Skip directly to site content Skip directly to page options Skip directly to A-Z link Skip directly to A-Z link Skip directly to A-Z link
Issue Cover for Volume 18, Number 9—September 2012

Volume 18, Number 9—September 2012

[PDF - 17.05 MB - 163 pages]

Perspective

Hepatitis E, a Vaccine-Preventable Cause of Maternal Deaths [PDF - 202 KB - 4 pages]
A. B. Labrique et al.

Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a major cause of illness and of death in the developing world and disproportionate cause of deaths among pregnant women. Although HEV vaccine trials, including trials conducted in populations in southern Asia, have shown candidate vaccines to be effective and well-tolerated, these vaccines have not yet been produced or made available to susceptible populations. Surveillance data collected during 2001–2007 from >110,000 pregnancies in a population of ≈650,000 women in rural Bangladesh suggest that acute hepatitis, most of it likely hepatitis E, is responsible for ≈9.8% of pregnancy-associated deaths. If these numbers are representative of southern Asia, as many as 10,500 maternal deaths each year in this region alone may be attributable to hepatitis E and could be prevented by using existing vaccines.

EID Labrique AB, Sikder SS, Krain LJ, West KP, Christian P, Rashid M, et al. Hepatitis E, a Vaccine-Preventable Cause of Maternal Deaths. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1401-1404. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120241
AMA Labrique AB, Sikder SS, Krain LJ, et al. Hepatitis E, a Vaccine-Preventable Cause of Maternal Deaths. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1401-1404. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120241.
APA Labrique, A. B., Sikder, S. S., Krain, L. J., West, K. P., Christian, P., Rashid, M....Nelson, K. E. (2012). Hepatitis E, a Vaccine-Preventable Cause of Maternal Deaths. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1401-1404. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120241.
Research

Medscape CME Activity
Effectiveness and Timing of Vaccination during School Measles Outbreak [PDF - 458 KB - 9 pages]
A. Marinović et al.

Despite high vaccination coverage in most European countries, large community outbreaks of measles do occur, normally clustered around schools and resulting from suboptimal vaccination coverage. To determine whether or when it is worth implementing outbreak-response vaccination campaigns in schools, we used stochastic outbreak models to reproduce a public school outbreak in Germany, where no vaccination campaign was implemented. We assumed 2 scenarios covering the baseline vaccination ratio range (91.3%–94.3%) estimated for that school and computed outbreaks assuming various vaccination delays. In one scenario, reacting (i.e., implementing outbreak-response vaccination campaigns) within 12–24 days avoided large outbreaks and reacting within 50 days reduced outbreak size. In the other scenario, reacting within 6–14 days avoided large outbreaks and reacting within 40 days reduced the outbreak size. These are realistic time frames for implementing school outbreak response vaccination campaigns. High baseline vaccination ratios extended the time needed for effective response.

EID Marinović A, Swaan C, Wichmann O, van Steenbergen J, Kretzschmar M. Effectiveness and Timing of Vaccination during School Measles Outbreak. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1405-1413. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111578
AMA Marinović A, Swaan C, Wichmann O, et al. Effectiveness and Timing of Vaccination during School Measles Outbreak. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1405-1413. doi:10.3201/eid1809.111578.
APA Marinović, A., Swaan, C., Wichmann, O., van Steenbergen, J., & Kretzschmar, M. (2012). Effectiveness and Timing of Vaccination during School Measles Outbreak. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1405-1413. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111578.

Medscape CME Activity
Evaluation of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approaches for Suspected Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Infection, 2009–2010 [PDF - 335 KB - 8 pages]
V. Vijayan et al.

To assess adherence to real-time changes in guidelines for influenza diagnosis and use of oseltamivir during the 2009 influenza A(H1N1) pandemic, we reviewed medical records of patients with confirmed or suspected influenza-like illness (ILI) and those with no viral testing in a large Los Angeles (California, USA) hospital. Of 882 tested patients, 178 had results positive for influenza; 136 of the remaining patients received oseltamivir despite negative or no results. Oseltamivir use was consistent with national recommendations in >90%. Of inpatients, children were less likely than adults to have ILI at testing and to receive oseltamivir if ILI was found. Of outpatients, children were more likely to have positive test results; 20% tested did not have ILI or other influenza signs and symptoms. Twenty-five of 96 test-positive patients and 13 of 19 with lower respiratory tract disease were, inappropriately, not treated. Variations between practice and national recommendations could inform clinical education in future influenza seasons.

EID Vijayan V, Jing J, Zangwill KM. Evaluation of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approaches for Suspected Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Infection, 2009–2010. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1414-1421. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111564
AMA Vijayan V, Jing J, Zangwill KM. Evaluation of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approaches for Suspected Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Infection, 2009–2010. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1414-1421. doi:10.3201/eid1809.111564.
APA Vijayan, V., Jing, J., & Zangwill, K. M. (2012). Evaluation of Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approaches for Suspected Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Infection, 2009–2010. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1414-1421. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111564.

Evaluation of Immigrant Tuberculosis Screening in Industrialized Countries [PDF - 197 KB - 8 pages]
M. Pareek et al.

