78 persons who had laboratory-confirmed MERS during March 2–May 10 and documented contact at this hospital. The 78 persons with MERS comprised 53 patients, 16 healthcare workers, and 9 visitors. Among the 53 patients, the most probable sites of acquisition were the emergency department (22 patients), inpatient areas (17), dialysis unit (11), and outpatient areas (3). Infection control deficiencies included limited separation of suspected MERS patients, patient crowding, and inconsistent use of infection control precautions; aggressive improvements in these deficiencies preceded a decline in cases. MERS coronavirus transmission probably was multifocal, occurring in multiple hospital settings. Continued vigilance and strict application of infection control precautions are necessary to prevent future MERS outbreaks.

        Cite This Article
    EID Hastings DL, Tokars JI, Abdel Aziz I, Alkhaldi KZ, Bensadek AT, Alraddadi BM, et al. Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome at Tertiary Care Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, 2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):794-801. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151797
    AMA Hastings DL, Tokars JI, Abdel Aziz I, et al. Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome at Tertiary Care Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):794-801. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151797.
    APA Hastings, D. L., Tokars, J. I., Abdel Aziz, I., Alkhaldi, K. Z., Bensadek, A. T., Alraddadi, B. M....Madani, T. A. (2016). Outbreak of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome at Tertiary Care Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 794-801. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151797.
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  • Expansion of Shiga Toxin–Producing Escherichia coli by Use of Bovine Antibiotic Growth Promoters PDF Version [PDF - 738 KB - 8 pages]
    J. Kim et al.
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    These growth promoters facilitate transfer of Shiga toxin–encoding phages in E. coli.

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    Antibiotics are routinely used in food-producing animals to promote growth and prevent infectious diseases. We investigated the effects of bovine antibiotic growth promoters (bAGPs) on the propagation and spread of Shiga toxin (Stx)–encoding phages in Escherichia coli. Co-culture of E. coli O157:H7 and other E. coli isolated from cattle in the presence of sublethal concentrations of bAGPs significantly increased the emergence of non-O157, Stx-producing E. coli by triggering the SOS response system in E. coli O157:H7. The most substantial mediation of Stx phage transmission was induced by oxytetracyline and chlortetracycline, which are commonly used in agriculture. bAGPs may therefore contribute to the expansion of pathogenic Stx-producing E. coli.

        Cite This Article
    EID Kim J, Chui L, Wang Y, Shen J, Jeon B. Expansion of Shiga Toxin–Producing Escherichia coli by Use of Bovine Antibiotic Growth Promoters. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):802-809. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151584
    AMA Kim J, Chui L, Wang Y, et al. Expansion of Shiga Toxin–Producing Escherichia coli by Use of Bovine Antibiotic Growth Promoters. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):802-809. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151584.
    APA Kim, J., Chui, L., Wang, Y., Shen, J., & Jeon, B. (2016). Expansion of Shiga Toxin–Producing Escherichia coli by Use of Bovine Antibiotic Growth Promoters. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 802-809. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151584.
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  • Acute Human Inkoo and Chatanga Virus Infections, Finland PDF Version [PDF - 499 KB - 8 pages]
    N. Putkuri et al.
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    Most cases appeared to be subclinical, but a few patients, usually children, required hospitalization.

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    Inkoo virus (INKV) and Chatanga virus (CHATV), which are circulating in Finland, are mosquitoborne California serogroup orthobunyaviruses that have a high seroprevalence among humans. Worldwide, INKV infection has been poorly described, and CHATV infection has been unknown. Using serum samples collected in Finland from 7,961 patients suspected of having viral neurologic disease or Puumala virus infection during the summers of 2001–2013, we analyzed the samples to detect California serogroup infections. IgM seropositivity revealed 17 acute infections, and cross-neutralization tests confirmed presence of INKV or CHATV infections. All children (<16 years of age) with INKV infection were hospitalized; adults were outpatients with mild disease, except for 1 who was hospitalized with CHATV infection. Symptoms included fever, influenza-like illness, nausea or vomiting, disorientation, nuchal rigidity, headache, drowsiness, and seizures. Although many INKV and CHATV infections appear to be subclinical, these viruses can cause more severe disease, especially in children.

        Cite This Article
    EID Putkuri N, Kantele A, Levanov L, Kivistö I, Brummer-Korvenkontio M, Vaheri A, et al. Acute Human Inkoo and Chatanga Virus Infections, Finland. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):810-817. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151015
    AMA Putkuri N, Kantele A, Levanov L, et al. Acute Human Inkoo and Chatanga Virus Infections, Finland. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):810-817. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151015.
    APA Putkuri, N., Kantele, A., Levanov, L., Kivistö, I., Brummer-Korvenkontio, M., Vaheri, A....Vapalahti, O. (2016). Acute Human Inkoo and Chatanga Virus Infections, Finland. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 810-817. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151015.
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  • Differences in Genotype, Clinical Features, and Inflammatory Potential of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto Strains from Europe and the United States PDF Version [PDF - 806 KB - 10 pages]
    T. Cerar et al.
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    Strains from the United States are more virulent and have greater inflammatory potential.

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    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto isolates from patients with erythema migrans in Europe and the United States were compared by genotype, clinical features of infection, and inflammatory potential. Analysis of outer surface protein C and multilocus sequence typing showed that strains from these 2 regions represent distinct genotypes. Clinical features of infection with B. burgdorferi in Slovenia were similar to infection with B. afzelii or B. garinii, the other 2 Borrelia spp. that cause disease in Europe, whereas B. burgdorferi strains from the United States were associated with more severe disease. Moreover, B. burgdorferi strains from the United States induced peripheral blood mononuclear cells to secrete higher levels of cytokines and chemokines associated with innate and Th1-adaptive immune responses, whereas strains from Europe induced greater Th17-associated responses. Thus, strains of the same B. burgdorferi species from Europe and the United States represent distinct clonal lineages that vary in virulence and inflammatory potential.

