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Medscape CME Activity

Medscape, LLC is pleased to provide online continuing medical education (CME) for selected journal articles, allowing clinicians the opportunity to earn CME credit. In support of improving patient care, these activities have been planned and implemented by Medscape, LLC and Emerging Infectious Diseases. Medscape, LLC is jointly accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), to provide continuing education for the healthcare team.

CME credit is available for one year after publication.

Volume 25—2019

Volume 25, Number 2—February 2019

image of the "Thumbnail" version of the Volume 25, Number 2—February 2019 cover of the CDC"s EID journal
Medscape CME Activity
Zika Virus Epidemic in Pregnant Women, Dominican Republic, 2016–2017 PDF Version[PDF - 2.59 MB - 9 pages]
F. Peña et al.
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Zika virus infection during pregnancy may result in birth defects and pregnancy complications. We describe the Zika virus outbreak in pregnant women in the Dominican Republic during 2016–2017. We conducted multinomial logistic regression to identify factors associated with fetal losses and preterm birth. The Ministry of Health identified 1,282 pregnant women with suspected Zika virus infection, a substantial proportion during their first trimester. Fetal loss was reported for ≈10% of the reported pregnancies, and 3 cases of fetal microcephaly were reported. Women infected during the first trimester were more likely to have early fetal loss (adjusted odds ratio 5.9, 95% CI 3.5–10.0). Experiencing fever during infection was associated with increased odds of premature birth (adjusted odds ratio 1.65, 95% CI 1.03–2.65). There was widespread morbidity during the epidemic. Our findings strengthen the evidence for a broad range of adverse pregnancy outcomes resulting from Zika virus infection.

    Cite This Article
EID Peña F, Pimentel R, Khosla S, Mehta SD, Brito MO. Zika Virus Epidemic in Pregnant Women, Dominican Republic, 2016–2017. Emerg Infect Dis. 2019;25(2):247-255. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2502.181054
AMA Peña F, Pimentel R, Khosla S, et al. Zika Virus Epidemic in Pregnant Women, Dominican Republic, 2016–2017. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2019;25(2):247-255. doi:10.3201/eid2502.181054.
APA Peña, F., Pimentel, R., Khosla, S., Mehta, S. D., & Brito, M. O. (2019). Zika Virus Epidemic in Pregnant Women, Dominican Republic, 2016–2017. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 25(2), 247-255. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2502.181054.
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Medscape CME Activity
Human Pasteurellosis Health Risk for Elderly Persons Living with Companion Animals PDF Version[PDF - 1.33 MB - 7 pages]
S. Körmöndi et al.
        Cite This Article
EID Körmöndi S, Terhes G, Pál Z, Varga E, Harmati M, Buzás K, et al. Human Pasteurellosis Health Risk for Elderly Persons Living with Companion Animals. Emerg Infect Dis. 2019;25(2):229-235. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2502.180641
AMA Körmöndi S, Terhes G, Pál Z, et al. Human Pasteurellosis Health Risk for Elderly Persons Living with Companion Animals. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2019;25(2):229-235. doi:10.3201/eid2502.180641.
APA Körmöndi, S., Terhes, G., Pál, Z., Varga, E., Harmati, M., Buzás, K....Urbán, E. (2019). Human Pasteurellosis Health Risk for Elderly Persons Living with Companion Animals. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 25(2), 229-235. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2502.180641.
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Medscape CME Activity
Acute and Delayed Deaths after West Nile Virus Infection, Texas, USA, 2002–2012 PDF Version[PDF - 1.21 MB - 9 pages]
D. Philpott et al.
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Infection with West Nile virus (WNV) has a well-characterized acute disease process. However, long-term consequences are less understood. We searched death records for 4,142 residents of Texas, USA, infected with WNV during 2002–2012 and identified 557 (13%) deaths. We analyzed all-cause and cause-specific deaths after WNV infection by calculating standardized mortality ratios and using statewide mortality data. Acute-phase deaths (<90 days after symptom onset) occurred in 289 (7%) of case-patients; of those deaths, 289 (92%) were cases of West Nile neuroinvasive disease (WNND). Convalescent-phase deaths (>90 days after symptom onset) occurred in 268 (7%) of the remaining 3,853 case-patients; 210 (78%) of these deaths occurred in patients with WNND. Convalescent-phase WNND case-patients showed excess deaths from infectious and renal causes; case-patients <60 years of age had increased risk for all-cause death, specifically from renal, infectious, digestive, and circulatory causes. We provide population-level evidence of increased risk for death after WNV infection resulting in WNND.