In industrialized countries, tuberculosis (TB) cases are concentrated among immigrants and driven by reactivation of imported latent TB infection (LTBI). We examined mechanisms used to screen immigrants for TB and LTBI by sending an anonymous, 18-point questionnaire to 31 member countries of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Twenty-nine (93.5%) of 31 responded; 25 (86.2%) screened immigrants for active TB. Fewer countries (16/29, 55.2%) screened for LTBI. Marked variations were observed in targeted populations for age (range <5 years of age to all age groups) and TB incidence in countries of origin of immigrants (>20 cases/100,000 population to >500 cases/100,000). LTBI screening was conducted in 11/16 countries by using the tuberculin skin test. Six countries used interferon-γ release assays, primarily to confirm positive tuberculin skin test results. Industrialized countries performed LTBI screening infrequently and policies varied widely. There is an urgent need to define the cost-effectiveness of LTBI screening strategies for immigrants.

EID Pareek M, Baussano I, Abubakar I, Dye C, Lalvani A. Evaluation of Immigrant Tuberculosis Screening in Industrialized Countries. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1422-1429. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120128
AMA Pareek M, Baussano I, Abubakar I, et al. Evaluation of Immigrant Tuberculosis Screening in Industrialized Countries. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1422-1429. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120128.
APA Pareek, M., Baussano, I., Abubakar, I., Dye, C., & Lalvani, A. (2012). Evaluation of Immigrant Tuberculosis Screening in Industrialized Countries. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1422-1429. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120128.

Trends in Meningococcal Disease in the United States Military, 1971–2010 [PDF - 339 KB - 8 pages]
M. P. Broderick et al.

Meningococci have historically caused extensive illness among members of the United States military. Three successive meningococcal vaccine types were used from 1971 through 2010; overall disease incidence dropped by >90% during this period. During 2006–2010, disease incidence of 0.38 (cases per 100,000 person-years) among members of the US military was not significantly different from the incidence of 0.26 among the age-matched US general population. Of the 26 cases in the US military, 5 were fatal, 15 were vaccine failures (e.g., illness in a person who had been vaccinated), and 9 were caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup Y. Incidences among 17- to 19-year-old basic trainees and among US Marines were significantly higher than among comparison military populations (p<0.05). No apparent change in epidemiology of meningococcal disease was observed after replacement of quadrivalent polysaccharide vaccine with conjugate vaccine in 2007. The data demonstrate that vaccination with meningococcal vaccine is effective.

EID Broderick MP, Faix DJ, Hansen CJ, Blair PJ. Trends in Meningococcal Disease in the United States Military, 1971–2010. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1430-1437. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120257
AMA Broderick MP, Faix DJ, Hansen CJ, et al. Trends in Meningococcal Disease in the United States Military, 1971–2010. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1430-1437. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120257.
APA Broderick, M. P., Faix, D. J., Hansen, C. J., & Blair, P. J. (2012). Trends in Meningococcal Disease in the United States Military, 1971–2010. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1430-1437. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120257.

Prevention and Control of Fish-borne Zoonotic Trematodes in Fish Nurseries, Vietnam [PDF - 347 KB - 8 pages]
J. Clausen et al.

Worldwide, >18 million persons were infected with fish-borne zoonotic trematodes in 2002. To evaluate the effectiveness of interventions for reducing prevalence and intensity of fish-borne zoonotic trematode infections in juvenile fish, we compared transmission rates at nurseries in the Red River Delta, northern Vietnam. Rates were significantly lower for nurseries that reduced snail populations and trematode egg contamination in ponds than for nurseries that did not. These interventions can be used in the development of programs for sustained control of zoonotic trematodes in farmed fish.

EID Clausen J, Madsen H, Murrell K, Van P, Thu H, Do D, et al. Prevention and Control of Fish-borne Zoonotic Trematodes in Fish Nurseries, Vietnam. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1438-1445. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111076
AMA Clausen J, Madsen H, Murrell K, et al. Prevention and Control of Fish-borne Zoonotic Trematodes in Fish Nurseries, Vietnam. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1438-1445. doi:10.3201/eid1809.111076.
APA Clausen, J., Madsen, H., Murrell, K., Van, P., Thu, H., Do, D....Dalsgaard, A. (2012). Prevention and Control of Fish-borne Zoonotic Trematodes in Fish Nurseries, Vietnam. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1438-1445. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111076.

Surveillance for Influenza Viruses in Poultry and Swine, West Africa, 2006–2008 [PDF - 258 KB - 7 pages]
E. Couacy-Hymann et al.

To determine the extent of animal influenza virus circulation in Côte d’Ivoire, Benin, and Togo, we initiated systematic year-round active influenza surveillance in backyard birds (predominantly chickens, guinea fowl, and ducks) and pigs. A total of 26,746 swab specimens were screened by using reverse transcription PCR. Animal influenza prevalence was estimated at 0 (95% CIs for each of the 2 study years 0–0.04% to 0–1.48% [birds] and 0–0.28% to 0–5% [pigs]). In addition, 2,276 serum samples from the same populations were negative for influenza-specific antibodies. These data indicate that the environments and host populations previously identified as harboring high levels of influenza virus in Southeast Asia do not do so in these 3 countries. The combination of climate and animal density factors might be responsible for what appears to be the absence of influenza virus in the backyard sector of the 3 countries.