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    EID Cerar T, Strle F, Stupica D, Ruzic-Sabljic E, McHugh G, Steere AC, et al. Differences in Genotype, Clinical Features, and Inflammatory Potential of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto Strains from Europe and the United States. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):818-827. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151806
    AMA Cerar T, Strle F, Stupica D, et al. Differences in Genotype, Clinical Features, and Inflammatory Potential of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto Strains from Europe and the United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):818-827. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151806.
    APA Cerar, T., Strle, F., Stupica, D., Ruzic-Sabljic, E., McHugh, G., Steere, A. C....Strle, K. (2016). Differences in Genotype, Clinical Features, and Inflammatory Potential of Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto Strains from Europe and the United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 818-827. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151806.
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  • Projecting Month of Birth for At-Risk Infants after Zika Virus Disease Outbreaks PDF Version [PDF - 378 KB - 5 pages]
    J. Reefhuis et al.
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    A modifiable spreadsheet tool will enable health officials to plan for these births.

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    The marked increase in infants born with microcephaly in Brazil after a 2015 outbreak of Zika virus (Zika virus) disease suggests an association between maternal Zika virus infection and congenital microcephaly. To project the timing of delivery of infants born to mothers infected during early pregnancy in 1 city in Bahia State, Brazil, we incorporated data on reported Zika virus disease cases and microcephaly cases into a graphical schematic of weekly birth cohorts. We projected that these births would occur through February 2016. Applying similar projections to a hypothetical location at which Zika virus transmission started in November, we projected that full-term infants at risk for Zika virus infection would be born during April–September 2016. We also developed a modifiable spreadsheet tool that public health officials and researchers can use for their countries to plan for deliveries of infants to women who were infected with Zika virus during different pregnancy trimesters.

        Cite This Article
    EID Reefhuis J, Gilboa SM, Johansson MA, Valencia D, Simeone RM, Hills SL, et al. Projecting Month of Birth for At-Risk Infants after Zika Virus Disease Outbreaks. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):828-832. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.160290
    AMA Reefhuis J, Gilboa SM, Johansson MA, et al. Projecting Month of Birth for At-Risk Infants after Zika Virus Disease Outbreaks. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):828-832. doi:10.3201/eid2205.160290.
    APA Reefhuis, J., Gilboa, S. M., Johansson, M. A., Valencia, D., Simeone, R. M., Hills, S. L....Honein, M. A. (2016). Projecting Month of Birth for At-Risk Infants after Zika Virus Disease Outbreaks. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 828-832. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.160290.
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  • Genetic Characterization of Archived Bunyaviruses and their Potential for Emergence in Australia PDF Version [PDF - 660 KB - 8 pages]
    B. Huang et al.
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    Genetic relationships between bunyaviruses from Australia and pathogenic bunyaviruses from elsewhere indicate emergence potential.

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    To better understand the diversity of bunyaviruses and their circulation in Australia, we sequenced 5 viruses (Gan Gan, Trubanaman, Kowanyama, Yacaaba, and Taggert) isolated and serologically identified 4 decades ago as members of the family Bunyaviridae. Gan Gan and Trubanaman viruses almost perfectly matched 2 recently isolated, purportedly novel viruses, Salt Ash and Murrumbidgee viruses, respectively. Kowanyama and Yacaaba viruses were identified as being related to members of a large clade containing pathogenic viruses. Taggert virus was confirmed as being a nairovirus; several viruses of this genus are pathogenic to humans. The genetic relationships and historical experimental infections in mice reveal the potential for these viruses to lead to disease emergence.

        Cite This Article
    EID Huang B, Firth C, Watterson D, Allcock R, Colmant A, Hobson-Peters J, et al. Genetic Characterization of Archived Bunyaviruses and their Potential for Emergence in Australia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):833-840. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151566
    AMA Huang B, Firth C, Watterson D, et al. Genetic Characterization of Archived Bunyaviruses and their Potential for Emergence in Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):833-840. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151566.
    APA Huang, B., Firth, C., Watterson, D., Allcock, R., Colmant, A., Hobson-Peters, J....Warrilow, D. (2016). Genetic Characterization of Archived Bunyaviruses and their Potential for Emergence in Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 833-840. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151566.
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  • Plasmodium falciparum In Vitro Resistance to Monodesethylamodiaquine, Dakar, Senegal, 2014 PDF Version [PDF - 342 KB - 5 pages]
    B. Fall et al.
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    In vitro and in vivo surveillance of all artemisinin-based combination therapy partners is warranted.

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    We successfully cultured 36 Plasmodium falciparum isolates from blood samples of 44 malaria patients admitted to the Hôpital Principal de Dakar (Dakar, Senegal) during August–December 2014. The prevalence of isolates with in vitro reduced susceptibility was 30.6% for monodesethylamodiaquine, 52.8% for chloroquine, 44.1% for mefloquine, 16.7% for doxycycline, 11.8% for piperaquine, 8.3% for artesunate, 5.9% for pyronaridine, 2.8% for quinine and dihydroartemisinin, and 0.0% for lumefantrine. The prevalence of isolates with reduced in vitro susceptibility to the artemisinin-based combination therapy partner monodesethylamodiaquine increased from 5.6% in 2013 to 30.6% in 2014. Because of the increased prevalence of P. falciparum parasites with impaired in vitro susceptibility to monodesethylamodiaquine, the implementation of in vitro and in vivo surveillance of all artemisinin-based combination therapy partners is warranted.

