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Volume 14, Number 1—January 2008

Volume 14, Number 1—January 2008   PDF Version [PDF - 9.37 MB - 199 pages]

THEME ISSUE
International Polar Year

Commentary

Perspective

  • Sexual Health and Sexually Transmitted Infections in the North American Arctic PDF Version [PDF - 74 KB - 6 pages]
    D. G. Law et al.
        View Abstract

    Our objective was to describe the basic epidemiology of sexually transmitted infections for Arctic and sub-Arctic regions of North America. We summarized published and unpublished rates of chlamydial infection and gonorrhea reported from 2003 through 2006 for Alaska, Canada, and Greenland. In 2006, Alaska reported high rates of chlamydial infection (715 cases/100,000 population) compared with the United States as a whole; northern Canada reported high rates of chlamydial infection (1,693 cases/100,000) and gonorrhea (247 cases/100,000) compared with southern Canada; and Greenland consistently reported the highest rates of chlamydial infection (5,543 cases/100,000) and gonorrhea (1,738 cases/100,000) in the Arctic. Rates were high for both men and women, although the highest incidence of infection was predominantly reported for young women in their early twenties. We propose that community-based participatory research is an appropriate approach to improve sexual health in Arctic communities.

        Cite This Article
    EID Law DG, Rink E, Mulvad G, Koch A. Sexual Health and Sexually Transmitted Infections in the North American Arctic. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):4-9. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.071112
    AMA Law DG, Rink E, Mulvad G, et al. Sexual Health and Sexually Transmitted Infections in the North American Arctic. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):4-9. doi:10.3201/eid1401.071112.
    APA Law, D. G., Rink, E., Mulvad, G., & Koch, A. (2008). Sexual Health and Sexually Transmitted Infections in the North American Arctic. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 4-9. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.071112.
  • Integrated Approaches and Empirical Models for Investigation of Parasitic Diseases in Northern Wildlife PDF Version [PDF - 196 KB - 8 pages]
    E. P. Hoberg et al.
        View Abstract

    The North is a frontier for exploration of emerging infectious diseases and the large-scale drivers influencing distribution, host associations, and evolution of pathogens among persons, domestic animals, and wildlife. Leading into the International Polar Year 2007–2008, we outline approaches, protocols, and empirical models derived from a decade of integrated research on northern host–parasite systems. Investigations of emerging infectious diseases associated with parasites in northern wildlife involved a network of multidisciplinary collaborators and incorporated geographic surveys, archival collections, historical foundations for diversity, and laboratory and field studies exploring the interface for hosts, parasites, and the environment. In this system, emergence of parasitic disease was linked to geographic expansion, host switching, resurgence due to climate change, and newly recognized parasite species. Such integrative approaches serve as cornerstones for detection, prediction, and potential mitigation of emerging infectious diseases in wildlife and persons in the North and elsewhere under a changing global climate.

        Cite This Article
    EID Hoberg EP, Polley L, Jenkins EJ, Kutz SJ, Veitch AM, Elkin BT, et al. Integrated Approaches and Empirical Models for Investigation of Parasitic Diseases in Northern Wildlife. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):10-17. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.071119
    AMA Hoberg EP, Polley L, Jenkins EJ, et al. Integrated Approaches and Empirical Models for Investigation of Parasitic Diseases in Northern Wildlife. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):10-17. doi:10.3201/eid1401.071119.
    APA Hoberg, E. P., Polley, L., Jenkins, E. J., Kutz, S. J., Veitch, A. M., & Elkin, B. T. (2008). Integrated Approaches and Empirical Models for Investigation of Parasitic Diseases in Northern Wildlife. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 10-17. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.071119.
  • International Circumpolar Surveillance, An Arctic Network for the Surveillance of Infectious Diseases PDF Version [PDF - 261 KB - 7 pages]
    A. J. Parkinson et al.
        View Abstract

    Peoples of the Arctic and sub-Arctic regions live in social and physical environments that differ substantially from those of their more southern-dwelling counterparts. The cold northern climate keeps people indoors, amplifying the effects of household crowding, smoking, and inadequate ventilation on person-to-person spread of infectious disease. The emergence of antimicrobial drug resistance among bacterial pathogens, the reemergence of tuberculosis, the entrance of HIV into Arctic communities, and the specter of pandemic influenza or the sudden emergence and introduction of new viral pathogens such as severe acute respiratory syndrome are of increasing concern to residents, governments, and public health authorities. The International Circumpolar Surveillance system is a network of hospital, public health agencies, and reference laboratories throughout the Arctic linked together to collect, compare, and share uniform laboratory and epidemiologic data on infectious diseases and assist in the formulation of prevention and control strategies.

        Cite This Article
    EID Parkinson AJ, Bruce MG, Zulz T. International Circumpolar Surveillance, An Arctic Network for the Surveillance of Infectious Diseases. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):18-24. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070717
    AMA Parkinson AJ, Bruce MG, Zulz T. International Circumpolar Surveillance, An Arctic Network for the Surveillance of Infectious Diseases. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):18-24. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070717.
    APA Parkinson, A. J., Bruce, M. G., & Zulz, T. (2008). International Circumpolar Surveillance, An Arctic Network for the Surveillance of Infectious Diseases. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 18-24. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070717.

Research

  • International Circumpolar Surveillance System for Invasive Pneumococcal Disease, 1999–2005 PDF Version [PDF - 145 KB - 9 pages]
    M. G. Bruce et al.
        View Abstract

    The International Circumpolar Surveillance System is a population-based surveillance network for invasive bacterial disease in the Arctic. The 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) was introduced for routine infant vaccination in Alaska (2001), northern Canada (2002–2006), and Norway (2006). Data for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) were analyzed to identify clinical findings, disease rates, serotype distribution, and antimicrobial drug susceptibility; 11,244 IPD cases were reported. Pneumonia and bacteremia were common clinical findings. Rates of IPD among indigenous persons in Alaska and northern Canada were 43 and 38 cases per 100,000 population, respectively. Rates in children <2 years of age ranged from 21 to 153 cases per 100,000 population. In Alaska and northern Canada, IPD rates in children <2 years of age caused by PCV7 serotypes decreased by >80% after routine vaccination. IPD rates are high among indigenous persons and children in Arctic countries. After vaccine introduction, IPD caused by non-PCV7 serotypes increased in Alaska.