EID Couacy-Hymann E, Kouakou VA, Aplogan GL, Awoume F, Kouakou CK, Kakpo L, et al. Surveillance for Influenza Viruses in Poultry and Swine, West Africa, 2006–2008. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1446-1452. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111296
AMA Couacy-Hymann E, Kouakou VA, Aplogan GL, et al. Surveillance for Influenza Viruses in Poultry and Swine, West Africa, 2006–2008. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1446-1452. doi:10.3201/eid1809.111296.
APA Couacy-Hymann, E., Kouakou, V. A., Aplogan, G. L., Awoume, F., Kouakou, C. K., Kakpo, L....Ducatez, M. F. (2012). Surveillance for Influenza Viruses in Poultry and Swine, West Africa, 2006–2008. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1446-1452. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111296.
Policy Review

Medscape CME Activity
Control of Fluoroquinolone Resistance through Successful Regulation, Australia [PDF - 230 KB - 8 pages]
A. C. Cheng et al.

Fluoroquinolone antimicrobial drugs are highly bioavailable, broad-spectrum agents with activity against gram-negative pathogens, especially those resistant to other classes of antimicrobial drugs. Australia has restricted the use of quinolones in humans through its national pharmaceutical subsidy scheme; and, through regulation, has not permitted the use of quinolones in food-producing animals. As a consequence, resistance to fluoroquinolones in the community has been slow to emerge and has remained at low levels in key pathogens, such as Escherichia coli. In contrast to policies in most other countries, this policy has successfully preserved the utility of this class of antimicrobial drugs for treatment of most infections.

EID Cheng AC, Turnidge J, Collignon P, Looke D, Barton M, Gottlieb T. Control of Fluoroquinolone Resistance through Successful Regulation, Australia. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1453-1460. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111515
AMA Cheng AC, Turnidge J, Collignon P, et al. Control of Fluoroquinolone Resistance through Successful Regulation, Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1453-1460. doi:10.3201/eid1809.111515.
APA Cheng, A. C., Turnidge, J., Collignon, P., Looke, D., Barton, M., & Gottlieb, T. (2012). Control of Fluoroquinolone Resistance through Successful Regulation, Australia. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1453-1460. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111515.
Dispatches

Multiple Synchronous Outbreaks of Puumala Virus, Germany, 2010 [PDF - 289 KB - 4 pages]
J. Ettinger et al.

To investigate 2,017 cases of hantavirus disease in Germany, we compared 38 new patient-derived Puumala virus RNA sequences identified in 2010 with bank vole–derived small segment RNA sequences. The epidemic process was driven by outbreaks of 6 Puumala virus clades comprising strains of human and vole origin. Each clade corresponded to a different outbreak region.

EID Ettinger J, Hofmann J, Enders M, Tewald F, Oehme RM, Rosenfeld UM, et al. Multiple Synchronous Outbreaks of Puumala Virus, Germany, 2010. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1461-1464. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111447
AMA Ettinger J, Hofmann J, Enders M, et al. Multiple Synchronous Outbreaks of Puumala Virus, Germany, 2010. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1461-1464. doi:10.3201/eid1809.111447.
APA Ettinger, J., Hofmann, J., Enders, M., Tewald, F., Oehme, R. M., Rosenfeld, U. M....Kruger, D. H. (2012). Multiple Synchronous Outbreaks of Puumala Virus, Germany, 2010. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1461-1464. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111447.

MRSA Harboring mecA Variant Gene mecC, France [PDF - 286 KB - 3 pages]
F. Laurent et al.

We describe human cases and clustered animal cases of mecALGA251–positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in France. Our report confirms that this new variant has a large distribution in Europe. It may represent a public health threat because phenotypic and genotypic tests seem unable to detect this new resistance mechanism.

EID Laurent F, Chardon H, Haenni M, Bes M, Reverdy M, Madec J, et al. MRSA Harboring mecA Variant Gene mecC, France. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1465-1467. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111920
AMA Laurent F, Chardon H, Haenni M, et al. MRSA Harboring mecA Variant Gene mecC, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1465-1467. doi:10.3201/eid1809.111920.
APA Laurent, F., Chardon, H., Haenni, M., Bes, M., Reverdy, M., Madec, J....Tristan, A. (2012). MRSA Harboring mecA Variant Gene mecC, France. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1465-1467. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111920.

Prevalence of Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection among Youth, Sweden [PDF - 181 KB - 4 pages]
J. Du et al.

Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical, head, and neck cancers. We studied 483 patients at a youth clinic in Stockholm, Sweden, and found oral HPV prevalence was 9.3% and significantly higher for female youth with than without cervical HPV infection (p = 0.043). Most oral HPV types matched the co-occurring cervical types.

EID Du J, Nordfors C, Ährlund-Richter A, Sobkowiak M, Romanitan M, Näsman A, et al. Prevalence of Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection among Youth, Sweden. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1468-1471. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111731
AMA Du J, Nordfors C, Ährlund-Richter A, et al. Prevalence of Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection among Youth, Sweden. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1468-1471. doi:10.3201/eid1809.111731.
APA Du, J., Nordfors, C., Ährlund-Richter, A., Sobkowiak, M., Romanitan, M., Näsman, A....Dalianis, T. (2012). Prevalence of Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection among Youth, Sweden. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1468-1471. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111731.

Demographic Shift of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 during and after Pandemic, Rural India [PDF - 242 KB - 4 pages]
S. Broor et al.