        Cite This Article
    EID Fall B, Madamet M, Camara C, Amalvict R, Fall M, Nakoulima A, et al. Plasmodium falciparum In Vitro Resistance to Monodesethylamodiaquine, Dakar, Senegal, 2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):841-845. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151321
    AMA Fall B, Madamet M, Camara C, et al. Plasmodium falciparum In Vitro Resistance to Monodesethylamodiaquine, Dakar, Senegal, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):841-845. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151321.
    APA Fall, B., Madamet, M., Camara, C., Amalvict, R., Fall, M., Nakoulima, A....Pradines, B. (2016). Plasmodium falciparum In Vitro Resistance to Monodesethylamodiaquine, Dakar, Senegal, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 841-845. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151321.
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  • Astrovirus MLB2, a New Gastroenteric Virus Associated with Meningitis and Disseminated Infection PDF Version [PDF - 579 KB - 8 pages]
    S. Cordey et al.
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    This virus is an unrecognized cause of central nervous system infection, particularly among immunocompromised patients.

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    Next-generation sequencing has identified novel astroviruses for which a pathogenic role is not clearly defined. We identified astrovirus MLB2 infection in an immunocompetent case-patient and an immunocompromised patient who experienced diverse clinical manifestations, notably, meningitis and disseminated infection. The initial case-patient was identified by next-generation sequencing, which revealed astrovirus MLB2 RNA in cerebrospinal fluid, plasma, urine, and anal swab specimens. We then used specific real-time reverse transcription PCR to screen 943 fecal and 424 cerebrospinal fluid samples from hospitalized patients and identified a second case of meningitis, with positive results for the agent in the patient’s feces and plasma. This screening revealed 5 additional positive fecal samples: 1 from an infant with acute diarrhea and 4 from children who had received transplants. Our findings demonstrate that astrovirus MLB2, which is highly prevalent in feces, can disseminate outside the digestive tract and is an unrecognized cause of central nervous system infection.

        Cite This Article
    EID Cordey S, Vu D, Schibler M, L’Huillier AG, Brito F, Docquier M, et al. Astrovirus MLB2, a New Gastroenteric Virus Associated with Meningitis and Disseminated Infection. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):846-853. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151807
    AMA Cordey S, Vu D, Schibler M, et al. Astrovirus MLB2, a New Gastroenteric Virus Associated with Meningitis and Disseminated Infection. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):846-853. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151807.
    APA Cordey, S., Vu, D., Schibler, M., L’Huillier, A. G., Brito, F., Docquier, M....Kaiser, L. (2016). Astrovirus MLB2, a New Gastroenteric Virus Associated with Meningitis and Disseminated Infection. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 846-853. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151807.
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  • Medscape CME Activity
    Spectrum of Viral Pathogens in Blood of Returned, Malaria-Free, Ill Travelers from Canada PDF Version [PDF - 453 KB - 8 pages]
    R. Kariyawasam et al.
    View Summary

    Over a 2-year period, common and emerging viruses were documented in >20% of these travelers.

            Cite This Article
    EID Kariyawasam R, Lau R, Eshaghi A, Patel SN, Sider D, Gubbay JB, et al. Spectrum of Viral Pathogens in Blood of Returned, Malaria-Free, Ill Travelers from Canada. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):854-861. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151875
    AMA Kariyawasam R, Lau R, Eshaghi A, et al. Spectrum of Viral Pathogens in Blood of Returned, Malaria-Free, Ill Travelers from Canada. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):854-861. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151875.
    APA Kariyawasam, R., Lau, R., Eshaghi, A., Patel, S. N., Sider, D., Gubbay, J. B....Boggild, A. (2016). Spectrum of Viral Pathogens in Blood of Returned, Malaria-Free, Ill Travelers from Canada. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 854-861. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151875.
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  • Expanded Geographic Distribution and Clinical Characteristics of Ehrlichia ewingii Infections, United States PDF Version [PDF - 352 KB - 4 pages]
    R. M. Harris et al.
    View Summary

    This bacterium should be considered as an etiologic agent of tickborne illness that might be missed by serologic testing.

        View Abstract

    Ehrlichiosis is a bacterial zoonosis, spread through the bites of infected ticks, that is most commonly caused in the United States by infection with the bacterium Ehrlichia chaffeensis. We retrospectively reviewed samples from an 18-month study of ehrlichiosis in the United States and found that E. ewingii was present in 10 (9.2%) of 109 case-patients with ehrlichiosis, a higher rate of infection with this species than had previously been reported. Two patients resided in New Jersey and Indiana, where cases have not been reported. All patients with available case histories recovered. Our study suggests a higher prevalence and wider geographic distribution of E. ewingii in the United States than previous reports have indicated.

        Cite This Article
    EID Harris RM, Couturier BA, Sample SC, Coulter KS, Casey KK, Schlaberg R, et al. Expanded Geographic Distribution and Clinical Characteristics of Ehrlichia ewingii Infections, United States. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):862-865. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.152009
    AMA Harris RM, Couturier BA, Sample SC, et al. Expanded Geographic Distribution and Clinical Characteristics of Ehrlichia ewingii Infections, United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):862-865. doi:10.3201/eid2205.152009.
    APA Harris, R. M., Couturier, B. A., Sample, S. C., Coulter, K. S., Casey, K. K., & Schlaberg, R. (2016). Expanded Geographic Distribution and Clinical Characteristics of Ehrlichia ewingii Infections, United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 862-865. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.152009.
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Dispatches

  • Molecular Characterization of Canine Rabies Virus, Mali, 2006–2013 PDF Version [PDF - 516 KB - 5 pages]
    A. Traoré et al.
        View Abstract

    We genetically characterized 32 canine rabies viruses isolated in Mali during 2006–2013 and identified 3 subgroups that belonged to the Africa 2 lineage. We also detected subgroup F rabies virus. This information should be useful for development of mass vaccination campaigns for dogs and eventual large-scale control programs in this country.