        Cite This Article
    EID Bruce MG, Deeks SL, Zulz T, Bruden D, Navarro C, Lovgren M, et al. International Circumpolar Surveillance System for Invasive Pneumococcal Disease, 1999–2005. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):25-33. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.071315
    AMA Bruce MG, Deeks SL, Zulz T, et al. International Circumpolar Surveillance System for Invasive Pneumococcal Disease, 1999–2005. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):25-33. doi:10.3201/eid1401.071315.
    APA Bruce, M. G., Deeks, S. L., Zulz, T., Bruden, D., Navarro, C., Lovgren, M....Parkinson, A. J. (2008). International Circumpolar Surveillance System for Invasive Pneumococcal Disease, 1999–2005. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 25-33. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.071315.
  • Invasive Bacterial Diseases in Northern Canada PDF Version [PDF - 161 KB - 7 pages]
    N. Degani et al.
        View Abstract

    International Circumpolar Surveillance (ICS) is a population-based invasive bacterial disease surveillance network. Participating Canadian regions include Yukon, Northwest Territories, Nunavut, and northern regions of Québec and Labrador (total population 132,956, 59% aboriginal). Clinical and demographic information were collected by using standardized surveillance forms. Bacterial isolates were forwarded to reference laboratories for confirmation and serotyping. After pneumococcal conjugate vaccine introduction, crude annual incidence rates of invasive Streptococcus pneumoniae decreased from 34.0/100,000 population (1999–2002) to 23.6/100,000 population (2003–2005); substantial reductions were shown among aboriginals. However, incidence rates of S. pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, and group A streptococci were higher in aboriginal populations than in non-aboriginal populations. H. influenzae type b was rare; 52% of all H. influenzae cases were caused by type a. Data collected by ICS contribute to the understanding of the epidemiology of invasive bacterial diseases among northern populations, which assists in formulation of prevention and control strategies, including immunization recommendations.

        Cite This Article
    EID Degani N, Navarro C, Deeks SL, Lovgren M. Invasive Bacterial Diseases in Northern Canada. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):34-40. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.061522
    AMA Degani N, Navarro C, Deeks SL, et al. Invasive Bacterial Diseases in Northern Canada. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):34-40. doi:10.3201/eid1401.061522.
    APA Degani, N., Navarro, C., Deeks, S. L., & Lovgren, M. (2008). Invasive Bacterial Diseases in Northern Canada. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 34-40. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.061522.
  • Sindbis Virus Infection in Resident Birds, Migratory Birds, and Humans, Finland PDF Version [PDF - 225 KB - 7 pages]
    S. Kurkela et al.
        View Abstract

    Sindbis virus (SINV), a mosquito-borne virus that causes rash and arthritis, has been causing outbreaks in humans every seventh year in northern Europe. To gain a better understanding of SINV epidemiology in Finland, we searched for SINV antibodies in 621 resident grouse, whose population declines have coincided with human SINV outbreaks, and in 836 migratory birds. We used hemagglutination-inhibition and neutralization tests for the bird samples and enzyme immunoassays and hemagglutination-inhibition for the human samples. SINV antibodies were first found in 3 birds (red-backed shrike, robin, song thrush) during their spring migration to northern Europe. Of the grouse, 27.4% were seropositive in 2003 (1 year after a human outbreak), but only 1.4% were seropositive in 2004. Among 2,529 persons, the age-standardized seroprevalence (1999–2003) was 5.2%; seroprevalence and incidence (1995–2003) were highest in North Karelia (eastern Finland). Grouse may contribute to the epidemiology of SINV in humans.

        Cite This Article
    EID Kurkela S, Rätti O, Huhtamo E, Uzcátegui NY, Nuorti JP, Laakkonen J, et al. Sindbis Virus Infection in Resident Birds, Migratory Birds, and Humans, Finland. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):41-47. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070510
    AMA Kurkela S, Rätti O, Huhtamo E, et al. Sindbis Virus Infection in Resident Birds, Migratory Birds, and Humans, Finland. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):41-47. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070510.
    APA Kurkela, S., Rätti, O., Huhtamo, E., Uzcátegui, N. Y., Nuorti, J. P., Laakkonen, J....Vapalahti, O. (2008). Sindbis Virus Infection in Resident Birds, Migratory Birds, and Humans, Finland. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 41-47. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070510.
  • Epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae Serotype a, North American Arctic, 2000–2005 PDF Version [PDF - 388 KB - 8 pages]
    M. G. Bruce et al.
        View Abstract

    Before the introduction of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccines, rates of invasive H. influenzae disease among indigenous people of the North American Arctic were among the highest in the world. Routine vaccination reduced rates to low levels; however, serotype replacement with non–type b strains may result in a reemergence of invasive disease in children. We reviewed population-based data on invasive H. influenzae in Alaska and northern Canada from 2000–2005; 138 cases were reported. Among 88 typeable isolates, 42 (48%) were H. influenzae type a (Hia); 35 (83%) occurred in indigenous peoples. Among Hia patients, median age was 1.1 years; 62% were male; 1 adult died. Common clinical manifestations included meningitis, pneumonia, and septic arthritis. Overall annual incidence was 0.9 cases per 100,000 population. Incidence among indigenous children <2 years of age in Alaska and northern Canada was 21 and 102, respectively. Serotype a is now the most common H. influenzae serotype in the North American Arctic; the highest rates are among indigenous children.

        Cite This Article
    EID Bruce MG, Deeks SL, Zulz T, Navarro C, Palacios C, Case C, et al. Epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae Serotype a, North American Arctic, 2000–2005. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):48-55. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070822
    AMA Bruce MG, Deeks SL, Zulz T, et al. Epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae Serotype a, North American Arctic, 2000–2005. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):48-55. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070822.
    APA Bruce, M. G., Deeks, S. L., Zulz, T., Navarro, C., Palacios, C., Case, C....Parkinson, A. J. (2008). Epidemiology of Haemophilus influenzae Serotype a, North American Arctic, 2000–2005. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 48-55. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070822.