Population-based active surveillance in India showed higher incidence rates for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 among children during pandemic versus postpandemic periods (345 vs. 199/1,000 person-years), whereas adults had higher rates during postpandemic versus pandemic periods (131 vs. 69/1,000 person-years). Demographic shifts as pandemics evolve should be considered in public health response planning.

EID Broor S, Sullender W, Fowler K, Gupta V, Widdowson M, Krishnan A, et al. Demographic Shift of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 during and after Pandemic, Rural India. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1472-1475. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111847
AMA Broor S, Sullender W, Fowler K, et al. Demographic Shift of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 during and after Pandemic, Rural India. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1472-1475. doi:10.3201/eid1809.111847.
APA Broor, S., Sullender, W., Fowler, K., Gupta, V., Widdowson, M., Krishnan, A....Lal, R. B. (2012). Demographic Shift of Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 during and after Pandemic, Rural India. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1472-1475. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111847.

Hospitalizations Associated with Disseminated Coccidioidomycosis, Arizona and California, USA [PDF - 253 KB - 4 pages]
A. E. Seitz et al.

We analyzed hospitalization databases from Arizona and California for disseminated coccidioidomycosis–associated hospitalizations among immunocompetent persons. Racial/ethnic disease ratios were characterized by a higher incidence of hospitalization among blacks compared with other groups. This finding suggests that HIV infection, AIDS, and primary immune conditions are not a major factor in this disparity.

EID Seitz AE, Prevots D, Holland SM. Hospitalizations Associated with Disseminated Coccidioidomycosis, Arizona and California, USA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1476-1479. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120151
AMA Seitz AE, Prevots D, Holland SM. Hospitalizations Associated with Disseminated Coccidioidomycosis, Arizona and California, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1476-1479. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120151.
APA Seitz, A. E., Prevots, D., & Holland, S. M. (2012). Hospitalizations Associated with Disseminated Coccidioidomycosis, Arizona and California, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1476-1479. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120151.

Reemerging Sudan Ebola Virus Disease in Uganda, 2011 [PDF - 392 KB - 4 pages]
T. Shoemaker et al.

Two large outbreaks of Ebola hemorrhagic fever occurred in Uganda in 2000 and 2007. In May 2011, we identified a single case of Sudan Ebola virus disease in Luwero District. The establishment of a permanent in-country laboratory and cooperation between international public health entities facilitated rapid outbreak response and control activities.

EID Shoemaker T, MacNeil A, Balinandi S, Campbell S, Wamala J, McMullan LK, et al. Reemerging Sudan Ebola Virus Disease in Uganda, 2011. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1480-1483. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111536
AMA Shoemaker T, MacNeil A, Balinandi S, et al. Reemerging Sudan Ebola Virus Disease in Uganda, 2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1480-1483. doi:10.3201/eid1809.111536.
APA Shoemaker, T., MacNeil, A., Balinandi, S., Campbell, S., Wamala, J., McMullan, L. K....Nichol, S. T. (2012). Reemerging Sudan Ebola Virus Disease in Uganda, 2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1480-1483. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111536.

Francisella tularensis Subspecies holarctica, Tasmania, Australia, 2011 [PDF - 256 KB - 3 pages]
J. Jackson et al.

We report a case of ulceroglandular tularemia that developed in a woman after she was bitten by a ringtail possum (Pseudocheirus peregrinus) in a forest in Tasmania, Australia. Francisella tularensis subspecies holarctica was identified. This case indicates the emergence of F. tularensis type B in the Southern Hemisphere.

EID Jackson J, McGregor A, Cooley L, Ng J, Brown M, Ong C, et al. Francisella tularensis Subspecies holarctica, Tasmania, Australia, 2011. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1484-1486. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111856
AMA Jackson J, McGregor A, Cooley L, et al. Francisella tularensis Subspecies holarctica, Tasmania, Australia, 2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1484-1486. doi:10.3201/eid1809.111856.
APA Jackson, J., McGregor, A., Cooley, L., Ng, J., Brown, M., Ong, C....Sintchenko, V. (2012). Francisella tularensis Subspecies holarctica, Tasmania, Australia, 2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1484-1486. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111856.

Lack of Evidence for Chloroquine-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum Malaria, Leogane, Haiti [PDF - 163 KB - 3 pages]
A. Neuberger et al.

Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Haiti is considered chloroquine susceptible, although resistance transporter alleles associated with chloroquine resistance were recently detected. Among 49 patients with falciparum malaria, we found neither parasites carrying haplotypes associated with chloroquine resistance nor instances of chloroquine treatment failure. Continued vigilance to detect emergence of chloroquine resistance is needed.

EID Neuberger A, Zhong K, Kain K, Schwartz E. Lack of Evidence for Chloroquine-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum Malaria, Leogane, Haiti. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1487-1489. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120605
AMA Neuberger A, Zhong K, Kain K, et al. Lack of Evidence for Chloroquine-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum Malaria, Leogane, Haiti. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1487-1489. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120605.
APA Neuberger, A., Zhong, K., Kain, K., & Schwartz, E. (2012). Lack of Evidence for Chloroquine-Resistant Plasmodium falciparum Malaria, Leogane, Haiti. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1487-1489. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120605.

Infectious Diseases in Children and Body Mass Index in Young Adults [PDF - 244 KB - 3 pages]
G. Suh et al.