    Cite This Article
EID Philpott D, Nolan MS, Evert N, Mayes B, Hesalroad D, Fonken E, et al. Acute and Delayed Deaths after West Nile Virus Infection, Texas, USA, 2002–2012. Emerg Infect Dis. 2019;25(2):256-264. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2502.181250
AMA Philpott D, Nolan MS, Evert N, et al. Acute and Delayed Deaths after West Nile Virus Infection, Texas, USA, 2002–2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2019;25(2):256-264. doi:10.3201/eid2502.181250.
APA Philpott, D., Nolan, M. S., Evert, N., Mayes, B., Hesalroad, D., Fonken, E....Murray, K. O. (2019). Acute and Delayed Deaths after West Nile Virus Infection, Texas, USA, 2002–2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 25(2), 256-264. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2502.181250.
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Volume 25, Number 1—January 2019

image of the "Thumbnail" version of the Volume 25, Number 1—January 2019 cover of the CDC"s EID journal
Medscape CME Activity
Prescription of Antibacterial Drugs for HIV-Exposed, Uninfected Infants, Malawi, 2004–2010
A. C. Ewing et al.
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Antimicrobial drug resistance is a serious health hazard driven by overuse. Administration of antimicrobial drugs to HIV-exposed, uninfected infants, a population that is growing and at high risk for infection, is poorly studied. We therefore analyzed factors associated with antibacterial drug administration to HIV-exposed, uninfected infants during their first year of life. Our study population was 2,152 HIV-exposed, uninfected infants enrolled in the Breastfeeding, Antiretrovirals and Nutrition study in Lilongwe, Malawi, during 2004–2010. All infants were breastfed through 28 weeks of age. Antibacterial drugs were prescribed frequently (to 80% of infants), and most (67%) of the 5,329 prescriptions were for respiratory indications. Most commonly prescribed were penicillins (43%) and sulfonamides (23%). Factors associated with lower hazard for antibacterial drug prescription included receipt of cotrimoxazole preventive therapy, receipt of antiretroviral drugs, and increased age. Thus, cotrimoxazole preventive therapy may lead to fewer prescriptions for antibacterial drugs for these infants.

    Cite This Article
EID Ewing AC, Davis NL, Kayira D, Hosseinipour MC, van der Horst C, Jamieson DJ, et al. Prescription of Antibacterial Drugs for HIV-Exposed, Uninfected Infants, Malawi, 2004–2010. Emerg Infect Dis. 2019;25(1):103-112. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2501.180782
AMA Ewing AC, Davis NL, Kayira D, et al. Prescription of Antibacterial Drugs for HIV-Exposed, Uninfected Infants, Malawi, 2004–2010. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2019;25(1):103-112. doi:10.3201/eid2501.180782.
APA Ewing, A. C., Davis, N. L., Kayira, D., Hosseinipour, M. C., van der Horst, C., Jamieson, D. J....Kourtis, A. P. (2019). Prescription of Antibacterial Drugs for HIV-Exposed, Uninfected Infants, Malawi, 2004–2010. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 25(1), 103-112. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2501.180782.
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Medscape CME Activity
Enterovirus A71 Infection and Neurologic Disease, Madrid, Spain, 2016 PDF Version[PDF - 1.02 MB - 8 pages]
C. Taravilla et al.
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We conducted an observational study from January 2016 through January 2017 of patients admitted to a reference pediatric hospital in Madrid, Spain, for neurologic symptoms and enterovirus infection. Among the 30 patients, the most common signs and symptoms were fever, lethargy, myoclonic jerks, and ataxia. Real-time PCR detected enterovirus in the cerebrospinal fluid of 8 patients, nasopharyngeal aspirate in 17, and anal swab samples of 5. The enterovirus was genotyped for 25 of 30 patients; enterovirus A71 was the most common serotype (21/25) and the only serotype detected in patients with brainstem encephalitis or encephalomyelitis. Treatment was intravenous immunoglobulins for 21 patients and corticosteroids for 17. Admission to the pediatric intensive care unit was required for 14 patients. All patients survived. At admission, among patients with the most severe disease, leukocytes were elevated. For children with brainstem encephalitis or encephalomyelitis, clinicians should look for enterovirus and not limit testing to cerebrospinal fluid.

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EID Taravilla C, Pérez-Sebastián I, Salido A, Serrano C, Extremera V, Rodríguez A, et al. Enterovirus A71 Infection and Neurologic Disease, Madrid, Spain, 2016. Emerg Infect Dis. 2019;25(1):25-32. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2501.181089
AMA Taravilla C, Pérez-Sebastián I, Salido A, et al. Enterovirus A71 Infection and Neurologic Disease, Madrid, Spain, 2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2019;25(1):25-32. doi:10.3201/eid2501.181089.
APA Taravilla, C., Pérez-Sebastián, I., Salido, A., Serrano, C., Extremera, V., Rodríguez, A....González, A. (2019). Enterovirus A71 Infection and Neurologic Disease, Madrid, Spain, 2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 25(1), 25-32. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2501.181089.
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