Dispatches

  • Implementation and Effectiveness of Antiretroviral Therapy in Greenland PDF Version [PDF - 296 KB - 4 pages]
    N. Lohse et al.
        View Abstract

    Analyses from the Danish HIV Cohort Study showed that, despite comparable economic means and general education of healthcare personnel, antiretroviral treatment of HIV in Greenland began later and has been implemented at a slower pace with lower therapeutic effectiveness than in Denmark. However, implementation and quality of care improved considerably in recent years.

        Cite This Article
    EID Lohse N, Ladefoged K, Obel N. Implementation and Effectiveness of Antiretroviral Therapy in Greenland. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):56-59. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.071117
    AMA Lohse N, Ladefoged K, Obel N. Implementation and Effectiveness of Antiretroviral Therapy in Greenland. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):56-59. doi:10.3201/eid1401.071117.
    APA Lohse, N., Ladefoged, K., & Obel, N. (2008). Implementation and Effectiveness of Antiretroviral Therapy in Greenland. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 56-59. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.071117.
  • Dogs as Sources and Sentinels of Parasites in Humans and Wildlife, Northern Canada PDF Version [PDF - 285 KB - 4 pages]
    A. L. Salb et al.
        View Abstract

    A minimum of 11 genera of parasites, including 7 known or suspected to cause zoonoses, were detected in dogs in 2 northern Canadian communities. Dogs in remote settlements receive minimal veterinary care and may serve as sources and sentinels for parasites in persons and wildlife, and as parasite bridges between wildlife and humans.

        Cite This Article
    EID Salb AL, Barkema HW, Elkin BT, Thompson R, Whiteside DP, Black SR, et al. Dogs as Sources and Sentinels of Parasites in Humans and Wildlife, Northern Canada. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):60-63. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.071113
    AMA Salb AL, Barkema HW, Elkin BT, et al. Dogs as Sources and Sentinels of Parasites in Humans and Wildlife, Northern Canada. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):60-63. doi:10.3201/eid1401.071113.
    APA Salb, A. L., Barkema, H. W., Elkin, B. T., Thompson, R., Whiteside, D. P., Black, S. R....Kutz, S. J. (2008). Dogs as Sources and Sentinels of Parasites in Humans and Wildlife, Northern Canada. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 60-63. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.071113.
  • Human Ophthalmomyiasis Interna Caused by Hypoderma tarandi, Northern Canada PDF Version [PDF - 211 KB - 3 pages]
    P. R. Lagacé-Wiens et al.
        View Abstract

    Human myiasis caused by bot flies of nonhuman animals is rare but may be increasing. The treatment of choice is laser photocoagulation or vitrectomy with larva removal and intraocular steroids. Ophthalmomyiasis caused by Hypoderma spp. should be recognized as a potentially reversible cause of vision loss.

        Cite This Article
    EID Lagacé-Wiens PR, Dookeran R, Skinner S, Leicht R, Colwell DD, Galloway TD, et al. Human Ophthalmomyiasis Interna Caused by Hypoderma tarandi, Northern Canada. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):64-66. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070163
    AMA Lagacé-Wiens PR, Dookeran R, Skinner S, et al. Human Ophthalmomyiasis Interna Caused by Hypoderma tarandi, Northern Canada. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):64-66. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070163.
    APA Lagacé-Wiens, P. R., Dookeran, R., Skinner, S., Leicht, R., Colwell, D. D., & Galloway, T. D. (2008). Human Ophthalmomyiasis Interna Caused by Hypoderma tarandi, Northern Canada. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 64-66. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070163.
  • Q Fever Update, Maritime Canada PDF Version [PDF - 298 KB - 3 pages]
    T. J. Marrie et al.
        View Abstract

    Since the 1990s, reports of Q fever in Nova Scotia, Canada, have declined. Passive surveillance for Q fever in Nova Scotia and its neighboring provinces in eastern Canada indicates that the clinical manifestation of Q fever in the Maritime provinces is pneumonia and that incidence of the disease may fluctuate.

        Cite This Article
    EID Marrie TJ, Campbell N, McNeil SA, Webster D, Hatchette TF. Q Fever Update, Maritime Canada. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):67-69. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.071256
    AMA Marrie TJ, Campbell N, McNeil SA, et al. Q Fever Update, Maritime Canada. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):67-69. doi:10.3201/eid1401.071256.
    APA Marrie, T. J., Campbell, N., McNeil, S. A., Webster, D., & Hatchette, T. F. (2008). Q Fever Update, Maritime Canada. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 67-69. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.071256.
  • Dissemination of Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria into the Arctic PDF Version [PDF - 151 KB - 3 pages]
    M. Sjölund-Karlsson et al.
        View Abstract

    We show that Escherichia coli isolates originating from Arctic birds carry antimicrobial drug resistance determinants. This finding implies that dissemination of drug-resistant bacteria is worldwide. Resistance genes can be found even in a region where no selection pressure for resistance development exists.

        Cite This Article
    EID Sjölund-Karlsson M, Bonnedahl J, Hernandez J, Bengtsson S, Cederbrant G, Pinhassi J, et al. Dissemination of Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria into the Arctic. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):70-72. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070704
    AMA Sjölund-Karlsson M, Bonnedahl J, Hernandez J, et al. Dissemination of Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria into the Arctic. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):70-72. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070704.
    APA Sjölund-Karlsson, M., Bonnedahl, J., Hernandez, J., Bengtsson, S., Cederbrant, G., Pinhassi, J....Olsen, B. (2008). Dissemination of Multidrug-Resistant Bacteria into the Arctic. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 70-72. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070704.
  • Spatial Distribution of Echinococcus multilocularis, Svalbard, Norway PDF Version [PDF - 268 KB - 3 pages]
    E. Fuglei et al.
        View Abstract

    In Svalbard, Norway, the only intermediate host for Echinococcus multilocularis, the sibling vole, has restricted spatial distribution. A survey of feces from the main host, the arctic fox, showed that only the area occupied by the intermediate host is associated with increased risk for human infection.