In a cohort of 1,863 Filipinos, diarrhea, fever, and unsanitary conditions in infancy were associated with a decreased body mass index in adulthood; upper respiratory tract infection was associated with an increased body mass index. These finding support the hypothesis that infections early in life play a role in body habitus in adulthood.

EID Suh G, Ley C, Parsonnet J. Infectious Diseases in Children and Body Mass Index in Young Adults. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1490-1492. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111821
AMA Suh G, Ley C, Parsonnet J. Infectious Diseases in Children and Body Mass Index in Young Adults. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1490-1492. doi:10.3201/eid1809.111821.
APA Suh, G., Ley, C., & Parsonnet, J. (2012). Infectious Diseases in Children and Body Mass Index in Young Adults. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1490-1492. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111821.

Inadequate Antibody Response to Rabies Vaccine in Immunocompromised Patient [PDF - 208 KB - 3 pages]
E. Kopel et al.

We describe an inadequate antibody response to rabies vaccine in an immunocompromised patient. A literature search revealed 15 additional immunocompromised patients, of whom 7 did not exhibit the minimum acceptable level of antibodies after a complete postexposure prophylaxis regimen. An international rabies registry is needed to provide a basis for determining appropriate vaccination protocols.

EID Kopel E, Oren G, Sidi Y, David D. Inadequate Antibody Response to Rabies Vaccine in Immunocompromised Patient. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1493-1495. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111833
AMA Kopel E, Oren G, Sidi Y, et al. Inadequate Antibody Response to Rabies Vaccine in Immunocompromised Patient. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1493-1495. doi:10.3201/eid1809.111833.
APA Kopel, E., Oren, G., Sidi, Y., & David, D. (2012). Inadequate Antibody Response to Rabies Vaccine in Immunocompromised Patient. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1493-1495. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111833.

Yersinia enterocolitica Outbreak Associated with Ready-to-Eat Salad Mix, Norway, 2011 [PDF - 325 KB - 4 pages]
E. MacDonald et al.

In 2011, an outbreak of illness caused by Yersinia enterocolitica O:9 in Norway was linked to ready-to-eat salad mix, an unusual vehicle for this pathogen. The outbreak illustrates the need to characterize isolates of this organism, and reinforces the need for international traceback mechanisms for fresh produce.

EID MacDonald E, Heier B, Nygård K, Stalheim T, Cudjoe KS, Skjerdal T, et al. Yersinia enterocolitica Outbreak Associated with Ready-to-Eat Salad Mix, Norway, 2011. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1496-1499. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120087
AMA MacDonald E, Heier B, Nygård K, et al. Yersinia enterocolitica Outbreak Associated with Ready-to-Eat Salad Mix, Norway, 2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1496-1499. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120087.
APA MacDonald, E., Heier, B., Nygård, K., Stalheim, T., Cudjoe, K. S., Skjerdal, T....Vold, L. (2012). Yersinia enterocolitica Outbreak Associated with Ready-to-Eat Salad Mix, Norway, 2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1496-1499. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120087.

Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus Virophage Seroconversion in Travelers Returning from Laos [PDF - 189 KB - 3 pages]
P. Parola et al.

During January 2010, a husband and wife returned from Laos to France with probable parasitic disease. Increased antibodies against an Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus virophage indicated seroconversion. While in Laos, they had eaten raw fish, a potential source of the virophage. This virophage, associated with giant viruses suspected to cause pneumonia, could be an emerging pathogen.

EID Parola P, Renvoisé A, Botelho-Nevers E, La Scola B, Desnues C, Raoult D. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus Virophage Seroconversion in Travelers Returning from Laos. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1500-1502. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120099
AMA Parola P, Renvoisé A, Botelho-Nevers E, et al. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus Virophage Seroconversion in Travelers Returning from Laos. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1500-1502. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120099.
APA Parola, P., Renvoisé, A., Botelho-Nevers, E., La Scola, B., Desnues, C., & Raoult, D. (2012). Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus Virophage Seroconversion in Travelers Returning from Laos. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1500-1502. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120099.

Rapid Detection of Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae [PDF - 571 KB - 5 pages]
P. Nordmann et al.

To rapidly identify carbapenemase producers in Enterobacteriaceae, we developed the Carba NP test. The test uses isolated bacterial colonies and is based on in vitro hydrolysis of a carbapenem, imipenem. It was 100% sensitive and specific compared with molecular-based techniques. This rapid (<2 hours), inexpensive technique may be implemented in any laboratory.

EID Nordmann P, Poirel L, Dortet L. Rapid Detection of Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1503-1507. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120355
AMA Nordmann P, Poirel L, Dortet L. Rapid Detection of Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1503-1507. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120355.
APA Nordmann, P., Poirel, L., & Dortet, L. (2012). Rapid Detection of Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1503-1507. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120355.

Multiple-Insecticide Resistance in Anopheles gambiae Mosquitoes, Southern Côte d’Ivoire [PDF - 245 KB - 4 pages]
C. Edi et al.

Malaria control depends on mosquito susceptibility to insecticides. We tested Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes from Côte d’Ivoire for resistance and screened a subset for target site mutations. Mosquitoes were resistant to insecticides of all approved classes. Such complete resistance, which includes exceptionally strong phenotypes, presents a major threat to malaria control.

