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Conference Summaries

Volume 10—2004

Volume 10, Number 11—November 2004

image of the "Thumbnail" version of the Volume 10, Number 11—November 2004 cover of the CDC"s EID journal

Foodborne Diseases in the Global Community
E. Scallan et al.

HIV, Tuberculosis, and Malaria Antimicrobial Resistance
J. Weber and G. Cassell

New Concepts for Vaccines
T. V. Murphy et al.

New and Emerging Zoonoses
M. Pappaioanou et al.

HIV, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Tuberculosis, and Malaria: Resurgence and Response
S. Holmberg et al.

SARS, the First Pandemic of the 21st Century
J. W. LeDuc and M. Barry

Immigrant and Border Infectious Disease Concerns for Women
A. Levitt et al.

Disparities in Infectious Diseases among Women in Developing Countries
J. Rashid et al.

New Vaccines of Interest to Women
P. Fast et al.

Infectious Diseases, Preterm Delivery, and Infant Outcomes
D. Eschenbach et al.

Malaria during Pregnancy: Epidemiology, Current Prevention Strategies, and Future Directions
R. D. Newman et al.

Disparities in Infectious Diseases among Women in Developed Countries
C. Jones et al.

Stigma: Lessons from Women
W. K. Jones et al.

International Issues in Immunization
S. L. Cochi et al.

Infectious Diseases and Maternal Morbidity and Mortality
L. P. Finnegan et al.

Women and Infectious Disease—Chronic Disease Interactions
S. O'Connor et al.

Effective Communication to Prevent Infectious Disease in Women
B. Torres et al.

Vaccine Issues for Adult Women
S. Reef et al.

Globalization, Women, and Infectious Diseases
G. Kimura et al.

Infectious Diseases and Perinatal Outcomes
U. M. Reddy et al.

Using Community Health Workers to Prevent Infectious Diseases in Women
J. Rashid et al.

Infectious Diseases and Sexual Coercion
C. M. Beck-Sague et al.

Infectious Diseases in Childcare Settings
R. Cordell et al.

Group B Strep: Successful Model of "From Science to Action"
J. Cory et al.

Barriers to Infectious Disease Prevention among Women
J. Thierry et al.

Innovative Approaches to Infectious Disease Prevention in Women
M. McDonald et al.

Infectious Disease and Gender
J. H. Magnus et al.

Challenges in Healthcare Systems and Women's Caregiving Roles
R. Correa-de-Araujo et al.

Healthcare-related Infectious Diseases
N. Swanson et al.

Progress in Preventing Perinatal HIV Transmission in the United States
M. Fowler et al.

Long-term Clinical Sequelae of Sexually Transmitted Infections in Women
C. Deal et al.

International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases [PDF - 284 KB - 2 pages]
R. V. Tauxe et al.
EID Tauxe RV, Khabbaz RF, Cameron DN, Feinman L. International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004;10(11):2037-2038. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1011.040857
AMA Tauxe RV, Khabbaz RF, Cameron DN, et al. International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2004;10(11):2037-2038. doi:10.3201/eid1011.040857.
APA Tauxe, R. V., Khabbaz, R. F., Cameron, D. N., & Feinman, L. (2004). International Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 10(11), 2037-2038. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1011.040857.

National Antibiotic Resistance Monitoring System for Enteric Bacteria [PDF - 46 KB - 1 page]
C. N. Holmes and T. M. Chiller
EID Holmes CN, Chiller TM. National Antibiotic Resistance Monitoring System for Enteric Bacteria. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004;10(11):2061. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1011.040665
AMA Holmes CN, Chiller TM. National Antibiotic Resistance Monitoring System for Enteric Bacteria. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2004;10(11):2061. doi:10.3201/eid1011.040665.
APA Holmes, C. N., & Chiller, T. M. (2004). National Antibiotic Resistance Monitoring System for Enteric Bacteria. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 10(11), 2061. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1011.040665.

Barriers to Infectious Disease Care among Lesbians [PDF - 147 KB - 5 pages]
J. M. Marrazzo

Despite the considerable number of women in the United States who identify as lesbian, few data exist that address lesbians’ health needs. The Institute of Medicine emphasized that data on sexually transmitted infections, Pap smear screening, and cervical dysplasia among lesbians were needed to guide clinical practice, policy development, and patient education. Use of surveillance data for this purpose is limited because risk classifications exclude same-gender sex among women or subsume it under behaviors considered as higher risk. However, sexual transmission of human papillomavirus, HIV, Treponema pallidum, and Trichomonas vaginalis between women has been reported. Data indicate that lesbians receive routine Pap smear screening less frequently than is optimal. Moreover, lesbians commonly report previous pregnancy, induced abortion, and hormonal contraceptive use. Education of lesbians and their care providers should counter assumptions that sex between women confers no risk of transmission of sexually transmitted infections, and lesbians should receive Pap smears according to current guidelines.

EID Marrazzo JM. Barriers to Infectious Disease Care among Lesbians. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004;10(11):1974-1978. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1011.040467
AMA Marrazzo JM. Barriers to Infectious Disease Care among Lesbians. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2004;10(11):1974-1978. doi:10.3201/eid1011.040467.
APA Marrazzo, J. M. (2004). Barriers to Infectious Disease Care among Lesbians. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 10(11), 1974-1978. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1011.040467.