        Cite This Article
    EID Fuglei E, Stien A, Yoccoz NG, Ims RA, Eide NE, Prestrud P, et al. Spatial Distribution of Echinococcus multilocularis, Svalbard, Norway. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):73-75. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070565
    AMA Fuglei E, Stien A, Yoccoz NG, et al. Spatial Distribution of Echinococcus multilocularis, Svalbard, Norway. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):73-75. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070565.
    APA Fuglei, E., Stien, A., Yoccoz, N. G., Ims, R. A., Eide, N. E., Prestrud, P....Oksanen, A. (2008). Spatial Distribution of Echinococcus multilocularis, Svalbard, Norway. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 73-75. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070565.
  • Population-based Survey of Invasive Bacterial Diseases, Greenland, 1995–2004 PDF Version [PDF - 195 KB - 4 pages]
    A. Meyer et al.
        View Abstract

    Invasive bacterial disease occurs frequently among native populations in the Arctic. Although a variety of bacteria are involved in invasive bacterial disease in Greenland, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and other staphylococci are responsible for most cases (69%); incidence varies according to region and ethnicity.

        Cite This Article
    EID Meyer A, Ladefoged K, Poulsen P, Koch A. Population-based Survey of Invasive Bacterial Diseases, Greenland, 1995–2004. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):76-79. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.071240
    AMA Meyer A, Ladefoged K, Poulsen P, et al. Population-based Survey of Invasive Bacterial Diseases, Greenland, 1995–2004. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):76-79. doi:10.3201/eid1401.071240.
    APA Meyer, A., Ladefoged, K., Poulsen, P., & Koch, A. (2008). Population-based Survey of Invasive Bacterial Diseases, Greenland, 1995–2004. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 76-79. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.071240.
  • Molecular Epidemiology of Dengue Virus Strains from Finnish Travelers PDF Version [PDF - 175 KB - 4 pages]
    E. Huhtamo et al.
        View Abstract

    We characterized 11 dengue virus (DENV) isolates obtained from Finnish travelers during 2000–2005 using monoclonal antibodies and phylogenetic analysis. The analysis of DENV isolated from travelers contributes to the global picture of strain distribution and circulation. The isolates included all serotypes, including a DENV-2 isolate from Ghana.

        Cite This Article
    EID Huhtamo E, Uzcátegui NY, Siikamäki H, Saarinen A, Piiparinen H, Vaheri A, et al. Molecular Epidemiology of Dengue Virus Strains from Finnish Travelers. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):80-83. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070865
    AMA Huhtamo E, Uzcátegui NY, Siikamäki H, et al. Molecular Epidemiology of Dengue Virus Strains from Finnish Travelers. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):80-83. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070865.
    APA Huhtamo, E., Uzcátegui, N. Y., Siikamäki, H., Saarinen, A., Piiparinen, H., Vaheri, A....Vapalahti, O. (2008). Molecular Epidemiology of Dengue Virus Strains from Finnish Travelers. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 80-83. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070865.
  • Wild Bird Influenza Survey, Canada, 2005 PDF Version [PDF - 225 KB - 4 pages]
    E. J. Parmley et al.
        View Abstract

    Of 4,268 wild ducks sampled in Canada in 2005, real-time reverse transcriptase–PCR detected influenza A matrix protein (M1) gene sequence in 37% and H5 gene sequence in 5%. Mallards accounted for 61% of samples, 73% of M1-positive ducks, and 90% of H5-positive ducks. Ducks hatched in 2005 accounted for 80% of the sample.

        Cite This Article
    EID Parmley EJ, Bastien N, Booth TF, Bowes V, Buck PA, Breault A, et al. Wild Bird Influenza Survey, Canada, 2005. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):84-87. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.061562
    AMA Parmley EJ, Bastien N, Booth TF, et al. Wild Bird Influenza Survey, Canada, 2005. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):84-87. doi:10.3201/eid1401.061562.
    APA Parmley, E. J., Bastien, N., Booth, T. F., Bowes, V., Buck, P. A., Breault, A....Leighton, F. A. (2008). Wild Bird Influenza Survey, Canada, 2005. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 84-87. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.061562.

Another Dimension

  • Aftermath PDF Version [PDF - 109 KB - 1 page]
    G. Held
            Cite This Article
    EID Held G. Aftermath. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):188. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.AD1401
    AMA Held G. Aftermath. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):188. doi:10.3201/eid1401.AD1401.
    APA Held, G. (2008). Aftermath. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 188. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.AD1401.

Volume 14, Number 1—January 2008 - Continued

Perspective

  • Influenza Virus Samples, International Law, and Global Health Diplomacy PDF Version [PDF - 184 KB - 7 pages]
    D. P. Fidler
        View Abstract

    Indonesia’s decision to withhold samples of avian influenza virus A (H5N1) from the World Health Organization for much of 2007 caused a crisis in global health. The World Health Assembly produced a resolution to try to address the crisis at its May 2007 meeting. I examine how the parties to this controversy used international law in framing and negotiating the dispute. Specifically, I analyze Indonesia’s use of the international legal principle of sovereignty and its appeal to rules on the protection of biological and genetic resources found in the Convention on Biological Diversity. In addition, I consider how the International Health Regulations 2005 applied to the controversy. The incident involving Indonesia’s actions with virus samples illustrates both the importance and the limitations of international law in global health diplomacy.

        Cite This Article
    EID Fidler DP. Influenza Virus Samples, International Law, and Global Health Diplomacy. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):88-94. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070700
    AMA Fidler DP. Influenza Virus Samples, International Law, and Global Health Diplomacy. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):88-94. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070700.
    APA Fidler, D. P. (2008). Influenza Virus Samples, International Law, and Global Health Diplomacy. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 88-94. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070700.
  • Pandemic Influenza and Pregnant Women PDF Version [PDF - 64 KB - 6 pages]
    S. A. Rasmussen et al.
        View Abstract

    Planning for a future influenza pandemic should include considerations specific to pregnant women. First, pregnant women are at increased risk for influenza-associated illness and death. The effects on the fetus of maternal influenza infection, associated fever, and agents used for prophylaxis and treatment should be taken into account. Pregnant women might be reluctant to comply with public health recommendations during a pandemic because of concerns regarding effects of vaccines or medications on the fetus. Guidelines regarding nonpharmaceutical interventions (e.g., voluntary quarantine) also might present special challenges because of conflicting recommendations about routine prenatal care and delivery. Finally, healthcare facilities need to develop plans to minimize exposure of pregnant women to ill persons, while ensuring that women receive necessary care.

        Cite This Article
    EID Rasmussen SA, Jamieson DJ, Bresee JS. Pandemic Influenza and Pregnant Women. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):95-100. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070667
    AMA Rasmussen SA, Jamieson DJ, Bresee JS. Pandemic Influenza and Pregnant Women. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):95-100. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070667.
    APA Rasmussen, S. A., Jamieson, D. J., & Bresee, J. S. (2008). Pandemic Influenza and Pregnant Women. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 95-100. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070667.