EID Edi C, Koudou BG, Jones CM, Weetman D, Ranson H. Multiple-Insecticide Resistance in Anopheles gambiae Mosquitoes, Southern Côte d’Ivoire. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1508-1511. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120262
AMA Edi C, Koudou BG, Jones CM, et al. Multiple-Insecticide Resistance in Anopheles gambiae Mosquitoes, Southern Côte d’Ivoire. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1508-1511. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120262.
APA Edi, C., Koudou, B. G., Jones, C. M., Weetman, D., & Ranson, H. (2012). Multiple-Insecticide Resistance in Anopheles gambiae Mosquitoes, Southern Côte d’Ivoire. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1508-1511. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120262.

Schmallenberg Virus in Domestic Cattle, Belgium, 2012 [PDF - 193 KB - 3 pages]
M. Garigliany et al.

To determine prevalence of antibodies against Schmallenberg virus in adult cows and proportion of infection transmitted to fetuses, we tested serum samples from 519 cow/calf pairs in Belgium in spring 2012. Of cattle within 250 km of location where the virus emerged, ≈91% tested positive for IgG targeting nucleoprotein. Risk for fetal infection was ≈28%.

EID Garigliany M, Bayrou C, Kleijnen D, Cassart D, Desmecht D. Schmallenberg Virus in Domestic Cattle, Belgium, 2012. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1512-1514. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120716
AMA Garigliany M, Bayrou C, Kleijnen D, et al. Schmallenberg Virus in Domestic Cattle, Belgium, 2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1512-1514. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120716.
APA Garigliany, M., Bayrou, C., Kleijnen, D., Cassart, D., & Desmecht, D. (2012). Schmallenberg Virus in Domestic Cattle, Belgium, 2012. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1512-1514. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120716.

Antimicrobial Drug Use and Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pyogenes, Belgium [PDF - 312 KB - 4 pages]
L. Van Heirstraeten et al.

In Belgium, decreasing macrolide, lincosamide, streptogramins B, and tetracycline use during 1997–2007 correlated significantly with decreasing macrolide-resistant Streptococcus pyogenes during 1999–2009. Maintaining drug use below a critical threshold corresponded with low-level macrolide-resistant S. pyogenes and an increased number of erm(A)-harboring emm77 S. pyogenes with low fitness costs.

EID Van Heirstraeten L, Coenen S, Lammens C, Hens N, Goossens H, Malhotra-Kumar S. Antimicrobial Drug Use and Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pyogenes, Belgium. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1515-1518. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120049
AMA Van Heirstraeten L, Coenen S, Lammens C, et al. Antimicrobial Drug Use and Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pyogenes, Belgium. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1515-1518. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120049.
APA Van Heirstraeten, L., Coenen, S., Lammens, C., Hens, N., Goossens, H., & Malhotra-Kumar, S. (2012). Antimicrobial Drug Use and Macrolide-Resistant Streptococcus pyogenes, Belgium. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1515-1518. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120049.

Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus among Healthy Show Pigs, United States [PDF - 152 KB - 3 pages]
G. C. Gray et al.

Within 5 months after the earliest detection of human influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, we found molecular and culture evidence of the virus in healthy US show pigs. The mixing of humans and pigs at swine shows possibly could further the geographic and cross-species spread of influenza A viruses.

EID Gray GC, Bender JB, Bridges CB, Daly RF, Krueger WS, Male MJ, et al. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus among Healthy Show Pigs, United States. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1519-1521. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120431
AMA Gray GC, Bender JB, Bridges CB, et al. Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus among Healthy Show Pigs, United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1519-1521. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120431.
APA Gray, G. C., Bender, J. B., Bridges, C. B., Daly, R. F., Krueger, W. S., Male, M. J....Cox, N. J. (2012). Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 Virus among Healthy Show Pigs, United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1519-1521. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120431.
Letters

Aeromonas spp. Bacteremia in Pregnant Women, Thailand–Myanmar Border, 2011 [PDF - 151 KB - 2 pages]
P. Turner et al.
EID Turner P, Willemse C, Phakaudom K, Zin T, Nosten F, McGready R. Aeromonas spp. Bacteremia in Pregnant Women, Thailand–Myanmar Border, 2011. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1522-1523. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111592
AMA Turner P, Willemse C, Phakaudom K, et al. Aeromonas spp. Bacteremia in Pregnant Women, Thailand–Myanmar Border, 2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1522-1523. doi:10.3201/eid1809.111592.
APA Turner, P., Willemse, C., Phakaudom, K., Zin, T., Nosten, F., & McGready, R. (2012). Aeromonas spp. Bacteremia in Pregnant Women, Thailand–Myanmar Border, 2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1522-1523. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111592.

blaOXA-181–positive Klebsiella pneumoniae, Singapore [PDF - 142 KB - 2 pages]
T. H. Koh et al.
EID Koh TH, Cao D, Chan KS, Wijaya L, Low S, Lam MS, et al. blaOXA-181–positive Klebsiella pneumoniae, Singapore. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1524-1525. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111727
AMA Koh TH, Cao D, Chan KS, et al. blaOXA-181–positive Klebsiella pneumoniae, Singapore. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1524-1525. doi:10.3201/eid1809.111727.
APA Koh, T. H., Cao, D., Chan, K. S., Wijaya, L., Low, S., Lam, M. S....Hsu, L. (2012). blaOXA-181–positive Klebsiella pneumoniae, Singapore. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1524-1525. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111727.

