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Volume 20, Number 12—December 2014
Research

Geographic Divergence of Bovine and Human Shiga Toxin–Producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 Genotypes, New Zealand1

Patricia JarosComments to Author , Adrian L. Cookson, Donald M. Campbell, Gail E. Duncan, Deborah Prattley, Philip E. Carter, Thomas E. Besser, Smriti Shringi, Steve Hathaway, Jonathan C. Marshall, and Nigel P. French
Author affiliations: Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand (P. Jaros, D. Prattley, J.C. Marshall, N.P. French); AgResearch Ltd, Palmerston North (A.L. Cookson); Ministry for Primary Industries, Wellington, New Zealand (D.M. Campbell, G.E. Duncan, S. Hathaway); Institute of Environmental Science and Research Ltd, Porirua, New Zealand (P. Carter); Washington State University, Pullman, Washington, USA (T.E. Besser, S. Shringi)

Main Article

Figure 2

NeighborNet (16) trees showing population differentiation of Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 isolates from humans and cattle from different regions in the North Island (red) and the South Island (blue), New Zealand. A) Isolates from human case-patients (n = 355, 8 isolates excluded). B) Isolates from bovine meat samples (n = 233, 2 isolates excluded). C) Map of New Zealand showing different regions from which samples were collected. The distances indicate population differentiatio

Figure 2. NeighborNet (16) trees showing population differentiation of Shiga toxin–producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 isolates from humans and cattle from different regions in the North Island (red) and the South Island (blue), New Zealand. A) Isolates from human case-patients (n = 355, 8 isolates excluded). B) Isolates from bovine meat samples (n = 233, 2 isolates excluded). C) Map of New Zealand showing different regions from which samples were collected. The distances indicate population differentiation measured as pairwise FST values.

Main Article

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1Preliminary results from this study were presented at the New Zealand Veterinary Association Conference; June 16–20, 2014, Hamilton, New Zealand.

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Page updated: November 18, 2014
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