Research

  • Human Metapneumovirus Infections in Children PDF Version [PDF - 199 KB - 6 pages]
    T. Heikkinen et al.
        View Abstract

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is an important cause of lower respiratory tract infections in hospitalized children, but the age-related incidence and effect of hMPV in unselected children in the community have not been evaluated. We studied a cohort of 1,338 children <13 years of age throughout 1 respiratory season in Finland during 2000–2001. We examined children and obtained a nasal swab for viral detection at any sign of respiratory infection. hMPV was detected in 47 (3.5%) of the 1,338 children. The age-related incidence of hMPV infection was highest (7.6%) in children <2 years of age, in whom hMPV accounted for 1.7% of all infections during the season. During the epidemic peak, hMPV caused 7.1% of all respiratory infections in the cohort. Acute otitis media developed in 61% of hMPV-infected children <3 years of age. Our findings demonstrate that the effect of hMPV in the community is greatest in children <2 years of age.

        Cite This Article
    EID Heikkinen T, Österback R, Peltola V, Jartti T, Vainionpää R. Human Metapneumovirus Infections in Children. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):101-106. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070251
    AMA Heikkinen T, Österback R, Peltola V, et al. Human Metapneumovirus Infections in Children. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):101-106. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070251.
    APA Heikkinen, T., Österback, R., Peltola, V., Jartti, T., & Vainionpää, R. (2008). Human Metapneumovirus Infections in Children. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 101-106. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070251.
  • High Genetic Diversity of Measles Virus, World Health Organization European Region, 2005–2006 PDF Version [PDF - 429 KB - 8 pages]
    J. R. Kremer et al.
        View Abstract

    During 2005–2006, nine measles virus (MV) genotypes were identified throughout the World Health Organization European Region. All major epidemics were associated with genotypes D4, D6, and B3. Other genotypes (B2, D5, D8, D9, G2, and H1) were only found in limited numbers of cases after importation from other continents. The genetic diversity of endemic D6 strains was low; genotypes C2 and D7, circulating in Europe until recent years, were no longer identified. The transmission chains of several indigenous MV strains may thus have been interrupted by enhanced vaccination. However, multiple importations from Africa and Asia and virus introduction into highly mobile and unvaccinated communities caused a massive spread of D4 and B3 strains throughout much of the region. Thus, despite the reduction of endemic MV circulation, importation of MV from other continents caused prolonged circulation and large outbreaks after their introduction into unvaccinated and highly mobile communities.

        Cite This Article
    EID Kremer JR, Brown KE, Jin L, Santibanez S, Shulga SV, Aboudy Y, et al. High Genetic Diversity of Measles Virus, World Health Organization European Region, 2005–2006. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):107-114. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070778
    AMA Kremer JR, Brown KE, Jin L, et al. High Genetic Diversity of Measles Virus, World Health Organization European Region, 2005–2006. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):107-114. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070778.
    APA Kremer, J. R., Brown, K. E., Jin, L., Santibanez, S., Shulga, S. V., Aboudy, Y....Mulders, M. N. (2008). High Genetic Diversity of Measles Virus, World Health Organization European Region, 2005–2006. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 107-114. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070778.
  • Cryptosporidiosis and Filtration of Water from Loch Lomond, Scotland PDF Version [PDF - 355 KB - 6 pages]
    K. Pollock et al.
        View Abstract

    Previous evidence has suggested an association between consumption of unfiltered water from Loch Lomond, Scotland, and cryptosporidiosis. Before November 1999, this water had been only microstrained and disinfected with chlorine; however, since that time, physical treatment of the water (coagulation, rapid gravity filtration) has been added. To determine risk factors, including drinking water, for cryptosporidiosis, we analyzed data on laboratory-confirmed cases of cryptosporidiosis collected from 1997 through 2003. We identified an association between the incidence of cryptosporidiosis and unfiltered drinking water supplied to the home. The association supports the view that adding a filtration system to minimally treated water can substantially reduce the number of confirmed cryptosporidiosis cases.

        Cite This Article
    EID Pollock K, Young D, Smith HV, Ramsay CN. Cryptosporidiosis and Filtration of Water from Loch Lomond, Scotland. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):115-120. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070562
    AMA Pollock K, Young D, Smith HV, et al. Cryptosporidiosis and Filtration of Water from Loch Lomond, Scotland. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):115-120. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070562.
    APA Pollock, K., Young, D., Smith, H. V., & Ramsay, C. N. (2008). Cryptosporidiosis and Filtration of Water from Loch Lomond, Scotland. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 115-120. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070562.
  • Cross-subtype Immunity against Avian Influenza in Persons Recently Vaccinated for Influenza PDF Version [PDF - 306 KB - 8 pages]
    C. Gioia et al.
        View Abstract

    Avian influenza virus (H5N1) can be transmitted to humans, resulting in a severe or fatal disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immune cross-reactivity between human and avian influenza (H5N1) strains in healthy donors vaccinated for seasonal influenza A (H1N1)/(H3N2). A small frequency of CD4 T cells specific for subtype H5N1 was detected in several persons at baseline, and seasonal vaccine administration enhanced the frequency of such reactive CD4 T cells. We also observed that seasonal vaccination is able to raise neutralizing immunity against influenza (H5N1) in a large number of donors. No correlation between influenza-specific CD4 T cells and humoral responses was observed. N1 may possibly be a target for both cellular and humoral cross-type immunity, but additional experiments are needed to clarify this point. These findings highlight the possibility of boosting cross-type cellular and humoral immunity against highly pathogenic avian influenza A virus subtype H5N1 by seasonal influenza vaccination.

