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Medscape CME Activity

Medscape, LLC is pleased to provide online continuing medical education (CME) for selected journal articles, allowing clinicians the opportunity to earn Medscape CME credit. Medscape, LLC is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) to provide Medscape CME for physicians. The activities listed below have been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint sponsorship of Medscape, LLC and Emerging Infectious Diseases. Medscape, LLC is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.

Volume 24—2018

Volume 24, Number 2—February 2018

image of the 'Thumbnail' version of the Volume 24, Number 2—February 2018 cover of the CDC's EID journal
Medscape CME Activity
Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae in Cryptogenic Liver Abscesses, Paris, France PDF Version [PDF - 1.24 MB - 9 pages]
B. Rossi et al.
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Europe might have an epidemic of infections with these bacteria similar to that in Asia in the early 2000s.

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Liver abscesses containing hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae have emerged during the past 2 decades, originally in Southeast Asia and then worldwide. We hypothesized that hypervirulent K. pneumoniae might also be emerging in France. In a retrospective, monocentric, cohort study, we analyzed characteristics and outcomes for 199 consecutive patients in Paris, France, with liver abscesses during 2010−2015. We focused on 31 patients with abscesses containing K. pneumoniae. This bacterium was present in most (14/27, 52%) cryptogenic liver abscesses. Cryptogenic K. pneumoniae abscesses were more frequently community-acquired (p<0.00001) and monomicrobial (p = 0.008), less likely to involve cancer patients (p<0.01), and relapsed less often (p<0.01) than did noncryptogenic K. pneumoniae liver abscesses. K. pneumoniae isolates from cryptogenic abscesses belonged to either the K1 or K2 serotypes and had more virulence factors than noncryptogenic K. pneumoniae isolates. Hypervirulent K. pneumoniae are emerging as the main pathogen isolated from cryptogenic liver abscesses in the study area.

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EID Rossi B, Gasperini M, Leflon-Guibout V, Gioanni A, de Lastours V, Rossi G, et al. Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae in Cryptogenic Liver Abscesses, Paris, France. Emerg Infect Dis. 2018;24(2):221-229. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2402.170957
AMA Rossi B, Gasperini M, Leflon-Guibout V, et al. Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae in Cryptogenic Liver Abscesses, Paris, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2018;24(2):221-229. doi:10.3201/eid2402.170957.
APA Rossi, B., Gasperini, M., Leflon-Guibout, V., Gioanni, A., de Lastours, V., Rossi, G....Lefort, A. (2018). Hypervirulent Klebsiella pneumoniae in Cryptogenic Liver Abscesses, Paris, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 24(2), 221-229. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2402.170957.
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Medscape CME Activity
Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Staphylococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome in the United Kingdom PDF Version [PDF - 763 KB - 9 pages]
H. Sharma et al.
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Nonmenstrual TSS is now more common, and better understanding will improve prevention interventions.

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Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome (TSS) was originally described in menstruating women and linked to TSS toxin 1 (TSST-1)–producing Staphylococcus aureus. Using UK national surveillance data, we ascertained clinical, molecular and superantigenic characteristics of TSS cases. Average annual TSS incidence was 0.07/100,000 population. Patients with nonmenstrual TSS were younger than those with menstrual TSS but had the same mortality rate. Children <16 years of age accounted for 39% of TSS cases, most caused by burns and skin and soft tissue infections. Nonmenstrual TSS is now more common than menstrual TSS in the UK, although both types are strongly associated with the tst+ clonal complex (CC) 30 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus lineage, which accounted for 49.4% of all TSS and produced more TSST-1 and superantigen bioactivity than did tst+ CC30 methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains. Better understanding of this MSSA lineage and infections in children could focus interventions to prevent TSS in the future.

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EID Sharma H, Smith D, Turner CE, Game L, Pichon B, Hope R, et al. Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Staphylococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome in the United Kingdom. Emerg Infect Dis. 2018;24(2):258-266. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2402.170606
AMA Sharma H, Smith D, Turner CE, et al. Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Staphylococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome in the United Kingdom. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2018;24(2):258-266. doi:10.3201/eid2402.170606.
APA Sharma, H., Smith, D., Turner, C. E., Game, L., Pichon, B., Hope, R....Sriskandan, S. (2018). Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Staphylococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome in the United Kingdom. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 24(2), 258-266. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2402.170606.
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Volume 24, Number 1—January 2018

image of the 'Thumbnail' version of the Volume 24, Number 1—January 2018 cover of the CDC's EID journal
Medscape CME Activity
Zika Virus Testing and Outcomes during Pregnancy, Florida, USA, 2016 PDF Version [PDF - 824 KB - 8 pages]
C. Shiu et al.
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Zika virus infection during pregnancy can lead to congenital Zika syndrome. Implementation of screening programs and interpretation of test results can be particularly challenging during ongoing local mosquitoborne transmission. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 2,327 pregnant women screened for Zika virus in Miami–Dade County, Florida, USA, during 2016. Of these, 86 had laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection; we describe 2 infants with probable congenital Zika syndrome. Delays in receipt of laboratory test results (median 42 days) occurred during the first month of local transmission. Odds of screening positive for Zika virus were higher for women without health insurance or who did not speak English. Our findings indicate the increase in screening for Zika virus can overwhelm hospital and public health systems, resulting in delayed receipt of results of screening and confirmatory tests and the potential to miss cases or delay diagnoses.

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EID Shiu C, Starker R, Kwal J, Bartlett M, Crane A, Greissman S, et al. Zika Virus Testing and Outcomes during Pregnancy, Florida, USA, 2016. Emerg Infect Dis. 2018;24(1):1-8. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2401.170979
AMA Shiu C, Starker R, Kwal J, et al. Zika Virus Testing and Outcomes during Pregnancy, Florida, USA, 2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2018;24(1):1-8. doi:10.3201/eid2401.170979.
APA Shiu, C., Starker, R., Kwal, J., Bartlett, M., Crane, A., Greissman, S....Curry, C. L. (2018). Zika Virus Testing and Outcomes during Pregnancy, Florida, USA, 2016. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 24(1), 1-8. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2401.170979.
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Medscape CME Activity
Recognition of Azole-Resistant Aspergillosis by Physicians Specializing in Infectious Diseases, United States PDF Version [PDF - 417 KB - 3 pages]
T. A. Walker et al.
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Of 709 physicians, 348 were familiar with azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus; of those treating case-patients, 21% lacked access to susceptibility testing.

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Infections caused by pan–azole-resistant Aspergillus fumigatus strains have emerged in Europe and recently in the United States. Physicians specializing in infectious diseases reported observing pan–azole-resistant infections and low rates of susceptibility testing, suggesting the need for wider-scale testing.

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EID Walker TA, Lockhart SR, Beekmann SE, Polgreen PM, Santibanez S, Mody RK, et al. Recognition of Azole-Resistant Aspergillosis by Physicians Specializing in Infectious Diseases, United States. Emerg Infect Dis. 2018;24(1):111-113. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2401.170971
AMA Walker TA, Lockhart SR, Beekmann SE, et al. Recognition of Azole-Resistant Aspergillosis by Physicians Specializing in Infectious Diseases, United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2018;24(1):111-113. doi:10.3201/eid2401.170971.
APA Walker, T. A., Lockhart, S. R., Beekmann, S. E., Polgreen, P. M., Santibanez, S., Mody, R. K....Jackson, B. R. (2018). Recognition of Azole-Resistant Aspergillosis by Physicians Specializing in Infectious Diseases, United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 24(1), 111-113. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid2401.170971.
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