        Cite This Article
    EID Traoré A, Picard-Meyer E, Mauti S, Biarnais M, Balmer O, Samaké K, et al. Molecular Characterization of Canine Rabies Virus, Mali, 2006–2013. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):866-870. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.150470
    AMA Traoré A, Picard-Meyer E, Mauti S, et al. Molecular Characterization of Canine Rabies Virus, Mali, 2006–2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):866-870. doi:10.3201/eid2205.150470.
    APA Traoré, A., Picard-Meyer, E., Mauti, S., Biarnais, M., Balmer, O., Samaké, K....Cliquet, F. (2016). Molecular Characterization of Canine Rabies Virus, Mali, 2006–2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 866-870. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.150470.
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  • Fatal Monocytic Ehrlichiosis in Woman, Mexico, 2013 PDF Version [PDF - 448 KB - 4 pages]
    C. G. Sosa-Gutierrez et al.
        View Abstract

    Human monocytic ehrlichiosis is a febrile illness caused by Ehrlichia chaffeensis, an intracellular bacterium transmitted by ticks. In Mexico, a case of E. chaffeensis infection in an immunocompetent 31-year-old woman without recognized tick bite was fatal. This diagnosis should be considered for patients with fever, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated liver enzyme levels.

        Cite This Article
    EID Sosa-Gutierrez CG, Solorzano-Santos F, Walker D, Torres J, Serrano CA, Gordillo-Perez G, et al. Fatal Monocytic Ehrlichiosis in Woman, Mexico, 2013. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):871-874. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151217
    AMA Sosa-Gutierrez CG, Solorzano-Santos F, Walker D, et al. Fatal Monocytic Ehrlichiosis in Woman, Mexico, 2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):871-874. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151217.
    APA Sosa-Gutierrez, C. G., Solorzano-Santos, F., Walker, D., Torres, J., Serrano, C. A., & Gordillo-Perez, G. (2016). Fatal Monocytic Ehrlichiosis in Woman, Mexico, 2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 871-874. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151217.
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  • Increased Rotavirus Prevalence in Diarrheal Outbreak Precipitated by Localized Flooding, Solomon Islands, 2014 PDF Version [PDF - 1.82 MB - 5 pages]
    F. K. Jones et al.
        View Abstract

    Flooding on 1 of the Solomon Islands precipitated a nationwide epidemic of diarrhea that spread to regions unaffected by flooding and caused >6,000 cases and 27 deaths. Rotavirus was identified in 38% of case-patients tested in the city with the most flooding. Outbreak potential related to weather reinforces the need for global rotavirus vaccination.

        Cite This Article
    EID Jones FK, Ko AI, Becha C, Joshua C, Musto J, Thomas S, et al. Increased Rotavirus Prevalence in Diarrheal Outbreak Precipitated by Localized Flooding, Solomon Islands, 2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):875-879. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151743
    AMA Jones FK, Ko AI, Becha C, et al. Increased Rotavirus Prevalence in Diarrheal Outbreak Precipitated by Localized Flooding, Solomon Islands, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):875-879. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151743.
    APA Jones, F. K., Ko, A. I., Becha, C., Joshua, C., Musto, J., Thomas, S....Nilles, E. J. (2016). Increased Rotavirus Prevalence in Diarrheal Outbreak Precipitated by Localized Flooding, Solomon Islands, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 875-879. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151743.
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  • Rickettsia sibirica mongolitimonae Infection, France, 2010–2014 PDF Version [PDF - 447 KB - 3 pages]
    E. Angelakis et al.
        View Abstract

    To further characterize human infections caused by Rickettsia sibirica mongolitimonae, we tested skin biopsy and swab samples and analyzed clinical, epidemiologic, and diagnostic characteristics of patients with a rickettsiosis. The most common (38%) indigenous species was R. sibirica mongolitimonae. Significantly more cases of R. sibirica mongolitimonae infection occurred during spring and summer.

        Cite This Article
    EID Angelakis E, Richet H, Raoult D. Rickettsia sibirica mongolitimonae Infection, France, 2010–2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):880-882. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.141989
    AMA Angelakis E, Richet H, Raoult D. Rickettsia sibirica mongolitimonae Infection, France, 2010–2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):880-882. doi:10.3201/eid2205.141989.
    APA Angelakis, E., Richet, H., & Raoult, D. (2016). Rickettsia sibirica mongolitimonae Infection, France, 2010–2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 880-882. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.141989.
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  • Q Fever, Scrub Typhus, and Rickettsial Diseases in Children, Kenya, 2011–2012 PDF Version [PDF - 408 KB - 4 pages]
    A. N. Maina et al.
        View Abstract

    To increase knowledge of undifferentiated fevers in Kenya, we tested paired serum samples from febrile children in western Kenya for antibodies against pathogens increasingly recognized to cause febrile illness in Africa. Of patients assessed, 8.9%, 22.4%, 1.1%, and 3.6% had enhanced seroreactivity to Coxiella burnetii, spotted fever group rickettsiae, typhus group rickettsiae, and scrub typhus group orientiae, respectively.