Contribution of Sex-linked Biology and Gender Roles to Disparities with Trachoma [PDF - 58 KB - 5 pages]
P. Courtright and S. West

Globally, trachoma is the leading infectious cause of blindness. Survey data consistently show that trachoma-related blindness is two to four times higher in women than men. Tracing the increased risk for trachoma and its consequences for women suggests that other factors besides biology may contribute. Understanding the reasons for the excess risk for and consequences of trachoma in girls and women requires examining a number of issues: Are girls and women more biologically susceptible to the consequences of infection with C. trachomatis? Could other factors help explain the excess of conjunctival scarring and trichiasis in women? Do gender roles affect the risk for trachoma and its consequences? Are women more likely to have recurrence after trichiasis surgery compared to men? This article explores the answers to these questions.

EID Courtright P, West S. Contribution of Sex-linked Biology and Gender Roles to Disparities with Trachoma. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004;10(11):2012-2016. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1011.040353
AMA Courtright P, West S. Contribution of Sex-linked Biology and Gender Roles to Disparities with Trachoma. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2004;10(11):2012-2016. doi:10.3201/eid1011.040353.
APA Courtright, P., & West, S. (2004). Contribution of Sex-linked Biology and Gender Roles to Disparities with Trachoma. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 10(11), 2012-2016. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1011.040353.

Nurses’ Working Conditions: Implications for Infectious Disease [PDF - 213 KB - 6 pages]
P. W. Stone et al.

Staffing patterns and nurses’ working conditions are risk factors for healthcare-associated infections as well as occupational injuries and infections. Staffing shortages, especially of nurses, have been identified as one of the major factors expected to constrain hospitals’ ability to deal with future outbreaks of emerging infections. These problems are compounded by a global nursing shortage. Understanding and improving nurses’ working conditions can potentially decrease the incidence of many infectious diseases. Relevant research is reviewed, and policy options are discussed.

EID Stone PW, Clarke S, Cimiotti J, Correa-de-Araujo R. Nurses’ Working Conditions: Implications for Infectious Disease. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004;10(11):1984-1989. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1011.040253
AMA Stone PW, Clarke S, Cimiotti J, et al. Nurses’ Working Conditions: Implications for Infectious Disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2004;10(11):1984-1989. doi:10.3201/eid1011.040253.
APA Stone, P. W., Clarke, S., Cimiotti, J., & Correa-de-Araujo, R. (2004). Nurses’ Working Conditions: Implications for Infectious Disease. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 10(11), 1984-1989. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1011.040253.

Volume 10, Number 9—September 2004

image of the "Thumbnail" version of the Volume 10, Number 9—September 2004 cover of the CDC"s EID journal

Transnational Issues in Quarantine [PDF - 15 KB - 1 page]
C. DiGiovanni et al.
EID DiGiovanni C, Conley J, Hamon D, Pimsler M. Transnational Issues in Quarantine. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004;10(9):1707. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1009.040281
AMA DiGiovanni C, Conley J, Hamon D, et al. Transnational Issues in Quarantine. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2004;10(9):1707. doi:10.3201/eid1009.040281.
APA DiGiovanni, C., Conley, J., Hamon, D., & Pimsler, M. (2004). Transnational Issues in Quarantine. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 10(9), 1707. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1009.040281.

Volume 10, Number 8—August 2004

Volume 10, Number 7—July 2004

image of the "Thumbnail" version of the Volume 10, Number 7—July 2004 cover of the CDC"s EID journal

Emerging Infections: What Have We Learned from SARS? [PDF - 22 KB - 2 pages]
A. P. Galvani
EID Galvani AP. Emerging Infections: What Have We Learned from SARS?. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004;10(7):1351-1352. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1007.040166
AMA Galvani AP. Emerging Infections: What Have We Learned from SARS?. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2004;10(7):1351-1352. doi:10.3201/eid1007.040166.
APA Galvani, A. P. (2004). Emerging Infections: What Have We Learned from SARS?. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 10(7), 1351-1352. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1007.040166.

Open Access Publishing [PDF - 23 KB - 2 pages]
J. A. Rankin and S. G. Franklin
EID Rankin JA, Franklin SG. Open Access Publishing. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004;10(7):1352-1353. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1007.040122
AMA Rankin JA, Franklin SG. Open Access Publishing. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2004;10(7):1352-1353. doi:10.3201/eid1007.040122.
APA Rankin, J. A., & Franklin, S. G. (2004). Open Access Publishing. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 10(7), 1352-1353. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1007.040122.

Volume 10, Number 2—February 2004

image of the "Thumbnail" version of the Volume 10, Number 2—February 2004 cover of the CDC"s EID journal

SARS Preparedness and Response Planning [PDF - 578 KB - 2 pages]
U. D. Parashar and L. J. Anderson
EID Parashar UD, Anderson LJ. SARS Preparedness and Response Planning. Emerg Infect Dis. 2004;10(2):384-385. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1002.030803
AMA Parashar UD, Anderson LJ. SARS Preparedness and Response Planning. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2004;10(2):384-385. doi:10.3201/eid1002.030803.
APA Parashar, U. D., & Anderson, L. J. (2004). SARS Preparedness and Response Planning. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 10(2), 384-385. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1002.030803.
Page created: 1/27/2011
Page updated: 4/18/2012
The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.
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