Dengue Fever in South Korea, 2006–2010 [PDF - 152 KB - 3 pages]
J. Park and D. Lee
EID Park J, Lee D. Dengue Fever in South Korea, 2006–2010. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1525-1527. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111811
AMA Park J, Lee D. Dengue Fever in South Korea, 2006–2010. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1525-1527. doi:10.3201/eid1809.111811.
APA Park, J., & Lee, D. (2012). Dengue Fever in South Korea, 2006–2010. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1525-1527. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111811.

Brucellosis in Takins, China [PDF - 164 KB - 3 pages]
J. Luo et al.
EID Luo J, Zeng Z, Song Y, He H. Brucellosis in Takins, China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1527-1529. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120069
AMA Luo J, Zeng Z, Song Y, et al. Brucellosis in Takins, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1527-1529. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120069.
APA Luo, J., Zeng, Z., Song, Y., & He, H. (2012). Brucellosis in Takins, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1527-1529. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120069.

Measles and Secondary Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis [PDF - 243 KB - 2 pages]
J. Lupo et al.
EID Lupo J, Timsit J, Morand P, Iaria C, Leonardi M, Buda A, et al. Measles and Secondary Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1529-1530. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120235
AMA Lupo J, Timsit J, Morand P, et al. Measles and Secondary Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1529-1530. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120235.
APA Lupo, J., Timsit, J., Morand, P., Iaria, C., Leonardi, M., Buda, A....Cascio, A. (2012). Measles and Secondary Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1529-1530. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120235.

Contaminated Soil and Transmission of Influenza Virus (H5N1) [PDF - 167 KB - 3 pages]
R. A. Gutiérrez and P. Buchy
EID Gutiérrez RA, Buchy P. Contaminated Soil and Transmission of Influenza Virus (H5N1). Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1530-1531. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120402
AMA Gutiérrez RA, Buchy P. Contaminated Soil and Transmission of Influenza Virus (H5N1). Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1530-1531. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120402.
APA Gutiérrez, R. A., & Buchy, P. (2012). Contaminated Soil and Transmission of Influenza Virus (H5N1). Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1530-1531. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120402.

Rickettsia raoultii–like Bacteria in Dermacentor spp. Ticks, Tibet, China [PDF - 224 KB - 3 pages]
Y. Wang et al.
EID Wang Y, Liu Z, Yang J, Chen Z, Liu J, Li Y, et al. Rickettsia raoultii–like Bacteria in Dermacentor spp. Ticks, Tibet, China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1531-1533. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120644
AMA Wang Y, Liu Z, Yang J, et al. Rickettsia raoultii–like Bacteria in Dermacentor spp. Ticks, Tibet, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1531-1533. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120644.
APA Wang, Y., Liu, Z., Yang, J., Chen, Z., Liu, J., Li, Y....Yin, H. (2012). Rickettsia raoultii–like Bacteria in Dermacentor spp. Ticks, Tibet, China. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1531-1533. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120644.

Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis Infection, Austria [PDF - 151 KB - 2 pages]
W. Poeppl et al.
EID Poeppl W, Burgmann H, Auer H, Mooseder G, Walochnik J. Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis Infection, Austria. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1533-1535. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111365
AMA Poeppl W, Burgmann H, Auer H, et al. Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis Infection, Austria. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1533-1535. doi:10.3201/eid1809.111365.
APA Poeppl, W., Burgmann, H., Auer, H., Mooseder, G., & Walochnik, J. (2012). Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis Infection, Austria. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1533-1535. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111365.

Henipavirus-related Sequences in Fruit Bat Bushmeat, Republic of Congo [PDF - 143 KB - 2 pages]
S. Weiss et al.
EID Weiss S, Nowak K, Fahr J, Wibbelt G, Mombouli J, Parra H, et al. Henipavirus-related Sequences in Fruit Bat Bushmeat, Republic of Congo. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1535-1536. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111607
AMA Weiss S, Nowak K, Fahr J, et al. Henipavirus-related Sequences in Fruit Bat Bushmeat, Republic of Congo. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1535-1536. doi:10.3201/eid1809.111607.
APA Weiss, S., Nowak, K., Fahr, J., Wibbelt, G., Mombouli, J., Parra, H....Leendertz, F. H. (2012). Henipavirus-related Sequences in Fruit Bat Bushmeat, Republic of Congo. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1535-1536. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111607.

Severe Measles, Vitamin A Deficiency, and the Roma Community in Europe [PDF - 142 KB - 3 pages]
C. Melenotte et al.
EID Melenotte C, Brouqui P, Botelho-Nevers E. Severe Measles, Vitamin A Deficiency, and the Roma Community in Europe. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1537-1538. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111701
AMA Melenotte C, Brouqui P, Botelho-Nevers E. Severe Measles, Vitamin A Deficiency, and the Roma Community in Europe. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1537-1538. doi:10.3201/eid1809.111701.
APA Melenotte, C., Brouqui, P., & Botelho-Nevers, E. (2012). Severe Measles, Vitamin A Deficiency, and the Roma Community in Europe. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1537-1538. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.111701.