        Cite This Article
    EID Maina AN, Farris CM, Odhiambo A, Jiang J, Laktabai J, Armstrong J, et al. Q Fever, Scrub Typhus, and Rickettsial Diseases in Children, Kenya, 2011–2012. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):883-886. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.150953
    AMA Maina AN, Farris CM, Odhiambo A, et al. Q Fever, Scrub Typhus, and Rickettsial Diseases in Children, Kenya, 2011–2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):883-886. doi:10.3201/eid2205.150953.
    APA Maina, A. N., Farris, C. M., Odhiambo, A., Jiang, J., Laktabai, J., Armstrong, J....O’Meara, W. P. (2016). Q Fever, Scrub Typhus, and Rickettsial Diseases in Children, Kenya, 2011–2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 883-886. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.150953.
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  • Molecular Characterization of Chikungunya Virus, Philippines, 2011–2013 PDF Version [PDF - 459 KB - 4 pages]
    A. Sy et al.
        View Abstract

    During 2011–2013, a nationwide outbreak of chikungunya virus infection occurred in the Philippines. The Asian genotype was identified as the predominant genotype; sporadic cases of the East/Central/South African genotype were detected in Mindanao. Further monitoring is needed to define the transmission pattern of this virus in the Philippines.

        Cite This Article
    EID Sy A, Saito-Obata M, Medado I, Tohma K, Dapat C, Segubre-Mercado E, et al. Molecular Characterization of Chikungunya Virus, Philippines, 2011–2013. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):887-890. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151268
    AMA Sy A, Saito-Obata M, Medado I, et al. Molecular Characterization of Chikungunya Virus, Philippines, 2011–2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):887-890. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151268.
    APA Sy, A., Saito-Obata, M., Medado, I., Tohma, K., Dapat, C., Segubre-Mercado, E....Oshitani, H. (2016). Molecular Characterization of Chikungunya Virus, Philippines, 2011–2013. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 887-890. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151268.
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  • Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Associated with Chikungunya Virus Infection, Guadeloupe, 2014 PDF Version [PDF - 307 KB - 4 pages]
    A. Rollé et al.
        View Abstract

    During a 2014 outbreak, 450 patients with confirmed chikungunya virus infection were admitted to the University Hospital of Pointe-à-Pitre, Guadeloupe. Of these, 110 were nonpregnant adults; 42 had severe disease, and of those, 25 had severe sepsis or septic shock and 12 died. Severe sepsis may be a rare complication of chikungunya virus infection.

        Cite This Article
    EID Rollé A, Schepers K, Cassadou S, Curlier E, Madeux B, Hermann-Storck C, et al. Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Associated with Chikungunya Virus Infection, Guadeloupe, 2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):891-894. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151449
    AMA Rollé A, Schepers K, Cassadou S, et al. Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Associated with Chikungunya Virus Infection, Guadeloupe, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):891-894. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151449.
    APA Rollé, A., Schepers, K., Cassadou, S., Curlier, E., Madeux, B., Hermann-Storck, C....Hoen, B. (2016). Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock Associated with Chikungunya Virus Infection, Guadeloupe, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 891-894. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151449.
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  • Clinical, Virologic, and Epidemiologic Characteristics of Dengue Outbreak, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 2014 PDF Version [PDF - 487 KB - 5 pages]
    F. Vairo et al.
        View Abstract

    We investigated a dengue outbreak in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, in 2014, that was caused by dengue virus (DENV) serotype 2. DENV infection was present in 101 (20.9%) of 483 patients. Patient age and location of residence were associated with infection. Seven (4.0%) of 176 patients were co-infected with malaria and DENV.

        Cite This Article
    EID Vairo F, Mboera L, De Nardo P, Oriyo NM, Meschi S, Rumisha SF, et al. Clinical, Virologic, and Epidemiologic Characteristics of Dengue Outbreak, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 2014. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):895-899. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151462
    AMA Vairo F, Mboera L, De Nardo P, et al. Clinical, Virologic, and Epidemiologic Characteristics of Dengue Outbreak, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):895-899. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151462.
    APA Vairo, F., Mboera, L., De Nardo, P., Oriyo, N. M., Meschi, S., Rumisha, S. F....Ippolito, G. (2016). Clinical, Virologic, and Epidemiologic Characteristics of Dengue Outbreak, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, 2014. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 895-899. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151462.
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  • Fatal Septicemia Linked to Transmission of MRSA Clonal Complex 398 in Hospital and Nursing Home, Denmark PDF Version [PDF - 346 KB - 3 pages]
    R. Nielsen et al.
        View Abstract

    We describe 2 fatal cases of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 398 septicemia in persons who had no contact with livestock. Whole-genome sequencing of the isolated MRSA strains strongly suggest that both were of animal origin and that the patients had been infected through 2 independent person-to-person transmission chains.

        Cite This Article
    EID Nielsen R, Kemp M, Holm A, Skov M, Detlefsen M, Hasman H, et al. Fatal Septicemia Linked to Transmission of MRSA Clonal Complex 398 in Hospital and Nursing Home, Denmark. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):900-902. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151835
    AMA Nielsen R, Kemp M, Holm A, et al. Fatal Septicemia Linked to Transmission of MRSA Clonal Complex 398 in Hospital and Nursing Home, Denmark. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):900-902. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151835.
    APA Nielsen, R., Kemp, M., Holm, A., Skov, M., Detlefsen, M., Hasman, H....Kolmos, H. (2016). Fatal Septicemia Linked to Transmission of MRSA Clonal Complex 398 in Hospital and Nursing Home, Denmark. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 900-902. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151835.
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  • Malaria Hyperendemicity and Risk for Artemisinin Resistance among Illegal Gold Miners, French Guiana PDF Version [PDF - 479 KB - 4 pages]
    V. Pommier de Santi et al.
        View Abstract

    To assess the prevalence of malaria among illegal gold miners in the French Guiana rainforest, we screened 205 miners during May–June 2014. Malaria prevalence was 48.3%; 48.5% of cases were asymptomatic. Patients reported self-medication with artemisinin-based combination therapy. Risk for emergence and spread of artemisinin resistance among gold miners in the rainforest is high.

