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Volume 22, Number 5—May 2016

Research

Projecting Month of Birth for At-Risk Infants after Zika Virus Disease Outbreaks

Jennita ReefhuisComments to Author , Suzanne M. Gilboa, Michael A. Johansson, Diana Valencia, Regina M. Simeone, Susan L. Hills, Kara Polen, Denise J. Jamieson, Lyle R. Petersen, and Margaret A. Honein
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA (J. Reefhuis, S.M. Gilboa, M.A. Johansson, D. Valencia, R.M. Simeone, K. Polen, D.J. Jamieson, M.A. Honein); Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA (S.L. Hills, L.R. Petersen)

Main Article

Figure 2

Projection of anticipated birth months after Zika virus (ZIKAV) transmission in a hypothetical country. Projected birth months for weekly pregnancy cohorts are based on 40-week pregnancies in a hypothetical country in which the highest level of ZIKAV activity was from November 2015 through mid-February 2016.

Figure 2. Projection of anticipated birth months after Zika virus transmission in a hypothetical country. Projected birth months for weekly pregnancy cohorts are based on 40-week pregnancies in a hypothetical country in which the highest level of Zika activity was from November 2015 through mid-February 2016.

Main Article

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