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Volume 23, Number 12—December 2017

Synopsis

Spread of Canine Influenza A(H3N2) Virus, United States

Ian E.H. Voorhees, Amy L. Glaser, Kathy Toohey-Kurth, Sandra Newbury, Benjamin D. Dalziel, Edward J. Dubovi, Keith Poulsen, Christian Leutenegger, Katriina J.E. Willgert, Laura Brisbane-Cohen, Jill Richardson-Lopez, Edward C. Holmes, and Colin R. ParrishComments to Author 
Author affiliations: Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA (I.E.H. Voorhees, A.L. Glaser, E.J. Dubovi, K.J.E. Willgert, L. Brisbane-Cohen, C.R. Parrish); University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin, USA (K. Toohey-Kurth, S. Newbury, K. Poulsen); Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, USA (B.D. Dalziel); IDEXX Laboratories, West Sacramento, California, USA (C. Leutenegger); Royal Veterinary College, London, UK (K.J.E. Willgert); Merck Animal Health, Madison, New Jersey, USA (J. Richardson-Lopez); University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia (E.C. Holmes)

Main Article

Figure 1

Incidence of canine influenza A(H3N2) virus RNA–positive dogs in the Chicago, Illinois, area, USA, March 14–April 27, 2015. A) Weekly testing summary of samples collected within Illinois. B) Weekly testing summary of samples collected in all other states. C) Presence of virus in the Midwest region, by US postal code.

Figure 1. Incidence of canine influenza A(H3N2) virus RNA–positive dogs in the Chicago, Illinois, area, USA, March 14–April 27, 2015. A) Weekly testing summary of samples collected within Illinois. B) Weekly testing summary of samples collected in all other states. C) Presence of virus in the Midwest region, by US postal code.

Main Article

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