        Cite This Article
    EID Pommier de Santi V, Djossou F, Barthes N, Bogreau H, Hyvert G, Nguyen C, et al. Malaria Hyperendemicity and Risk for Artemisinin Resistance among Illegal Gold Miners, French Guiana. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):903-906. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151957
    AMA Pommier de Santi V, Djossou F, Barthes N, et al. Malaria Hyperendemicity and Risk for Artemisinin Resistance among Illegal Gold Miners, French Guiana. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):903-906. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151957.
    APA Pommier de Santi, V., Djossou, F., Barthes, N., Bogreau, H., Hyvert, G., Nguyen, C....Briolant, S. (2016). Malaria Hyperendemicity and Risk for Artemisinin Resistance among Illegal Gold Miners, French Guiana. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 903-906. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151957.
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  • Linkage to Care for Suburban Heroin Users with Hepatitis C Virus Infection, New Jersey, USA PDF Version [PDF - 345 KB - 3 pages]
    E. Akyar et al.
        View Abstract

    We identified a 41.4% prevalence of hepatitis C virus, absence of HIV, and unexpectedly high frequency of hepatitis C virus genotype 3 among suburban New Jersey heroin users 17–35 years of age during 2014–2015. Despite 2 clinicians prepared to engage these users, few were successfully linked to care and treated.

        Cite This Article
    EID Akyar E, Seneca KH, Akyar S, Schofield N, Schwartz MP, Nahass RG, et al. Linkage to Care for Suburban Heroin Users with Hepatitis C Virus Infection, New Jersey, USA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):907-909. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151980
    AMA Akyar E, Seneca KH, Akyar S, et al. Linkage to Care for Suburban Heroin Users with Hepatitis C Virus Infection, New Jersey, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):907-909. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151980.
    APA Akyar, E., Seneca, K. H., Akyar, S., Schofield, N., Schwartz, M. P., & Nahass, R. G. (2016). Linkage to Care for Suburban Heroin Users with Hepatitis C Virus Infection, New Jersey, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 907-909. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151980.
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Commentaries