        Cite This Article
    EID Gioia C, Castilletti C, Tempestilli M, Piacentini P, Bordi L, Chiappini R, et al. Cross-subtype Immunity against Avian Influenza in Persons Recently Vaccinated for Influenza. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):121-128. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.061283
    AMA Gioia C, Castilletti C, Tempestilli M, et al. Cross-subtype Immunity against Avian Influenza in Persons Recently Vaccinated for Influenza. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):121-128. doi:10.3201/eid1401.061283.
    APA Gioia, C., Castilletti, C., Tempestilli, M., Piacentini, P., Bordi, L., Chiappini, R....Poccia, F. (2008). Cross-subtype Immunity against Avian Influenza in Persons Recently Vaccinated for Influenza. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 121-128. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.061283.
  • Telephone Survey to Assess Influenza-like Illness, United States, 2006 PDF Version [PDF - 187 KB - 7 pages]
    J. L. Malone et al.
        View Abstract

    Although current national response plans assume that most influenza-infected patients would stay home during a pandemic, surveillance systems might be overwhelmed and unable to monitor their health status. We explored the feasibility of using a nationwide telephone survey to monitor at-home patients. Of randomly selected adults surveyed during low influenza activity months (April–October 2006, surveillance weeks 17–41), 86% (7,268/8,449) agreed to answer questions about health status and influenza-like illness symptoms. Three percent (230/7,628) self-reported “flu.” A subset (0.9%, 68/230) self-reported fever. In comparison, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Sentinel Provider Network reported clinical influenza-like illness rates of 1.2%, 0.9%, and 1.2% for weeks 17, 20, and 41, respectively. The consistency between information obtained by telephone and surveillance data warrants further studies to determine whether telephone surveys can accurately monitor health status during seasonal influenza peaks and to augment current surveillance systems during a pandemic.

        Cite This Article
    EID Malone JL, Madjid M, Casscells SW. Telephone Survey to Assess Influenza-like Illness, United States, 2006. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):129-135. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070265
    AMA Malone JL, Madjid M, Casscells SW. Telephone Survey to Assess Influenza-like Illness, United States, 2006. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):129-135. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070265.
    APA Malone, J. L., Madjid, M., & Casscells, S. W. (2008). Telephone Survey to Assess Influenza-like Illness, United States, 2006. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 129-135. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070265.
  • Experimental Infection of Swans and Geese with Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1) of Asian Lineage PDF Version [PDF - 273 KB - 7 pages]
    J. D. Brown et al.
        View Abstract

    The role of wild birds in the epidemiology of the Asian lineage highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus subtype H5N1 epizootic and their contribution to the spread of the responsible viruses in Eurasia and Africa are unclear. To better understand the potential role of swans and geese in the epidemiology of this virus, we infected 4 species of swans and 2 species of geese with an HPAI virus of Asian lineage recovered from a whooper swan in Mongolia in 2005, A/whooper swan/Mongolia/244/2005 (H5N1). The highest mortality rates were observed in swans, and species-related differences in clinical illness and viral shedding were evident. These results suggest that the potential for HPAI (H5N1) viral shedding and the movement of infected birds may be species-dependent and can help explain observed deaths associated with HPAI (H5N1) infection in anseriforms in Eurasia.

        Cite This Article
    EID Brown JD, Stallknecht DE, Swayne DE. Experimental Infection of Swans and Geese with Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1) of Asian Lineage. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):136-142. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070740
    AMA Brown JD, Stallknecht DE, Swayne DE. Experimental Infection of Swans and Geese with Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1) of Asian Lineage. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):136-142. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070740.
    APA Brown, J. D., Stallknecht, D. E., & Swayne, D. E. (2008). Experimental Infection of Swans and Geese with Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1) of Asian Lineage. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 136-142. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070740.
  • Short- and Long-term Effects of Bacterial Gastrointestinal Infections PDF Version [PDF - 206 KB - 6 pages]
    A. Ternhag et al.
        View Abstract

    During 1997–2004, microbiologically confirmed gastrointestinal infections were reported for 101,855 patients in Sweden. Among patients who had Salmonella infection (n = 34,664), we found an increased risk for aortic aneurysm (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] 6.4, 95% confidence interval [CI] 3.1–11.8) within 3 months after infection and an elevated risk for ulcerative colitis (SIR 3.2, 95% CI 2.2–4.6) within 1 year after infection. We also found this elevated risk for ulcerative colitis among Campylobacter infections (n = 57,425; SIR 2.8, 95% CI 2.0–3.8). Within 1 year, we found an increased risk for reactive arthritis among patients with Yersinia enteritis (n = 5,133; SIR 47.0, 95% CI 21.5–89.2), Salmonella infection (SIR 18.2, 95% CI 12.0–26.5), and Campylobacter infection (SIR 6.3, 95% CI 3.5–10.4). Acute gastroenteritis is sometimes associated with disease manifestations from several organ systems that may require hospitalization of patients.

        Cite This Article
    EID Ternhag A, Törner A, Svensson Å, Ekdahl K, Giesecke J. Short- and Long-term Effects of Bacterial Gastrointestinal Infections. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):143-148. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070524
    AMA Ternhag A, Törner A, Svensson Å, et al. Short- and Long-term Effects of Bacterial Gastrointestinal Infections. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):143-148. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070524.
    APA Ternhag, A., Törner, A., Svensson, Å., Ekdahl, K., & Giesecke, J. (2008). Short- and Long-term Effects of Bacterial Gastrointestinal Infections. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 143-148. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070524.

Dispatches

  • Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1) Replication in Feathers of Domestic Waterfowl PDF Version [PDF - 264 KB - 3 pages]
    Y. Yamamoto et al.
        View Abstract

    We examined feathers of domestic ducks and geese inoculated with 2 different avian influenza virus (H5N1) genotypes. Together with virus isolation from the skin, the detection of viral antigens and ultrastructural observation of the virions in the feather epidermis raise the possibility of feathers as sources of infection.

        Cite This Article
    EID Yamamoto Y, Nakamura K, Okamatsu M, Yamada M, Mase M. Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1) Replication in Feathers of Domestic Waterfowl. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):149-151. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.071036
    AMA Yamamoto Y, Nakamura K, Okamatsu M, et al. Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1) Replication in Feathers of Domestic Waterfowl. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):149-151. doi:10.3201/eid1401.071036.
    APA Yamamoto, Y., Nakamura, K., Okamatsu, M., Yamada, M., & Mase, M. (2008). Avian Influenza Virus (H5N1) Replication in Feathers of Domestic Waterfowl. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 149-151. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.071036.
  • Prolonged Bartonella henselae Bacteremia Caused by Reinfection in Cats PDF Version [PDF - 179 KB - 3 pages]
    M. Arvand et al.
        View Abstract

    We analyzed the genetic relatedness of blood culture isolates of Bartonella henselae from 2 cats of patients with cat-scratch disease at admission and after 12 months. Isolates from each cat at different times were clonally unrelated, which suggested reinfection by a second strain.

