Skip directly to search Skip directly to A to Z list Skip directly to page options Skip directly to site content

Volume 24, Number 2—February 2018

Research

Yersinia pestis Survival and Replication in Potential Ameba Reservoir

David W. MarkmanComments to Author , Michael F. Antolin, Richard A. Bowen, William H. Wheat, Michael Woods, Mercedes Gonzalez-Juarrero, and Mary Jackson
Author affiliations: Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA (D.W. Markman, M.F. Antolin, R.A. Bowen, W.H. Wheat, M. Gonzalez-Juarrero, M. Jackson); Burrell College of Osteopathic Medicine, Las Cruces, New Mexico, USA (M. Woods)

Main Article

Figure 3

Boxplots of infection intensity across ameba species after experimental infection with Yersinia pestis. Infection intensity frequencies followed a strong negative binomial distribution. Median infection intensities: AC = 3, AL = 4, AP = 3, DD = 2, VV = 1. Red diamonds denote mean infection intensity (Table). Each ameba species had several high-intensity outliers ranging up to a maximum of 84 intracellular bacteria observed in 1 A. lenticulata ameba (note broken y-axis). AC, Acanthamoeba castella

Figure 3. Boxplots of infection intensity across ameba species after experimental infection with Yersinia pestis. Infection intensity frequencies followed a strong negative binomial distribution. Median infection intensities (horizontal lines inside boxes): AC = 3, AL = 4, AP = 3, DD = 2, VV = 1. Red diamonds denote mean infection intensity (Table). Each ameba species had several high-intensity outliers ranging up to a maximum of 84 intracellular bacteria observed in 1 A. lenticulata ameba (note broken y-axis). AC, Acanthamoeba castellanii (n = 1,441); AL, A. lenticulata (n = 1,156); AP, A. polyphaga (n = 737); DD, Dictyostelium discoideum (n = 624); VV, Vermamoeba vermiformis (n = 528).

Main Article

TOP