Letters

  • Reactivation of Ocular Toxoplasmosis in Non-Hispanic Persons, Misiones Province, Argentina PDF Version [PDF - 631 KB - 2 pages]
    M. Rudzinski et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Rudzinski M, Khoury M, Couto C, Ajzenberg D. Reactivation of Ocular Toxoplasmosis in Non-Hispanic Persons, Misiones Province, Argentina. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):912-913. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.150025
    AMA Rudzinski M, Khoury M, Couto C, et al. Reactivation of Ocular Toxoplasmosis in Non-Hispanic Persons, Misiones Province, Argentina. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):912-913. doi:10.3201/eid2205.150025.
    APA Rudzinski, M., Khoury, M., Couto, C., & Ajzenberg, D. (2016). Reactivation of Ocular Toxoplasmosis in Non-Hispanic Persons, Misiones Province, Argentina. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 912-913. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.150025.
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  • Tropical Islands as New Hubs for Emerging Arboviruses PDF Version [PDF - 332 KB - 3 pages]
    V. Cao-Lormeau
            Cite This Article
    EID Cao-Lormeau V. Tropical Islands as New Hubs for Emerging Arboviruses. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):913-915. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.150547
    AMA Cao-Lormeau V. Tropical Islands as New Hubs for Emerging Arboviruses. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):913-915. doi:10.3201/eid2205.150547.
    APA Cao-Lormeau, V. (2016). Tropical Islands as New Hubs for Emerging Arboviruses. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 913-915. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.150547.
        Email Email this Article
  • Seroepidemiologic Screening for Zoonotic Viral Infections, Maputo, Mozambique PDF Version [PDF - 301 KB - 3 pages]
    E. Gudo et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Gudo E, Lesko B, Vene S, Lagerqvist N, Candido S, Razão de Deus N, et al. Seroepidemiologic Screening for Zoonotic Viral Infections, Maputo, Mozambique. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):915-917. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151002
    AMA Gudo E, Lesko B, Vene S, et al. Seroepidemiologic Screening for Zoonotic Viral Infections, Maputo, Mozambique. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):915-917. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151002.
    APA Gudo, E., Lesko, B., Vene, S., Lagerqvist, N., Candido, S., Razão de Deus, N....Falk, K. I. (2016). Seroepidemiologic Screening for Zoonotic Viral Infections, Maputo, Mozambique. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 915-917. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151002.
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  • Hemorrhagic Diathesis in Borrelia recurrentis Infection Imported to Germany PDF Version [PDF - 481 KB - 3 pages]
    C. Keller et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Keller C, Zumblick M, Streubel K, Eickmann M, Müller D, Kerwat M, et al. Hemorrhagic Diathesis in Borrelia recurrentis Infection Imported to Germany. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):917-919. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151557
    AMA Keller C, Zumblick M, Streubel K, et al. Hemorrhagic Diathesis in Borrelia recurrentis Infection Imported to Germany. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):917-919. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151557.
    APA Keller, C., Zumblick, M., Streubel, K., Eickmann, M., Müller, D., Kerwat, M....Gress, T. (2016). Hemorrhagic Diathesis in Borrelia recurrentis Infection Imported to Germany. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 917-919. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151557.
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  • Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus IgG in Goats, Bhutan PDF Version [PDF - 277 KB - 2 pages]
    S. Wangchuk et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Wangchuk S, Pelden S, Dorji T, Tenzin S, Thapa B, Zangmo S, et al. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus IgG in Goats, Bhutan. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):919-920. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151777
    AMA Wangchuk S, Pelden S, Dorji T, et al. Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus IgG in Goats, Bhutan. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):919-920. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151777.
    APA Wangchuk, S., Pelden, S., Dorji, T., Tenzin, S., Thapa, B., Zangmo, S....Tenzin, T. (2016). Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus IgG in Goats, Bhutan. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 919-920. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151777.
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  • Community-Associated MRSA Infection in Remote Amazon Basin Area, Peru PDF Version [PDF - 307 KB - 2 pages]
    C. García et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID García C, Astocondor L, Reyes J, Carvajal LP, Arias CA, Seas C, et al. Community-Associated MRSA Infection in Remote Amazon Basin Area, Peru. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):921-922. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151881
    AMA García C, Astocondor L, Reyes J, et al. Community-Associated MRSA Infection in Remote Amazon Basin Area, Peru. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):921-922. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151881.
    APA García, C., Astocondor, L., Reyes, J., Carvajal, L. P., Arias, C. A., & Seas, C. (2016). Community-Associated MRSA Infection in Remote Amazon Basin Area, Peru. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 921-922. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151881.
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  • Exposure to Bat-Associated Bartonella spp. among Humans and Other Animals, Ghana PDF Version [PDF - 285 KB - 3 pages]
    A. O. Mannerings et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Mannerings AO, Osikowicz LM, Restif O, Nyarko E, Suu-Ire R, Cunningham AA, et al. Exposure to Bat-Associated Bartonella spp. among Humans and Other Animals, Ghana. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):922-924. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151908
    AMA Mannerings AO, Osikowicz LM, Restif O, et al. Exposure to Bat-Associated Bartonella spp. among Humans and Other Animals, Ghana. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):922-924. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151908.
    APA Mannerings, A. O., Osikowicz, L. M., Restif, O., Nyarko, E., Suu-Ire, R., Cunningham, A. A....Kosoy, M. Y. (2016). Exposure to Bat-Associated Bartonella spp. among Humans and Other Animals, Ghana. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 922-924. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151908.
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  • Isolation of Zika Virus from Febrile Patient, Indonesia PDF Version [PDF - 300 KB - 2 pages]
    A. Perkasa et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Perkasa A, Yudhaputri F, Haryanto S, Hayati RF, Ma’roef C, Antonjaya U, et al. Isolation of Zika Virus from Febrile Patient, Indonesia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):924-925. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151915
    AMA Perkasa A, Yudhaputri F, Haryanto S, et al. Isolation of Zika Virus from Febrile Patient, Indonesia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):924-925. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151915.
    APA Perkasa, A., Yudhaputri, F., Haryanto, S., Hayati, R. F., Ma’roef, C., Antonjaya, U....Sasmono, R. (2016). Isolation of Zika Virus from Febrile Patient, Indonesia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 924-925. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151915.
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  • Fatal Sickle Cell Disease and Zika Virus Infection in Girl from Colombia PDF Version [PDF - 343 KB - 3 pages]
    L. Arzuza-Ortega et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Arzuza-Ortega L, Polo A, Pérez-Tatis G, López-García H, Parra E, Pardo-Herrera LC, et al. Fatal Sickle Cell Disease and Zika Virus Infection in Girl from Colombia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):925-927. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151934
    AMA Arzuza-Ortega L, Polo A, Pérez-Tatis G, et al. Fatal Sickle Cell Disease and Zika Virus Infection in Girl from Colombia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):925-927. doi:10.3201/eid2205.151934.