        Cite This Article
    EID Arvand M, Viezens J, Berghoff J. Prolonged Bartonella henselae Bacteremia Caused by Reinfection in Cats. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):152-154. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070768
    AMA Arvand M, Viezens J, Berghoff J. Prolonged Bartonella henselae Bacteremia Caused by Reinfection in Cats. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):152-154. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070768.
    APA Arvand, M., Viezens, J., & Berghoff, J. (2008). Prolonged Bartonella henselae Bacteremia Caused by Reinfection in Cats. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 152-154. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070768.
  • Human Case of Streptococcus suis Serotype 16 Infection PDF Version [PDF - 278 KB - 3 pages]
    H. D. Nghia et al.
        View Abstract

    Streptococcus suis infection is an emerging zoonosis in Southeast Asia. We report a fatal case of S. suis serotype 16 infection in a Vietnamese man in 2001.

        Cite This Article
    EID Nghia HD, Hoa N, Linh LD, Campbell J, Diep TS, Chau NV, et al. Human Case of Streptococcus suis Serotype 16 Infection. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):155-157. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070534
    AMA Nghia HD, Hoa N, Linh LD, et al. Human Case of Streptococcus suis Serotype 16 Infection. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):155-157. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070534.
    APA Nghia, H. D., Hoa, N., Linh, L. D., Campbell, J., Diep, T. S., Chau, N. V....Schultsz, C. (2008). Human Case of Streptococcus suis Serotype 16 Infection. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 155-157. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070534.
  • Magpies as Hosts for West Nile Virus, Southern France PDF Version [PDF - 221 KB - 3 pages]
    E. Jourdain et al.
        View Abstract

    European magpies (Pica pica) from southern France were tested for antibodies to West Nile virus (WNV) and viral shedding in feces during spring–autumn 2005. Results suggest that this peridomestic species may be a suitable sentinel species and a relevant target for additional investigations on WNV ecology in Europe.

        Cite This Article
    EID Jourdain E, Gauthier-Clerc M, Sabatier P, Grège O, Greenland T, Leblond A, et al. Magpies as Hosts for West Nile Virus, Southern France. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):158-160. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070630
    AMA Jourdain E, Gauthier-Clerc M, Sabatier P, et al. Magpies as Hosts for West Nile Virus, Southern France. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):158-160. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070630.
    APA Jourdain, E., Gauthier-Clerc, M., Sabatier, P., Grège, O., Greenland, T., Leblond, A....Zeller, H. G. (2008). Magpies as Hosts for West Nile Virus, Southern France. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 158-160. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070630.
  • Emerging Angiostrongyliasis in Mainland China PDF Version [PDF - 220 KB - 4 pages]
    S. Lv et al.
        View Abstract

    Our review of angiostrongyliasis in China found that the disease is emerging as a result of changes in food consumption habits and long-distance transportation of food. Enhanced understanding of angiostrongyliasis epidemiology, increased public awareness about the risks associated with eating raw food, and enhanced food safety measures are needed.

        Cite This Article
    EID Lv S, Zhang Y, Steinmann P, Zhou X. Emerging Angiostrongyliasis in Mainland China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):161-164. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.061529
    AMA Lv S, Zhang Y, Steinmann P, et al. Emerging Angiostrongyliasis in Mainland China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):161-164. doi:10.3201/eid1401.061529.
    APA Lv, S., Zhang, Y., Steinmann, P., & Zhou, X. (2008). Emerging Angiostrongyliasis in Mainland China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 161-164. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.061529.
  • Hepatitis E in England and Wales PDF Version [PDF - 167 KB - 3 pages]
    H. C. Lewis et al.
        View Abstract

    In 2005, 329 cases of hepatitis E virus infection were confirmed in England and Wales; 33 were confirmed indigenous infections, and a further 67 were estimated to be indigenous infections. Hepatitis E should be considered in the investigation of patients with hepatitis even if they have no history of travel.

        Cite This Article
    EID Lewis HC, Boisson S, Ijaz S, Hewitt K, Ngui SL, Boxall E, et al. Hepatitis E in England and Wales. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):165-167. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070307
    AMA Lewis HC, Boisson S, Ijaz S, et al. Hepatitis E in England and Wales. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):165-167. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070307.
    APA Lewis, H. C., Boisson, S., Ijaz, S., Hewitt, K., Ngui, S. L., Boxall, E....Morgan, D. (2008). Hepatitis E in England and Wales. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 165-167. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070307.
  • Protochlamydia naegleriophila as Etiologic Agent of Pneumonia PDF Version [PDF - 371 KB - 5 pages]
    N. Casson et al.
        View Abstract

    Using ameba coculture, we grew a Naegleria endosymbiont. Phenotypic, genetic, and phylogenetic analyses supported its affiliation as Protochlamydia naegleriophila sp. nov. We then developed a specific diagnostic PCR for Protochlamydia spp. When applied to bronchoalveolar lavages, results of this PCR were positive for 1 patient with pneumonia. Further studies are needed to assess the role of Protochlamydia spp. in pneumonia.

        Cite This Article
    EID Casson N, Michel R, Müller K, Aubert JD, Greub G. Protochlamydia naegleriophila as Etiologic Agent of Pneumonia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):168-172. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070980
    AMA Casson N, Michel R, Müller K, et al. Protochlamydia naegleriophila as Etiologic Agent of Pneumonia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):168-172. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070980.
    APA Casson, N., Michel, R., Müller, K., Aubert, J. D., & Greub, G. (2008). Protochlamydia naegleriophila as Etiologic Agent of Pneumonia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 168-172. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070980.
  • Adamantane-Resistant Influenza Infection During the 2004–05 Season PDF Version [PDF - 203 KB - 4 pages]
    M. Rahman et al.
        View Abstract

    Adamantane-resistant influenza A is an emerging problem, but infections caused by resistant and susceptible viruses have not been compared. We identified adamantane resistance in 47% of 152 influenza A virus (H3N2) isolates collected during 2005. Resistant and susceptible viruses caused similar symptoms and illness duration. The prevalence of resistance was highest in children.