Picobirnaviruses in the Human Respiratory Tract [PDF - 149 KB - 2 pages]
S. L. Smits et al.
EID Smits SL, van Leeuwen M, Schapendonk C, Schürch AC, Bodewes R, Haagmans BL, et al. Picobirnaviruses in the Human Respiratory Tract. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1538-1539. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120507
AMA Smits SL, van Leeuwen M, Schapendonk C, et al. Picobirnaviruses in the Human Respiratory Tract. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1538-1539. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120507.
APA Smits, S. L., van Leeuwen, M., Schapendonk, C., Schürch, A. C., Bodewes, R., Haagmans, B. L....Osterhaus, A. (2012). Picobirnaviruses in the Human Respiratory Tract. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1538-1539. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120507.

New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase 4–producing Escherichia coli in Cameroon [PDF - 150 KB - 3 pages]
L. Dortet et al.
EID Dortet L, Poirel L, Anguel N, Nordmann P. New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase 4–producing Escherichia coli in Cameroon. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1540-1541. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120011
AMA Dortet L, Poirel L, Anguel N, et al. New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase 4–producing Escherichia coli in Cameroon. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1540-1541. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120011.
APA Dortet, L., Poirel, L., Anguel, N., & Nordmann, P. (2012). New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase 4–producing Escherichia coli in Cameroon. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1540-1541. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120011.

Salmonella enterica Serovar Agbeni, British Columbia, Canada, 2011 [PDF - 140 KB - 2 pages]
M. Taylor et al.
EID Taylor M, Brisdon S, Jeyes J, Stone J, Embree G, Paccagnella A, et al. Salmonella enterica Serovar Agbeni, British Columbia, Canada, 2011. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1541-1543. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120008
AMA Taylor M, Brisdon S, Jeyes J, et al. Salmonella enterica Serovar Agbeni, British Columbia, Canada, 2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1541-1543. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120008.
APA Taylor, M., Brisdon, S., Jeyes, J., Stone, J., Embree, G., Paccagnella, A....Galanis, E. (2012). Salmonella enterica Serovar Agbeni, British Columbia, Canada, 2011. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1541-1543. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120008.

Entamoeba bangladeshi nov. sp., Bangladesh [PDF - 151 KB - 3 pages]
T. L. Royer et al.
EID Royer TL, Gilchrist C, Kabir M, Arju T, Ralston KS, Haque R, et al. Entamoeba bangladeshi nov. sp., Bangladesh. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1543-1544. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120122
AMA Royer TL, Gilchrist C, Kabir M, et al. Entamoeba bangladeshi nov. sp., Bangladesh. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1543-1544. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120122.
APA Royer, T. L., Gilchrist, C., Kabir, M., Arju, T., Ralston, K. S., Haque, R....Petri, W. A. (2012). Entamoeba bangladeshi nov. sp., Bangladesh. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1543-1544. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120122.

Autochthonous Leishmania siamensis in Horse, Florida, USA [PDF - 149 KB - 3 pages]
S. M. Reuss et al.
EID Reuss SM, Dunbar MD, Mays MB, Owen JL, Mallicote MF, Archer LL, et al. Autochthonous Leishmania siamensis in Horse, Florida, USA. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1545-1546. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120184
AMA Reuss SM, Dunbar MD, Mays MB, et al. Autochthonous Leishmania siamensis in Horse, Florida, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1545-1546. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120184.
APA Reuss, S. M., Dunbar, M. D., Mays, M. B., Owen, J. L., Mallicote, M. F., Archer, L. L....Wellehan, J. (2012). Autochthonous Leishmania siamensis in Horse, Florida, USA. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1545-1546. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120184.

Novel Vectors of Malaria Parasites in the Western Highlands of Kenya [PDF - 167 KB - 3 pages]
J. Stevenson et al.
EID Stevenson J, St. Laurent B, Lobo NF, Cooke MK, Kahindi SC, Oriango RM, et al. Novel Vectors of Malaria Parasites in the Western Highlands of Kenya. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1547-1549. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120283
AMA Stevenson J, St. Laurent B, Lobo NF, et al. Novel Vectors of Malaria Parasites in the Western Highlands of Kenya. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1547-1549. doi:10.3201/eid1809.120283.
APA Stevenson, J., St. Laurent, B., Lobo, N. F., Cooke, M. K., Kahindi, S. C., Oriango, R. M....Drakeley, C. (2012). Novel Vectors of Malaria Parasites in the Western Highlands of Kenya. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1547-1549. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.120283.
About the Cover

Riddle in Nine Syllables [PDF - 170 KB - 2 pages]
P. Potter
EID Potter P. Riddle in Nine Syllables. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1550-1551. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.ac1809
AMA Potter P. Riddle in Nine Syllables. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1550-1551. doi:10.3201/eid1809.ac1809.
APA Potter, P. (2012). Riddle in Nine Syllables. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1550-1551. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.ac1809.
Etymologia

Etymologia: Anopheles [PDF - 212 KB - 1 page]
EID Etymologia: Anopheles. Emerg Infect Dis. 2012;18(9):1511. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.et1809
AMA Etymologia: Anopheles. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2012;18(9):1511. doi:10.3201/eid1809.et1809.
APA (2012). Etymologia: Anopheles. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(9), 1511. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1809.et1809.
Page created: October 19, 2012
Page updated: October 19, 2012
Page reviewed: October 19, 2012
The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors' affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.
edit_01 Submit Manuscript
Issue Select
GO
GO

Get Email Updates

To receive email updates about this page, enter your email address:

file_external