    APA Arzuza-Ortega, L., Polo, A., Pérez-Tatis, G., López-García, H., Parra, E., Pardo-Herrera, L. C....Rodríguez-Morales, A. J. (2016). Fatal Sickle Cell Disease and Zika Virus Infection in Girl from Colombia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 925-927. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.151934.
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  • Detection of Autochthonous Zika Virus Transmission in Sincelejo, Colombia PDF Version [PDF - 323 KB - 3 pages]
    E. Camacho et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Camacho E, Paternina-Gomez M, Blanco PJ, Osorio JE, Aliota MT. Detection of Autochthonous Zika Virus Transmission in Sincelejo, Colombia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):927-929. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.160023
    AMA Camacho E, Paternina-Gomez M, Blanco PJ, et al. Detection of Autochthonous Zika Virus Transmission in Sincelejo, Colombia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):927-929. doi:10.3201/eid2205.160023.
    APA Camacho, E., Paternina-Gomez, M., Blanco, P. J., Osorio, J. E., & Aliota, M. T. (2016). Detection of Autochthonous Zika Virus Transmission in Sincelejo, Colombia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 927-929. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.160023.
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  • Health Precautions Taken by Travelers to Countries with Ebola Virus Disease PDF Version [PDF - 323 KB - 3 pages]
    I. Ezeoke et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Ezeoke I, Saffa A, Guthartz S, Tate A, Varma JK, Vora NM, et al. Health Precautions Taken by Travelers to Countries with Ebola Virus Disease. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):929-931. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.160041
    AMA Ezeoke I, Saffa A, Guthartz S, et al. Health Precautions Taken by Travelers to Countries with Ebola Virus Disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):929-931. doi:10.3201/eid2205.160041.
    APA Ezeoke, I., Saffa, A., Guthartz, S., Tate, A., Varma, J. K., & Vora, N. M. (2016). Health Precautions Taken by Travelers to Countries with Ebola Virus Disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 929-931. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.160041.
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  • Cutaneous Leishmaniasis and Conflict in Syria PDF Version [PDF - 319 KB - 3 pages]
    W. S. Al-Salem et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Al-Salem WS, Pigott DM, Subramaniam K, Haines L, Kelly-Hope L, Molyneux DH, et al. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis and Conflict in Syria. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):931-933. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.160042
    AMA Al-Salem WS, Pigott DM, Subramaniam K, et al. Cutaneous Leishmaniasis and Conflict in Syria. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):931-933. doi:10.3201/eid2205.160042.
    APA Al-Salem, W. S., Pigott, D. M., Subramaniam, K., Haines, L., Kelly-Hope, L., Molyneux, D. H....Acosta-Serrano, A. (2016). Cutaneous Leishmaniasis and Conflict in Syria. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 931-933. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.160042.
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  • Phylogeny of Zika Virus in Western Hemisphere, 2015 PDF Version [PDF - 323 KB - 3 pages]
    R. Lanciotti et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Lanciotti R, Lambert AJ, Holodniy M, Saavedra S, Signor L. Phylogeny of Zika Virus in Western Hemisphere, 2015. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):933-935. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.160065
    AMA Lanciotti R, Lambert AJ, Holodniy M, et al. Phylogeny of Zika Virus in Western Hemisphere, 2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):933-935. doi:10.3201/eid2205.160065.
    APA Lanciotti, R., Lambert, A. J., Holodniy, M., Saavedra, S., & Signor, L. (2016). Phylogeny of Zika Virus in Western Hemisphere, 2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 933-935. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.160065.
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  • Congenital Trypanosomiasis in Child Born in France to African Mother PDF Version [PDF - 307 KB - 3 pages]
    M. De Kyvon et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID De Kyvon M, Maakaroun-Vermesse Z, Lanotte P, Priotto G, Perez-Simarro P, Guennoc A, et al. Congenital Trypanosomiasis in Child Born in France to African Mother. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):935-937. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.160133
    AMA De Kyvon M, Maakaroun-Vermesse Z, Lanotte P, et al. Congenital Trypanosomiasis in Child Born in France to African Mother. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):935-937. doi:10.3201/eid2205.160133.
    APA De Kyvon, M., Maakaroun-Vermesse, Z., Lanotte, P., Priotto, G., Perez-Simarro, P., Guennoc, A....Desoubeaux, G. (2016). Congenital Trypanosomiasis in Child Born in France to African Mother. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 935-937. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.160133.
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    J. Díaz-Quiñonez et al.
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    EID Díaz-Quiñonez J, Escobar-Escamilla N, Wong-Arámbula C, Vázquez-Pichardo M, Torres-Longoria B, López-Martínez I, et al. Asian Genotype Zika Virus Detected in Traveler Returning to Mexico from Colombia, October 2015. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):937-939. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.160190
    AMA Díaz-Quiñonez J, Escobar-Escamilla N, Wong-Arámbula C, et al. Asian Genotype Zika Virus Detected in Traveler Returning to Mexico from Colombia, October 2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):937-939. doi:10.3201/eid2205.160190.
    APA Díaz-Quiñonez, J., Escobar-Escamilla, N., Wong-Arámbula, C., Vázquez-Pichardo, M., Torres-Longoria, B., López-Martínez, I....Ramírez-González, J. (2016). Asian Genotype Zika Virus Detected in Traveler Returning to Mexico from Colombia, October 2015. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 937-939. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.160190.
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  • Technological Solutions to Address Drug-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae PDF Version [PDF - 273 KB - 2 pages]
    C. C. Bristow et al.
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    EID Bristow CC, Dong H, Klausner JD. Technological Solutions to Address Drug-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):939-940. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.160083
    AMA Bristow CC, Dong H, Klausner JD. Technological Solutions to Address Drug-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):939-940. doi:10.3201/eid2205.160083.
    APA Bristow, C. C., Dong, H., & Klausner, J. D. (2016). Technological Solutions to Address Drug-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 939-940. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.160083.
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    B. Atkinson et al.
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    EID Atkinson B, Hearn P, Afrough B, Lumley S, Carter D, Aarons EJ, et al. Detection of Zika Virus in Semen. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):940. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.160107
    AMA Atkinson B, Hearn P, Afrough B, et al. Detection of Zika Virus in Semen. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):940. doi:10.3201/eid2205.160107.
    APA Atkinson, B., Hearn, P., Afrough, B., Lumley, S., Carter, D., Aarons, E. J....Hewson, R. (2016). Detection of Zika Virus in Semen. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 940. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.160107.
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  • Inspiration and Insecticide from the Flower Garden PDF Version [PDF - 330 KB - 2 pages]
    B. Breedlove and P. M. Arguin
            Cite This Article
    EID Breedlove B, Arguin PM. Inspiration and Insecticide from the Flower Garden. Emerg Infect Dis. 2016;22(5):941-942. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.AC2205
    AMA Breedlove B, Arguin PM. Inspiration and Insecticide from the Flower Garden. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2016;22(5):941-942. doi:10.3201/eid2205.AC2205.
    APA Breedlove, B., & Arguin, P. M. (2016). Inspiration and Insecticide from the Flower Garden. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 22(5), 941-942. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2205.AC2205.
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