        Cite This Article
    EID Rahman M, Bright RA, Kieke BA, Donahue JG, Greenlee RT, Vandermause M, et al. Adamantane-Resistant Influenza Infection During the 2004–05 Season. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):173-176. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070460
    AMA Rahman M, Bright RA, Kieke BA, et al. Adamantane-Resistant Influenza Infection During the 2004–05 Season. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):173-176. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070460.
    APA Rahman, M., Bright, R. A., Kieke, B. A., Donahue, J. G., Greenlee, R. T., Vandermause, M....Belongia, E. A. (2008). Adamantane-Resistant Influenza Infection During the 2004–05 Season. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 173-176. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070460.

Letters

  • Chikungunya and Dengue Viruses in Travelers PDF Version [PDF - 126 KB - 2 pages]
    L. Nicoletti et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Nicoletti L, Ciccozzi M, Marchi A, Fioretini C, Martucci P, D’Ancona F, et al. Chikungunya and Dengue Viruses in Travelers. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):177-178. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070618
    AMA Nicoletti L, Ciccozzi M, Marchi A, et al. Chikungunya and Dengue Viruses in Travelers. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):177-178. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070618.
    APA Nicoletti, L., Ciccozzi, M., Marchi, A., Fioretini, C., Martucci, P., D’Ancona, F....Ciufolini, M. G. (2008). Chikungunya and Dengue Viruses in Travelers. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 177-178. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070618.
  • Acinetobacter spp. in Gunshot Injuries PDF Version [PDF - 165 KB - 3 pages]
    J. W. Elston et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Elston JW, Bannan CL, Chih DT, Boutlis CS. Acinetobacter spp. in Gunshot Injuries. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):178-180. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070878
    AMA Elston JW, Bannan CL, Chih DT, et al. Acinetobacter spp. in Gunshot Injuries. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):178-180. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070878.
    APA Elston, J. W., Bannan, C. L., Chih, D. T., & Boutlis, C. S. (2008). Acinetobacter spp. in Gunshot Injuries. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 178-180. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070878.
  • Case Cluster of Necrotizing Fasciitis and Cellulitis Associated with Vein Sclerotherapy PDF Version [PDF - 154 KB - 2 pages]
    H. Chan et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Chan H, Low J, Wilson L, Harris O, Cheng A, Athan E, et al. Case Cluster of Necrotizing Fasciitis and Cellulitis Associated with Vein Sclerotherapy. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):180-181. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070250
    AMA Chan H, Low J, Wilson L, et al. Case Cluster of Necrotizing Fasciitis and Cellulitis Associated with Vein Sclerotherapy. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):180-181. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070250.
    APA Chan, H., Low, J., Wilson, L., Harris, O., Cheng, A., & Athan, E. (2008). Case Cluster of Necrotizing Fasciitis and Cellulitis Associated with Vein Sclerotherapy. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 180-181. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070250.
  • Streptococcus suis in Humans, Thailand PDF Version [PDF - 143 KB - 3 pages]
    D. Takamatsu et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Takamatsu D, Wongsawan K, Osaki M, Nishino H, Ishiji T, Tharavichitkul P, et al. Streptococcus suis in Humans, Thailand. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):181-183. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070568
    AMA Takamatsu D, Wongsawan K, Osaki M, et al. Streptococcus suis in Humans, Thailand. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):181-183. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070568.
    APA Takamatsu, D., Wongsawan, K., Osaki, M., Nishino, H., Ishiji, T., Tharavichitkul, P....Sekizaki, T. (2008). Streptococcus suis in Humans, Thailand. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 181-183. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070568.
  • Streptococcus suis Meningitis, United States PDF Version [PDF - 154 KB - 3 pages]
    G. T. Lee et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Lee GT, Chiu CY, Haller BL, Denn PM, Hall CS, Gerberding JL, et al. Streptococcus suis Meningitis, United States. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):183-185. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070930
    AMA Lee GT, Chiu CY, Haller BL, et al. Streptococcus suis Meningitis, United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):183-185. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070930.
    APA Lee, G. T., Chiu, C. Y., Haller, B. L., Denn, P. M., Hall, C. S., & Gerberding, J. L. (2008). Streptococcus suis Meningitis, United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 183-185. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070930.
  • Parvoviruses in Blood Donors and Transplant Patients, Italy PDF Version [PDF - 133 KB - 3 pages]
    D. Vallerini et al.
            Cite This Article
    EID Vallerini D, Barozzi P, Quadrelli C, Bosco R, Potenza L, Riva G, et al. Parvoviruses in Blood Donors and Transplant Patients, Italy. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):185-186. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070610
    AMA Vallerini D, Barozzi P, Quadrelli C, et al. Parvoviruses in Blood Donors and Transplant Patients, Italy. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):185-186. doi:10.3201/eid1401.070610.
    APA Vallerini, D., Barozzi, P., Quadrelli, C., Bosco, R., Potenza, L., Riva, G....Luppi, M. (2008). Parvoviruses in Blood Donors and Transplant Patients, Italy. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 185-186. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.070610.
  • Antimicrobial Drug Use and Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria PDF Version [PDF - 127 KB - 2 pages]
    F. Bellissimo-Rodrigues
            Cite This Article
    EID Bellissimo-Rodrigues F. Antimicrobial Drug Use and Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):187-188. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.071028
    AMA Bellissimo-Rodrigues F. Antimicrobial Drug Use and Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):187-188. doi:10.3201/eid1401.071028.
    APA Bellissimo-Rodrigues, F. (2008). Antimicrobial Drug Use and Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 187-188. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.071028.

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  • “I Am but Mad North-northwest: When the Wind is Southerly I Know a Hawk from a Handsaw” PDF Version [PDF - 140 KB - 2 pages]
    P. Potter
            Cite This Article
    EID Potter P. “I Am but Mad North-northwest: When the Wind is Southerly I Know a Hawk from a Handsaw”. Emerg Infect Dis. 2008;14(1):189-190. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.AC1401
    AMA Potter P. “I Am but Mad North-northwest: When the Wind is Southerly I Know a Hawk from a Handsaw”. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2008;14(1):189-190. doi:10.3201/eid1401.AC1401.
    APA Potter, P. (2008). “I Am but Mad North-northwest: When the Wind is Southerly I Know a Hawk from a Handsaw”. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 14(1), 189-190. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1401.AC1401.
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