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Volume 23, Number 6—June 2017
Research

Invasive Serotype 35B Pneumococci Including an Expanding Serotype Switch Lineage, United States, 2015–2016

Sopio Chochua, Benjamin J. Metcalf, Zhongya Li, Hollis Walker, Theresa Tran, Lesley McGee, and Bernard BeallComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, USA

Main Article

Figure 1

Population snapshot of 199 serotype 35B pneumococcal isolates obtained by ongoing Active Bacterial Core surveillance, United States, 2015–2016, configured by using eBURST (21). Diameters are proportional to number of isolates. Solid lines indicate single-locus variants, and the single dashed line indicates a double-locus variant of ST558. ST, sequence type.

Figure 1. Population snapshot of 199 serotype 35B pneumococcal isolates obtained by ongoing Active Bacterial Core surveillance, United States, 2015–2016, configured by using eBURST (21). Diameters are proportional to number of isolates. Solid lines indicate single-locus variants, and the single dashed line indicates a double-locus variant of ST558. ST, sequence type.

Main Article

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Page updated: May 16, 2017
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